Page 5 of 9 First ... 2345678 ... Last
Results 101 to 125 of 224

  1. Post
    What was the ending that leaked months ago, that they had to change?

  2. Post
    Jesus, what is wrong with a good ending? Are we all so jaded these days that we need some depressing vague ending with a "Shepard set us up the bomb, but buy our DLC guys" popup?

    How about Shepard defeats the reapers, gets the girl/boy, we get a Baldur's Gate-esque ending where we see the fates of all his companions, and perhaps a hint of something menacing in the future leaving it open for a future games.

  3. Post
    Bobs wrote:
    How about Shepard defeats the reapers, gets the girl/boy, we get a Baldur's Gate-esque ending where we see the fates of all his companions, and perhaps a hint of something menacing in the future leaving it open for a future games.
    Sounds like Halo 3. Not that there's anything wrong with that kind of ending mind you, I would just prefer something that's a little more open to each players interpretation rather than a textbook fairytale ending.

  4. Post
    InvisibleShadow wrote:
    Sounds like Halo 3. Not that there's anything wrong with that kind of ending mind you, I would just prefer something that's a little more open to each players interpretation rather than a textbook fairytale ending.
    It doesn't have to be a fairy tale ending. Afterall, during the play through you still need to make the hard decisions. I killed Mordin and Wrex in my game.

    Just get tired of all these movies (and now it is creeping into games) or having these weird and grim mysticism-like endings that people have to dissect to even try and understand what the hell happened. Perhaps "good" wasn't the correct word I should have used. "Clear" would be better. A clear ending where most of the plot threads are tied up and you know what the hell just happened.

  5. Post
    Aurora wrote:
    For my own personal interest, can someone please, in brief bullet points, explain the main plot of ME and the ending and why it is considered so ****? I can't find a single article on HOW the ending actually plays out, just how **** it is.
    There are 3 long games I had to summarise, so obviously I had to omit a lot of things:

    - The series is based on the premise that there's a fifth universal force, dark energy, that can be controlled in certain ways to increase or decrease the mass of objects (by generating mass effect fields, hence the name). This leads to all sorts of applications, like new weapons, shields, faster than light travel and even Force-like telekinetic powers.

    - Humanity has only recently discovered this technology and is exploring our galaxy, which is full of other sentient races. The situation is quite peaceful, with a 3-race Council governing from a massive space station called the Citadel. The Citadel wasn't actually built by them, but found, so no-one knows who actually made it and for what purpose.

    - The first game starts with you investigating artifacts left by the Protheans, an ancient alien civilisation that disappeared thousands of years ago. You learn that these people were actually destroyed by machines called Reapers for unknown reasons, and that this cycle of extinction has been repeating every 50 000 years. Basically, Reapers come in, kill every advanced organic race and leave the galaxy. Now they're coming back.

    - Reapers appear as huge spaceships that are virtually indestructible, so while they can technically be defeated in a "normal" Star Wars-like space battle, it's just not going to happen. There are thousands of them and their technology is far more advanced.

    - Turns out the Citadel was actually the key to repeated Reaper invasions - it's basically a giant portal that, if activated, allowed Reapers to teleport straight into the heart of all galactic civilisation and easily destroy everything. This time (in ME1) this plan had failed because the Citadel was sabotaged by the Protheans to no longer respond to Reaper commands, so it had to be activated manually. You defeat the agents of the Reapers who try to reactive the Citadel and all is safe for the moment.

    - In ME2 you fight more agents of the Reapers, the Collectors. They've been abducting humans to somehow bring about their "perfection" and "ascension". What exactly they or the Reapers are doing (and why) isn't explained properly, so everyone assumed that ME3 will make their motivations clear.

    - The arrival of the Reapers has now been delayed, so they had to resort to a conventional attack - i.e. just fly into the galaxy instead of teleporting into it. This is where ME3 starts.

    - You unite the races of the galaxy while scientists construct a spaceship called the Crucible (based on old Prothean technology, once again), a device that supposedly can wipe out the Reapers. Nobody knows how it works, but we do know that it needs to dock with the Citadel. So, at the very end of ME3, the Crucible docks with the Citadel and you (wounded and possibly dying at that stage) reach the Citadel's main control room that has somehow remained hidden for thousands of years. What follows is a nonsensical sequence of events that has given rise to various theories about the ending.

    - In the end, an AI that "lives" in the Citadel (which for some reason presents itself to you as a hologram of a small child) tells you that it controls the Reapers. It says that Reaper invasions are necessary because if advanced organic life is not periodically destroyed, then it will create synthetic life, i.e. robots, and then these robots will eventually go out of control and kill everything in the galaxy, making any kind of organic life impossible. This logic is debatable, but in the context of the game it is actually insulting, considering that one of the choices the player can make is broker peace between an organic and a synthetic race.

