Results 1 to 20 of 20

  1. Post
    #1
    The evening was everything I had dreamed and hoped it would be. The weather was perfect, the farm was filled with friends and guests roaming around talking about organic, sustainable farming practices. Our guests were excited to spend an evening together. The food was prepared exquisitely. The long dinner table, under the direction of dear friends, was absolutely stunningly beautiful. The music was superb. The stars were bright and life was really good. And then, …for a few moments, it felt like the rug was pulled out from underneath us and my wonderful world came crashing down. As guests were mingling, finishing tours of the farm, and while the first course of the meal was being prepared and ready to be sent out, a Southern Nevada Health District employee came for an inspection. - Cont
    http://www.adistinctiveworld.net/?p=6091

    Dear lord, where o where did it all go wrong?

    -edit-

    Yes this is a blog, no it isn't an isolated event. Yes I should provide a better source; I would recommend Food Inc, specifically the scene with the organic, slightly strange organic farmer. Also, I should find the article I came across a few months ago from the economist which tells a similar tale.

  2. Post
    #2
    Food safety standards exist for a reason. Also just listening to the sheer stupidity of the people at the party tells me everything I need to know about the likelihood of their version of events being true.

  3. Post
    #3
    one of my first food micro lectures the lecturer said "when i hear 'organic' I think 'dangerous'"

  4. Post
    #4
    reb wrote:
    one of my first food micro lectures the lecturer said "when i hear 'organic' I think 'dangerous'"
    Oh bull****, just go run 50km each day in bare feet it's really good for you Kenyans do it.

  5. Post
    #5
    eug1404 wrote:
    Food safety standards exist for a reason. Also just listening to the sheer stupidity of the people at the party tells me everything I need to know about the likelihood of their version of events being true.
    If the events are accurately reported, I disagree.

    -Some of the prepared food packages did not have labels on them. (The code actually allows for this if it is to be consumed within 72 hours.)
    -Some of the meat was not USDA certified. (Did I mention that this was a farm to fork meal?)
    -Some of the food that was prepared in advance was not up to temperature at the time of inspection. (It was being prepared to be brought to proper temperature for serving when the inspection occurred.)
    -Even the vegetables prepared in advance had to be thrown out because they were cut and were then considered a “bio-hazard”.
    -We did not have receipts for our food. (Reminder! This food came from farms not from the supermarket! I have talked with several chefs who have said that in all their years cooking they have never been asked for receipts.)
    On top of this being blatantly a private function instead of a retailing scenario - like-minded people (organic farming proponents) gathering together to talk and eat. I am no proponent of organic farming, but I do support government getting minimalist involvement in interfering with people's lives.

    Sounds more like "big government gone mad" than anything else. While I wholly support food safety standards, the above reasons have nothing whatsoever to do with safeguarding consumable food standards tbh.
    Drives like an Asian till he gets behind the wheel of a holden

  6. Post
    #6
    Satire wrote:
    Yes this is a blog, no it isn't an isolated event.
    correlation != causation. This farm isn't a representative of the entire organic industry, just like how the Taco Bell food poisoning scare isn't a representative of the entire fast food industry.

  7. Post
    #7
    Quite suprised that some of you are defending this very personal intrusion.
    I believe organic farming is something we'll be seeing more of as oil and phosphorous prices rise, soil and beneficial microbial degradation continues, poverty increases and large populations in asia adopt our current agricultural standards. Do we really need to be punishing and discouraging individuals willing to try it themselve, here and now.

    massive wrote:
    Oh bull****, just go run 50km each day in bare feet it's really good for you Kenyans do it.
    So you're just going to take the piss out of something you know nothing about? Cool. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barefoot_running



    On a similar note to this thread, did that NZ food bill get passed?

  8. Post
    #8
    Amoki wrote:
    If the events are accurately reported, I disagree.

    On top of this being blatantly a private function instead of a retailing scenario - like-minded people (organic farming proponents) gathering together to talk and eat. I am no proponent of organic farming, but I do support government getting minimalist involvement in interfering with people's lives.

    Sounds more like "big government gone mad" than anything else. While I wholly support food safety standards, the above reasons have nothing whatsoever to do with safeguarding consumable food standards tbh.
    By his own admission the guests had "paid" to be at the dinner. It was not a private function. If he was charging people to attend then the guests had every right to expect he was following the local food health and safety regulations.

  9. Post
    #9
    refused wrote:
    I believe organic farming is something we'll be seeing more of
    I was under the impression that if we all went organic billions would starve to death. Is it not expensive and inefficient?

    I can vouch for bare foot running.

    As for this debacle, if these guys want to eat 'dangerous' food then let them. Seems a bit out of balance to come down on these people in the name of health when so many other dangerous activities are going on.

    lol 'that is not what god intended us to eat'. The couple from 4.30+ seem a little out of touch with reality.

  10. Post
    #10
    Soulsbane wrote:
    I was under the impression that if we all went organic billions would starve to death. Is it not expensive and inefficient?
    What do you call organic or non-organic?

