Results 2,126 to 2,150 of 2347

  1. Post
    I abandoned The Trial at around 80% and hit up China Mieville's new short story compilation, Three Moments of an Explosion. I've only read a couple of them so far, but thoroughly enjoying it. This dude's writing is a league above most of the shit I've been reading lately.

  2. Post
    werewolves? wrote:
    Seveneves – Neal Stephenson

    So awesome.

    Now Poseidon's Wake and Nemesis Games are out too...
    Also reading Seveneves. Pretty interesting so far at about a 1/4 in.

  3. Post
    Listening to the BBC got me interested in a a whole different group of books than I would normally read..
    Tom Keneally's (author of Shindlers Ark) The Daughters of Mars, follows two sisters who as nurses sign up to serve with the Australian army medical core during WWI. Its a fiction based on historic events and and I enjoyed it a lot.

    Nguyen Thanh Nhan - Away from Home Season, follows a Vietnamese soldier fighting in Cambodia. I found this really hard going, probably in part due to the translation and gave up.

    Boulalem Sansal - Harraga, Set in post independence Algeria follows a secular woman doctor trying to cope with the country around her falling apart, when a pregnant teenager from the conservative countryside falls into her life. No idea why I picked it up except that the author is anti-establishment and has been banned in Algeria. I found it slow to read but interesting none the less, I suspect that some nuances were lost in translation.

    James Salter - The Hunters. James Salter was a fighter pilot during the Korean war and this novel follows his experiences. It is required reading in the US Airforce and offers a good insight into the boredom and excitement of war and air to air combat. At least in the early jet fighter days.

    Olivier Truc - Forty Days without a Shadow, a crime thriller set in the Norwegian Arctic circle following the exploits of the Lapland Reindeer Police (Norwegian, Swedish and Finnish agency set up to manage herd and grazing disputes between Sami reindeer herders). Easy read, if somewhat predictable/linear, still I enjoyed it.

    Mark Haddon - The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time - I think this is a classic young adult story? Good, quick read. Interesting to get a little bit into the mind of an autistic young person, rituals and rules they form to cope with the world and how the world doesn't cope with his literal, honest approach.

    Paul E Hardisty - The Abrupt Physics of Dying. Paul is a geologist working in the oil business in the middle east, and some of his experiences inspired him to write this book about corruption and exploitation in that business. Loosely based on his experiences it is a work of fiction. Again a fun read, well paced and not challenging in technical details they story carried on further than I expected and there will be a second book. The main character reminds me a little of Lee Child's Jack Reacher, a little too perfect in his capabilities but not quite that bad.

    I'm currently reading Northern Lights by Phillip Pullman which is back in line with my normal reading tastes (made harder for having already seen the Golden Compass )

  4. Post
    I read The Martian (Andy Weir) a couple of weeks ago, after hearing the premise from the movie funnily enough... Written so simply and directly, but the Problem - Solution technical side of the story really engaged me. Actually kinda looking forward to the movie now, even though the trailer tries to make everything overly excited in true hollywood style.

  5. Post
    Jim Henson - By Brian Jay Jones. Fascinating look at a really creative man.

  6. Post
    Star Wars: Tarkin, by James Luceno. A decent read. Didn't explode my face, but it was readable. That said, there were some spelling errors.

    Now I'm reading Shantaram, by Gregory David Roberts. It's a properly good read. Recommended. Easily the best book about India I've read, which may not be saying much.

  7. Post
    Been making my way through Wheel of Time series by Robert Jordan as suggested by people previously in this thread. About three books through and I'm really enjoying it. Characters are definitely growing on me and I find his writing descriptive without being over the top. Wouldn't mind a bit more action though, but that's just personal preference.

  8. Post
    Futureland by Walter Mosley. It's a collection of loosely linked short stories based in the near future. Mainly based around how current day issues could become in the future. I'm really enjoying it.

  9. Post
    I have "The Shepherd's Crown" on deck and man... reading this is going to be a bittersweet experience...

  10. Post
    I recently finished Hyperion and The Fall Of Hyperion, and while they were really well written, and quite compelling, i think the end of 'The Fall' was kinda lacking. I've lost my mojo for the series, so can't see me carrying on with the following 2 books anytime soon.

    Part way through Ancillary Justice by Ann Leckie. Again, it's really well written, but it's a bit slow for me, to be honest. I'm 500 pages into it, and feel that what has happened so far could have easily fit in half that, and not been so stodgy.

    I think the punchy, fast-paced Expanse Series by James S A Corey has left me a little tired of long-winded, overblown sci-fi. I know it's the Danielle Steel of sci-fi, but still.

    Can anyone recommend me some decent sci-fi that's a bit snappier than your average?

  11. Post
    ^ Have you read any Peter F. Hamilton? It's not quite as frenetic as Corey, but things keep happening, and it's top rate space opera.

    Having knocked off Shantaram, which I enjoyed despite its semi autobiographical pretensions, I've finally gotten onto Pratchett and Baxter's final collaboration, The Long Utopia. I'm enjoying it more than books 2 and 3 (The Long War and The Long Mars); I'd put it up there with book 1 (The Long Earth).

    It's bittersweet, of course.

