Results 26 to 50 of 80

  1. Post
    #26
    EzyE wrote:
    Primarily: Travel (while still young), then house, then kids.
    Ideally: Travel (while still young), then house, then kids, then my own business (doing ???).

    I don't want shitloads of cash, just enough to provide a comfortable life for me and mine, without having to worry about money.

    I've been heavily influenced by the environment I've been brought up in in that regard, with my parents having a successful business and financial stability, I've come to expect to be able to achieve the same for myself, which, at the moment, is an ungrounded expectation.
    I wouldn't seriously be considering Uni if these are your goals, unless there is a specific degree that would really get you up in the morning.

    Like others have said, save some cash and go traveling for a while, I haven't done it, but I wish I had.

  2. Post
    #27
    Coming from another person who grew up helping out and later helping to run their parents business... Do not study commerce, chances are you already know everything you need to know and a business degree won't help unless you want to get into accounting and or finance, I would strongly recommend you avoid it.

    If you want to get a solid, well paying job. Go study geology and then head to Australia and profit.

    p.s Go on an OE before you make the decision to study, seriously.

  3. Post
    #28
    Given you've been running a business, you may find a BCom a bit dull, also you shouldn't have too many problems getting a job post-uni given both your experience, and the evident maturity you show deciding to go to uni @ 24. I wouldn't say you need to be that mindful of what you study in regards to job prospects. If you're interested in a profession then go ahead, but you've had years of a job, don't pick a degree just to get a job.

    On that front, you may be able to exempt yourself from a few commerce points given your prior experience.

  4. Post
    #29
    zippy wrote:
    I wouldn't seriously be considering Uni if these are your goals, unless there is a specific degree that would really get you up in the morning.
    Can I ask why you say that?

    Part of me agrees with you, as if I was to do a degree right now, it would be solely for the purposes of making myself more employable, and to make a change in my life, not because I have an interest in the subject.



    Satire wrote:
    Coming from another person who grew up helping out and later helping to run their parents business... Do not study commerce, chances are you already know everything you need to know and a business degree won't help unless you want to get into accounting and or finance, I would strongly recommend you avoid it.

    If you want to get a solid, well paying job. Go study geology and then head to Australia and profit.

    p.s Go on an OE before you make the decision to study, seriously.
    Thanks for this, nice to hear from someone who has been where I am.

    I have considered geology. A few money-minded advisors from both here and Oz have suggested I head in the mining direction, even if only for a few years to save a decent whack of money and get myself a house before finding something else to do.

    te_chris wrote:
    Given you've been running a business, you may find a BCom a bit dull, also you shouldn't have too many problems getting a job post-uni given both your experience, and the evident maturity you show deciding to go to uni @ 24. I wouldn't say you need to be that mindful of what you study in regards to job prospects. If you're interested in a profession then go ahead, but you've had years of a job, don't pick a degree just to get a job.

    On that front, you may be able to exempt yourself from a few commerce points given your prior experience.
    Saint of Killers wrote:
    Yeah, that is a good point. Taking 3 - 6 months off and travelling and having fun will do you a world of good.

    I would not worry too much about the degree either, although one of the professional degrees would be better. The main point is that having run a business on your own, and having that practical experience will do you so much more good than any professional degree.
    It probably speaks of my mindset that you guys all view my work experience as a positive thing, where as I can only picture my CV with one employer in my adult work history, with no reliable referees because my superiors are my parents

  5. Post
    #30
    In the short term, moving to another part of the city might help you a little. Even the smallest change of scenery, be it a different suburb or a different type of house can help a bit.

    On degrees, if you're set on uni but don't know what to study, keep your options open as long as possible.

  6. Post
    #31
    EzyE wrote:
    ICan I ask why you say that?

    Part of me agrees with you, as if I was to do a degree right now, it would be solely for the purposes of making myself more employable, and to make a change in my life, not because I have an interest in the subject.
    Quite simply because none of your stated objectives require a degree.

    Degrees don't guarantee you anything and they're freaking expensive. Some professions, but not many require a degree. Experience is more important to most employers I've come across, experience in both life and the work.

  7. Post
    #32
    Oh yea I forgot to mention, I lived overseas for a year before I started studying.

    Go backpacking, start in Oz

  8. Post
    #33
    Blue Vein CHEESE wrote:
    In the short term, moving to another part of the city might help you a little. Even the smallest change of scenery, be it a different suburb or a different type of house can help a bit.

    On degrees, if you're set on uni but don't know what to study, keep your options open as long as possible.
    To be honest, if I decide to head overseas, I'd be doing it sooner rather than later, and so moving house would only complicate things. But if I decide to stick around, it could be an option.

    RedNZ wrote:
    Oh yea I forgot to mention, I lived overseas for a year before I started studying.

    Go backpacking, start in Oz
    Did your travels influence what you chose to study?