    - The choice at the end boils down to controlling the Reapers - making them leave by somehow fusing with them, destroying them (and all other synthetic life, including one of your crew members) or creating one race of beings by making everyone into an organic-synthetic hybrid. The implications of your choice are not clear: the AI does not tell you much about each option. Also, nothing is really explained by the cinematics that follow any of the 3 choices and there's a lot of space magic (i.e. nearly magical events that really do not belong in a sci-fi game) involved. The cinematics are also mostly the same, regardless of the choices you make.

    - Now, the problem is Bioware has repeatedly emphasised the importance of player choice in all 3 games and placed a lot of emphasis on personal relationships with your ship's crew members. The ending does not explain what happens to your team, humanity or other races of the galaxy. It also makes it seem that your choices leading up to the ending of ME3 were irrelevant.

    There's a lot more that can be said about the ending, but essentially it's very unsatisfying to many players and is inconsistent on many levels. Feel free to ask more if you want.

  6. Post
    Bobs wrote:
    It doesn't have to be a fairy tale ending. Afterall, during the play through you still need to make the hard decisions. I killed Mordin and Wrex in my game.

    Just get tired of all these movies (and now it is creeping into games) or having these weird and grim mysticism-like endings that people have to dissect to even try and understand what the hell happened. Perhaps "good" wasn't the correct word I should have used. "Clear" would be better. A clear ending where most of the plot threads are tied up and you know what the hell just happened.
    That's fair enough, I can understand why most people would prefer that. Particularly as this is a mainstream videogame. If ME3 had an ending where the reapers were categorically defeated, the galaxy saved and Shepard crowned as a hero, and the result of every choice in the game shown then I would have still enjoyed it a lot.

    I just personally enjoy the endings where there is no definitve answer the most (the film Shutter Island is a favourite). It leaves it up to each viewer to come up with their own interpretation of what has happened and what will continue to happen rather than spelling it all out and leaving nothing to the imagination. But I'm part of the minority who enjoyed the ending for ME3, so my opinion doesn't count for much I reckon. If Bioware decide to alter the ending then I guess I will just have to roll with it, but I would prefer it to be left as is tbh.

    kapusta wrote:
    - The choice at the end boils down to controlling the Reapers - making them leave by somehow fusing with them, destroying them (and all other synthetic life, including one of your crew members) or creating one race of beings by making everyone into an organic-synthetic hybrid. The implications of your choice are not clear: the AI does not tell you much about each option. Also, nothing is really explained by the cinematics that follow any of the 3 choices and there's a lot of space magic (i.e. nearly magical events that really do not belong in a sci-fi game) involved. The cinematics are also mostly the same, regardless of the choices you make.
    The reason I liked ME3's ending so much was because the implications of that choice were not spelled out. The repercussions of that choice would impact the galaxy for thousands upon thousands of years, and to my way of thinking there is no way that anybody could predict all the possible outcomes. Though I agree that the following cinematic was confusing and IMO, pretty pointless considering the magnitude of the choice beforehand.

    My ideal ending would have been that Shepard makes his choice, the screen fades to black and the credits roll. THE END. But I can only imagine how bad the reaction to that kind of ending would have been.

  7. Post
    The character of Shepard fundamentally would not have given in to the spaceboy AI or made any of her given "choices" She would have found another way, as she always does.

    This fact alone severely hurts the ending. Shepard spent 3 games defying all of the odds only to whimper off into the night.

  8. Post
    For all we know we could say the same of Saren, Matriarch Benezia, Dr. Amanda Kenson, and The Illusive Man. Until they were indoctrinated.

  9. Post
    InvisibleShadow wrote:
    The reason I liked ME3's ending so much was because the implications of that choice were not spelled out. The repercussions of that choice would impact the galaxy for thousands upon thousands of years, and to my way of thinking there is no way that anybody could predict all the possible outcomes. Though I agree that the following cinematic was confusing and IMO, pretty pointless considering the magnitude of the choice beforehand.

    My ideal ending would have been that Shepard makes his choice, the screen fades to black and the credits roll. THE END. But I can only imagine how bad the reaction to that kind of ending would have been.
    Sure, if the you liked the ending, that's fine. In fact, seeing that I'm not an indoc supporter, I think this is exactly what Bioware were aiming for: a deliberately unclear ending that (in their eyes) would've satisfied most players by letting them imagine the consequences themselves and speculate on the possible fate of the galaxy. Of course, they then went and inserted those bizarre cinematics (and the Stargazer scene) at the end that only further complicate things.

