Results 1 to 11 of 11

  1. Post

    Posts in this thread appear as comments on the following Gameplanet article:

    Read article...

  2. Post
    #2
    It is a hard balance to crack, you see a lot of shit indie games on Steam/PS4 stores these days

  3. Post
    #3
    Bt wrote:
    It is a hard balance to crack, you see a lot of shit indie games on Steam/PS4 stores these days
    Need better quality control, something that threatens de-listing for games that have mostly negative reviews or something.

  4. Post
    #4
    As socialist scum, I'd like to see the gaming industry fund aspiring indie development (I mean it's in everyone's interests to have better / more varied talent entering the market) in a similar way as the telco industry is regulated to invest in the rural areas here in NZ.

    The TL;DR version is the biggest players (by revenue or net income) would have to put something up like $1 per 1000 in revenue/net income/units shipped/insert-your-metric-here to an independently-lead organisation, and they would fund good games and have the resources to vet / not-fund the terrible spam copy pasta bs etc.

    /hate me

  5. Post
    #5
    KrimzinZV wrote:
    Need better quality control, something that threatens de-listing for games that have mostly negative reviews or something.
    The review system's already been shown to be open to abuse, I don't think that would work very well.

  6. Post
    #6
    Robert Yang wrote:
    uhhh a $5000 fee per game would basically shut out students / small devs / experimental people from Steam forever?
    Not a bad thing. So many absolutely awful games made by students/'experimental' developers clogging up Steam makes it impossible to use the recommendations/queue feature these days.

  7. Post
    #7
    Celticknife wrote:
    Not a bad thing. So many absolutely awful games made by students/'experimental' developers clogging up Steam makes it impossible to use the recommendations/queue feature these days.
    ^This and I doubt it will be $5k, that's just a maximum that they listed.

  8. Post
    #8
    Celticknife wrote:
    Not a bad thing. So many absolutely awful games made by students/'experimental' developers clogging up Steam makes it impossible to use the recommendations/queue feature these days.
    Yup, we need less crap like Kim Jong Un Simulator.


  9. Post
    #9
    Im down with this. Although probably 1000 dollars is about right

  10. Post
    #10
    I agree that stricter quality control needs to be (re)introduced, but I don't think pay-gating releases is the way to do it, even though it would certainly be effective.

    What about, if a game fails to sell x copies in y days at a minimum of $z, then it gets delisted.
    The devs can then pay to get it relisted/release another game.
    It's a better system than using reviews, it discourages low-effort asset dumps, and it doesn't financially penalise 'genuine' indie developers. Although I guess if people are desperate enough they can just make multiple accounts and re-release games that don't make the cut, or something.

  11. Post
    #11
    iRoN wrote:
    As socialist scum, I'd like to see the gaming industry fund aspiring indie development (I mean it's in everyone's interests to have better / more varied talent entering the market) in a similar way as the telco industry is regulated to invest in the rural areas here in NZ.

    The TL;DR version is the biggest players (by revenue or net income) would have to put something up like $1 per 1000 in revenue/net income/units shipped/insert-your-metric-here to an independently-lead organisation, and they would fund good games and have the resources to vet / not-fund the terrible spam copy pasta bs etc.

    /hate me
    The only way you could ever get this to work is if the big boys would get something out of it. i.e. the independent organisation you mentioned becomes a silent investor in the game and profits go back to the donating companies. And i say donating because there is no way in hell you would be able to get them to fund competition otherwise.