  12. Post
    Frederick James wrote:
    I recently finished Hyperion and The Fall Of Hyperion, and while they were really well written, and quite compelling, i think the end of 'The Fall' was kinda lacking. I've lost my mojo for the series, so can't see me carrying on with the following 2 books anytime soon.

    Part way through Ancillary Justice by Ann Leckie. Again, it's really well written, but it's a bit slow for me, to be honest. I'm 500 pages into it, and feel that what has happened so far could have easily fit in half that, and not been so stodgy.

    I think the punchy, fast-paced Expanse Series by James S A Corey has left me a little tired of long-winded, overblown sci-fi. I know it's the Danielle Steel of sci-fi, but still.

    Can anyone recommend me some decent sci-fi that's a bit snappier than your average?
    Have you tried anything by John Scalzi?

  13. Post
    GaR wrote:
    ^ Have you read any Peter F. Hamilton? It's not quite as frenetic as Corey, but things keep happening, and it's top rate space opera.
    I thought i had, but i've since realised that it was Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle (The Mote in Gods Eye, which was awesome).

    What would you recommend i start with? From what Wikipedia says, i don't think his first works, the Greg Mandel trilogy, are quite what i'm looking for. Maybe the Nights Dawn trilogy?

    Lord Montgomery wrote:
    Have you tried anything by John Scalzi?
    Haven't heard of him - what would you recommend?

  14. Post
    Either Night's Dawn or the Commonwealth Saga. They're both fun. The latter has just had a TV pilot commissioned, which strikes me as extremely ambitious.

  15. Post
    the October Daye series by Seanan McGuire, i dont know how i missed this series but there are 9 books and each book just gets better, very similar to the Jim Butcher series but i am enjoying this series more, Highly recommended.

    http://seananmcguire.com/toby.php

  16. Post
    Just finished Ibis Trilogy by Amitav Ghosh - great read. Reading Red Mars atm.

  17. Post
    Frederick James wrote:
    Haven't heard of him - what would you recommend?
    Old mans war is pretty good. Light reading for a sci-fi, less of a lecture and more of a fast paced action novel, does a good job of avoiding a lot of the more typical sci-fi cliches.

  18. Post
    I might start with Lord Montgomery's suggestion, then have a crack at the Commonwealth saga. I'm about 2/3 of the way through the Ann Leckie one, Ancillary Justice, so i'm going to persevere with that first.

    Cheers for the suggestions.

  19. Post
    Strangers in the city: reconfigurations of space, power and social networks within China's floating population - Li Zhang

  20. Post
    The Long Utopia was really good. Bookends the series nicely, though I wouldn't be opposed to Baxter continuing to explore this universe.

    Then I decided to hit up Midnight's Children, by Salman Rushdie. In part to contrast it to Shantaram, which is also set in India. I couldn't really stick with it. I realise the man's a respected author, but it just strikes me as self-indulgent twaddle (yes, even more so than Shantaram).

    The other day a new Star Wars novel appeared on my Kindle with the unwieldy title Star Wars: Aftermath: Journey to Star Wars: The Force Awakens. I wish I was making this up.

    It's more or less what you'd expect from a Star Wars novel. It's fun and has lasers and starships and so on, but it does not boast the most polished writing. This is especially stark after Rushdie's over the top prose. I'll probably be able to at least finish this one though. It has lots of interesting details about the events after the Battle of Endor, and it's all canon.

  21. Post
    Currently reading The Wise Mans Fear which is the 2nd book in the series, The Kingkiller Chronicle. The first book which I finished the other week is The Name of the Wind. Now I wouldn't normally read a fantasy book, but the reviews got me interested. I'm glad I did, because these books are amazing! Fantastic writing. Every scene is marvelously executed. The story grabs you from the start and is wonderfully engaging. I was so hooked after the 1st book I instantly started the 2nd. 3rd one due 2017 I believe.

    Highly recommeneded. Patrick Rothfuss is the writer.

  22. Post
    s0cks wrote:
    Currently reading The Wise Mans Fear which is the 2nd book in the series, The Kingkiller Chronicle. The first book which I finished the other week is The Name of the Wind. Now I wouldn't normally read a fantasy book, but the reviews got me interested. I'm glad I did, because these books are amazing! Fantastic writing. Every scene is marvelously executed. The story grabs you from the start and is wonderfully engaging. I was so hooked after the 1st book I instantly started the 2nd. 3rd one due 2017 I believe.

    Highly recommeneded. Patrick Rothfuss is the writer.
    you can join the rest of us on the wait for the third book, 4 years now and its good to know i have only 2 years left to wait.

  23. Post
    Toolman wrote:
    you can join the rest of us on the wait for the third book, 4 years now and its good to know i have only 2 years left to wait.
    I'm not sure this is going to be a trilogy -if you look at all the things that are still to be covered to get us to the point where the story started and then things still need to get resolved after that.

    Book three is either going to be huge or there are a lot more novels (and waiting) to come...

    Ronthfuss already cheated in book two by time skipping a whole chunk of story...

  24. Post
    About halfway through Hyperion.What a fantastic book.If it continues like it has it could be in my top five easy

  25. Post
    Swampy wrote:
    About halfway through Hyperion.What a fantastic book.If it continues like it has it could be in my top five easy
    You might as well get the sequel too -the first book doesn't actually end...