    I don't agree with the black and white definition of "organic vs non-organic", what I mean is not all non-organic methods are equal.

    I don't see anything wrong with using traditional farming methods, ie: fertiliser, and pesticide for food production. The known carcinogenic sprays are banned in this country already.

    But I do not agree with GE seeds and seed patents for example (non-organic).

    At the moment I don't see anything wrong with farming in New Zealand using traditional methods.

    What will change the industry to a more "Americanised model" is an increase in land value, and land value will increase the more we open it up to foreign ownership. For most farmers farming is a lifestyle, but a large increase in farming land value would lead to more farming "investors", who do not understand farming at all and want their 10% return every year without fail, but they don't want to spend the money when it needs to be spent.

    If we want to see factory farming and GM farming in New Zealand all we have to do is open up the market to foreign ownership, and the rest will take care of itself.

  11. Post
    #11
    evidence wrote:
    By his own admission the guests had "paid" to be at the dinner. It was not a private function. If he was charging people to attend then the guests had every right to expect he was following the local food health and safety regulations.
    Would you call a cultural wedding (where guests have to "pay" to be at the dinner - e.g. Chinese) a non-private event as well by that definition? And was the event fee for-profit or non-profit/to cover cost?

    There is just way too much unknowns to call it a public event. On prima farcie acceptance what we do know and on the surface, it appears to be a private event for all intent and purpose, catered for private guests who's not just there for the meal, but to also socialise with the host.
    Drives like an Asian till he gets behind the wheel of a holden

  12. Post
    #12
    Soulsbane wrote:
    As for this debacle, if these guys want to eat 'dangerous' food then let them.
    And if the guests customers ended up with food poisoning, everyone would be claiming how the government failed to protect them.
    "The government knew this event was happening but they didn't send a health inspector! The democrats are trying to kill us all!"

  13. Post
    #13
    Denker wrote:
    And if the guests customers ended up with food poisoning, everyone would be claiming how the government failed to protect them.
    "The government knew this event was happening but they didn't send a health inspector! The democrats are trying to kill us all!"
    Surely we can treat people like grown ups and simply say "this is non regulation food, eat at your own risk". I'm sure what's left of the Indian tribes don't have to follow regulation. Food and how you grow/eat it should be a basic human right (so long as it does not impinge on others).

  14. Post
    #14
    Amoki wrote:
    Would you call a cultural wedding (where guests have to "pay" to be at the dinner - e.g. Chinese) a non-private event as well by that definition? And was the event fee for-profit or non-profit/to cover cost?

    There is just way too much unknowns to call it a public event. On prima farcie acceptance what we do know and on the surface, it appears to be a private event for all intent and purpose, catered for private guests who's not just there for the meal, but to also socialise with the host.
    A private function that is catered for is still subject to health and food requirements.

    There have been cases of severe e-coli poisoning related to organic food ( see here as an example: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/45326017...ckened-e-coli/ ), the US are clamping down on this and NZ will soon follow.

  15. Post
    #15
    Because nonorganic food never suffers from such bacteria..

  16. Post
    #16
    Vulcan wrote:
    There have been cases of severe e-coli poisoning related to organic food ( see here as an example: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/45326017...ckened-e-coli/ ), the US are clamping down on this and NZ will soon follow.
    Should America clamp down on all of its fast food as well, considering the Taco Bell poisoning mentioned earlier?

  17. Post
    #17
    My only gripe with so-called organic food is it's common name - calling it organic implies that any other food is inorganic, which clearly isn't the case.

    This case sounds like a bit of both TBH. Generally bad, but if strangers were able to pay to eat, I can see why the health department might get involved.

  18. Post
    #18
    Blue Vein CHEESE wrote:
    My only gripe with so-called organic food is it's common name - calling it organic implies that any other food is inorganic, which clearly isn't the case.
    That's more of a misconception created by the public rather than the organic industry, though.

  19. Post
    #19
    Crony capitalism seems to be running pretty wild in the US, the revolving door between big business and elected positions is quite alarming.

    Get elected (bank rolled by industry), slant laws in favour of industry/big business crowding out small/niche providers, later get a nice cushy job in big business/industry.

    Food production is heavily concentrated in the US in a small amount of large companies http://www.foodprocessing.com/top100/index.html, the revolving door between politics and industry is really alarming.

    With influence like this it's not surprising to see the US on a path will eventually lead to growing/eating your own food being banned for your own good of course.

    Not a food processor but a classic example is: Monsanto


  20. Post
    #20
    refused wrote:
    Because nonorganic food never suffers from such bacteria..
    The issue is that the govt is trying to put food safety standards in place that match regular food supplier requirements.

    Until now food safety around 'organic' foods has been fairly relaxed.

    Govt to 'Organic' food suppliers: "we want you to adhere to the same standards other food suppliers have too"
    Organic food suppliers: "waaaaaaaaaaaaa"