  9. Post
    #34
    EzyE wrote:
    Did your travels influence what you chose to study?
    Hard to say. Travelling just should be a necessity of life, because things will happen to you that you can never imagine, good or bad.

    You may find love and base the rest of your decisions around said person, or you may befriend an entrepreneur who offers you opportunities, or you may just find an easy job at a small shop/business and settle down in a distant town that suits you.

    Just sell everything you cant carry with you, lock up invaluable things somewhere, then take all your money with you and save just enough for a ticket home when the time comes.

    Its scary, but if I could do it by myself at 19, Im sure most people can, and the lessons you learn from it are priceless.

    Infact Im in need of a backpacking trip again to cure my cynicism.

  10. Post
    #35
    If you go to uni just use your first year to enrol in everything you like and try it all. Many people take 4 years just because the first year is used trying to decide what they actually like doing. Sure it can be expensive but you seriously don't want to get balls deep in a degree you realise you don't enjoy because you will probably hate uni.

    Also don't be put off by these BA bashes, maybe im bias but i enjoy it even though it might not lead to a direct employment opportunity like dentistry/doctors blah blah.

  11. Post
    #36
    I can't really give you specifics because a lot of that is up to you. As others have said, uni could be a waste unless its something more vocational because you're probably already competent at a range of commercial activities.

    As some overall advice, throw yourself at life and try and master what you do, whether that's something minor like cleaning your room, or something big. Don't get so caught up in needing to become anything or obtain anything because invariably no one ever really obtains their goals, they just keep moving on to something else.

    And yeah, travel does you good IMO.

  12. Post
    #37
    Would you consider seeing an career counsellor? A reputable one that is.

    The one I saw was great at identifying my strengths, and while I was already on the path that we settled on it was great to have the knowledge that I am actually suitable for that kind of work. Also, they tend to know where the jobs market is at.

  13. Post
    #38
    given youve been pretty much running a business on your own
    i suggest you skip uni and start your own business.

    ever thought of starting a brothel?

  14. Post
    #39
    lostminty wrote:
    Would you consider seeing an career counsellor? A reputable one that is.

    The one I saw was great at identifying my strengths, and while I was already on the path that we settled on it was great to have the knowledge that I am actually suitable for that kind of work. Also, they tend to know where the jobs market is at.
    I would, but I would need to sink a lot lower before doing it. At the moment I think I just need change, and the more I think about it the more attractive selling up and heading overseas seems.

    .THiNK.SPeAK. wrote:
    given youve been pretty much running a business on your own
    i suggest you skip uni and start your own business.

    ever thought of starting a brothel?
    You're probably joking, but I did consider it when the law changed. There always has been, and always will be money in sex.

    If I had a good idea, I'd do it, but at the moment the only ideas I have are a little grandiose.

  15. Post
    #40
    O.E. (as long as you like ... years, decades, whatever) simple as that and then come back realising NZ is the best little country around. It took me only 7 years

  16. Post
    #41


    I'm in the process of selling everything I own. I don't know where I'll go from there, and I don't think I've ever been more excited.

    Thank you all so much, without your input I'd still be floundering and unmotivated.

  17. Post
    #42
    That's some big balls dude. Any idea what u want to do there?

  18. Post
    #43
    bradc wrote:
    That's some big balls dude. Any idea what u want to do there?
    Intending on spending a few months in Chiang Mai learning Muay Thai and maybe finding a Thai language course, and travelling around a bit (Cambodia/Vietnam/Malaysia).

  19. Post
    #44
    Sounds cool dude

  20. Post
    #45
    Fly long, fly high, mate.

  21. Post
    #46
    You're like my life doppelganger.

    I'm very much the same with some minor differences (like already running my own business) however I have an empty CV because of this, done uni and dropped after the first year because I didn't really find anything at all to my liking and found I wasn't suited all too well to it either. My rather erratic work behaviour makes deadlines my enemy, hence self-employment. I've yet to find a passion for work thus far and will happily spend more time playing games and watching movies.

    I've been to Thailand a **** load for family and traveled to neighbouring countries. Yet to spark anything in me, back in NZ, again...

    ps. September is wet season. I generally go in September and last time my brothers car had a chance of floating away. And I nearly got stuck on a temple in Cambodia due to flooding while waiting for the sun set. So much excitement

    pps. good luck, saw those Qantas flights and thought about it

    ppps. drink beer the water is bad.

  22. Post
    #47
    Awesome mate, good on you, good luck Chiang Mai is a mint city, and nice and close to Laos and Burma too for mini missions there

  23. Post
    #48
    Saint of Killers wrote:
    Fly long, fly high, mate.

  24. Post
    #49
    I admit, I'm a little bit jealous

  25. Post
    #50
    you should continue to post on GP when your over there and take cool photos and stuff?