    As for indoctrination itself, I'll deal with some points cited as "evidence" in the evening.

  10. Post
    entensity wrote:
    Maybe it was me being powered up well
    haha my point was 'nothing took more than mulitple tries' as if there was ANY other option. Once you get passed the first try, the ONLY thing that can happen (providing you are continuing the game) is multiple tries.

  11. Post
    I find fairy tale endings so false and hard to believe.

  12. Post
    Bloodline wrote:
    I find fairy tale endings so false and hard to believe.
    Shepard captures Harbinger and he tells Shepard to go to a remote system and the Reaper plans will be explained to him. Once they get there a shuttle shows up and drops off a holopad, when Shepard opens it he/she finds a scan of Shepard's lovers severed head. Shepard shoots Harbinger in the face repeatedly and then sinks into a deep depression. Last scene is Anderson narrating off camera. "Hewimgway once said this galaxy is good, and worth fighting for. I agree with the second part."

  13. Post
    I don't get why people on the other side of the fence automatically jump and exaggerate the issue. Fairy tales are for children i don't want that, just don't fundamentally betray the character of shepard and all you've built so you can slap together a ten minute rush job Evangelion aping mess.

  14. Post
    Exaggeration is obviously on both sides. Your exaggerating on your side and others on the + ending side

  15. Post
    Im sure someone else has mentioned it, but ME3 ending for me is a bit of a dead ringer for the Battlestar Galactica series finale.

    entensity wrote:
    Exaggeration is obviously on both sides. Your exaggerating on your side and others on the + ending side
    The ending makes no sense. Thats not an exaggeration. Thats factoids.

  16. Post
    kapusta wrote:
    PLOT SUMMARY
    To follow on from this, the ending was also not what Bioware "promised". Pre-release developer quotes:

    Interview with Mac Walters (Lead Writer)
    “[The presence of the Rachni] has huge consequences in Mass Effect 3. Even just in the final battle with the Reapers.”

    Interview with Mike Gamble (Associate Producer)
    “There are many different endings. We wouldn’t do it any other way. How could you go through all three campaigns playing as your Shepard and then be forced into a bespoke ending that everyone gets? But I can’t say any more than that…”

    Interview with Casey Hudson (Director)
    “Fans want to make sure that they see things resolved, they want to get some closure, a great ending. I think they’re going to get that.”

    Interview with Casey Hudson (Director)
    “Mass Effect 3 is all about answering all the biggest questions in the lore, learning about the mysteries and the Protheans and the Reapers, being able to decide for yourself how all of these things come to an end.”

    Interview with Casey Hudson (Director)
    Interviewer: [Regarding the numerous possible endings of Mass Effect 2] “Is that same type of complexity built into the ending of Mass Effect 3?”
    Hudson: “Yeah, and I’d say much more so, because we have the ability to build the endings out in a way that we don’t have to worry about eventually tying them back together somewhere. This story arc is coming to an end with this game. That means the endings can be a lot more different. At this point we’re taking into account so many
    decisions that you’ve made as a player and reflecting a lot of that stuff. It’s not even in any way like the traditional game endings, where you can say how many endings there are or whether you got ending A, B, or C.....The endings have a lot more sophistication and variety in them.”

    Casey Hudson (Director)
    “There is a huge set of consequences that start stacking up as you approach the end-game. And even in terms of the ending itself, it continues to break down to some very large decisions. So it's not like a classic game ending where everything is linear and you make a choice between a few things - it really does layer in many, many different choices, up to the final moments, where it's going to be different for everyone who plays it.”
    Unfortunately what we get is 1 ending (OK technically there are 3 endings, with virtually identical ending cinematics). Not only is the ending not what was marketed, but as kapusta touched on - it made no sense.

  17. Post
    Yep, there's definitely a lot of broken promises from Bioware. To someone looking at all this mess from the outside, I can say this though: every disappointed fan has their own opinion of course, but I think we can separate them into the following categories (which are not mutually exclusive):

    - Disappointed by the lack of internal consistency of the ending sequence. Plenty of plot holes, absurd "logic", etc.
    - Pissed off by Bioware's broken promises, such as those as in Falco's post.
    - Wanted a happy ending (this one is contentious, but judging by the response, there's still a sizeable group who want that)
    - Thought the themes the ending was trying to get across went contrary to the spirit of the rest of the trilogy
    - Lack of closure - what happens to the characters?
    - Bioware's just trolling everyone (indoctrination theory a.k.a. comedy option)

  18. Post
    It's not exaggerating to say that the ending makes no sense, that's a matter of fact, not opinion.

  19. Post
    I hope the IT is true as it makes far more sense than the POS endings we got right now. I think BW is trolling us. I find it hard to believe that they would craft this epic, almost flawless story with deep lore & characters & then flush it all down the drain with these **** endings.

  20. Post
    supa_saiyan wrote:
    ... almost flawless story ....
    It's an impressive work overall to be sure but the story is anything but 'almost flawless'; there are so many flaws in the story and the general quality of writing it's ridiculous - the main plot for ME2 in particular was an absolute joke while many of the side missions/loyalty missions were top notch. The quality right through the ME series has been all over the place and for me personally, the series is especially notable for its inconsistency rather than being some amazingly flawless space opera as some 'critics' seem to think of it (not a dig at you personally by the way).

    That's not to say I haven't enjoyed it however. Mostly.

  21. Post
    I still remember how much I laughed when I saw how ridiculous ME2's final boss looked and how little sense the Collectors' harvesting of humans made. Then there's the Crucible, being a huge deus ex machina, suddenly introduced to defeat a supposedly unbeatable enemy. Nobody bothering to learn what the hell the Citadel really is during the thousands of years it served as a seat of galactic government? Reapers (an incredibly advanced race that is "free of weaknesses") choosing bizarre tactics such as letting organic civilisations advance to the stage where serious resistance is possible (e.g. Protheans)? Please, let's not pretend the story was flawless before ME3's conclusion.

    Now then, I disagree with the IT's interpretation of a lot of events and see it as just fanfic offering a very easy way out (a dream needs no internal consistency, so any real or imagined plot holes after the laser beam hit can just be dismissed). I could write a lengthy post about it, but right now I'll summarise my interpretation:

    - The kid is real and Shepard's dreams are meant to represent PTSD (note how you also hear the voices of your dead squadmates during those sequences).
    - The Rachni queen's reference to oily shadows is taken out of context - she was talking about her lack of knowledge about the Rachni war that took place thousands of years ago because she was just an egg and was separated from the rest of the brood.
    - The end choices aren't about what the Reapers would want you to do, but about what the starchild wants. His first lines of dialogue make it clear that he's not a Reaper and actually controls them, but the rest of the conversation just degenerates into nonsense, so not much useful information can be gathered from that.
    - EMS and its effect on the ending is a clear example of a gameplay mechanic. Remember how loyalty missions in ME2 could save your squadmates from dying? Well, it's not too different this time.
    - Shepard's been badly wounded at the end, so obviously he's not in the mood to engage in philosophical discussions about fate and the nature of free will with the starchild. That's actually the one part of the ending that has never bothered me.
    - Karpyshyn's dark energy storyline, the Final Hours app and the comments attributed to one of ME's writers do not point to indoctrination. In fact, it just seems that 2 lead writers thought they could come up with the best ending ever by themselves.

    In addition, indoctrination raises problems of its own. Even if we suppose that the Reapers need Shepard as an agent for some reason, the way they attempt to do indoctrinate him is bizarre. As far as I understand, very few IT proponents dispute that the laser beam is real and that you actually get hit by it. So that means that you are now in the Reapers' power: your assault on the beam has failed, your troops have been killed and the Reapers can now just take you away and indoctrinate you at their leisure, taking as much time as they want. What's the point of resisting if eventually they'll either break you or simply kill you? Also, if this is all a dream and you have already made your choice (you either gave in or resisted, according to IT), then why are even shown the ending cinematics?

  22. Post
    Just the fact you were able to write that much points to how effective the ending was, whether enjoyed at face value, or pored over to make it adhere to a more rigid internal logic.

  23. Post
    kapusta wrote:
    I still remember how much I laughed when I saw how ridiculous ME2's final boss looked and how little sense the Collectors' harvesting of humans made.
    Yeah I really enjoyed ME & ME2, but I was also a bit disappointed to see a giant terminator as the final boss in ME2.

    Also, reapers build themselves based on the genetics of their conquered enemies or some ****, right? So why is every single reaper other than the human reaper, a giant hand squid?

  24. Post
    Gwarden wrote:
    Just the fact you were able to write that much points to how effective the ending was, whether enjoyed at face value, or pored over to make it adhere to a more rigid internal logic.
    If you mean "effective" in a Matrix Revolutions kind of way, then sure.

  25. Post
    kapusta wrote:
    - Karpyshyn's dark energy storyline, the Final Hours app and the comments attributed to one of ME's writers do not point to indoctrination. In fact, it just seems that 2 lead writers thought they could come up with the best ending ever by themselves.
    Interesting read. Karpyshyn was the head writer in ME1 who left suddenly in ME2 right? The head writer leaving and the new writers losing the plot (combined with EA maybe rushing a release) seems more plausible then IT to me. All my own wild speculation of course.

Page 5 of 9 First ... 2345678 ... Last