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  1. Post
    #51
    Zarkov wrote:
    See my email.

    It's like you're holding that book hostage.

    It's on my card and the library is whipping me with penalty charges.
    Ok I looked at your email. You never told me you'd already renewed it twice, it's not my fault. I'll sort it out at the Birkenhead Library today.

  2. Post
    #52
    Quasi ELVIS wrote:
    Out of curiosity, what do Spanish people think of Mexicans? What're their accents like by comparison?
    The Spaniards have a pejorative term for Latin Americans, "sudacas," but she's friends with a few Spaniards and will be shown around a bit by them. There's probably been mutual dislike for colonisation reasons but it's more in the realm of friendly rivalry these days.

    There's no universal Iberian Spanish accent; in the north they use the "th" sound for Cs and Zs, whereas in Andalucia they don't. Andalucians clip their words like Argentines and Chileans do. Similarly there's no universal Mexican accent but it's the best one (read: easiest to follow), along with Central American countries and Colombia and Peru, since they enunciate their words and eliminate the pesky "vosotros" altogether.

  3. Post
    #53
    Tormenta wrote:
    There's no universal Iberian Spanish accent; in the north they use the "th" sound for Cs and Zs, whereas in Andalucia they don't.
    So it's like "Tharagoza" instead of "Zaragoza"? That's kind of how I imagine it being said properly anyway. I could probably get away with making a mess out of the pronunciation but she might need to put more effort into it for the locals. I'm always a lot more sympathetic with someone from China fumbling some English than I am with a North American or Western European being lazy. French people get notoriously shitty if you don't make an effort to pronounce French properly - it's common for them to just pretend they don't speak English if you make no effort. "Bonjour, Parlez vous anglais ?" goes a long way.

    Tormenta wrote:
    there's no universal Mexican accent
    I bet native Spanish speakers can tell the difference. The difference between Australian and NZ accents is very subtle but that doesn't mean it doesn't exist. I'm sure the difference between Mexican Spanish and Spanish Spanish is noticeable for those very familiar.


    Tormenta wrote:
    but it's the best one (read: easiest to follow), along with Central American countries and Colombia and Peru, since they enunciate their words and eliminate the pesky "vosotros" altogether.
    I know Catalonians in the north barely even consider themselves Spanish so there's a bit of friction there. I doubt every Spanish speaker in the world would agree that the Mexican accent is the "best one"; you might be a bit biased in that regard.

  4. Post
    #54
    Quasi ELVIS wrote:
    So it's like "Tharagoza" instead of "Zaragoza"? That's kind of how I imagine it being said properly anyway. I could probably get away with making a mess out of the pronunciation but she might need to put more effort into it for the locals. I'm always a lot more sympathetic with someone from China fumbling some English than I am with a North American or Western European being lazy. French people get notoriously shitty if you don't make an effort to pronounce French properly - it's common for them to just pretend they don't speak English if you make no effort. "Bonjour, Parlez vous anglais ?" goes a long way.
    Yeah I heard that about the French, probably holds true for a lot of non-English countries; the locals appreciate the effort made.

    Tharagotha ^_^

    I bet native Spanish speakers can tell the difference. The difference between Australian and NZ accents is very subtle but that doesn't mean it doesn't exist. I'm sure the difference between Mexican Spanish and Spanish Spanish is noticeable for those very familiar.
    It's immediately noticeable. My comment about different Mexican accents is my cousins in Sinaloa sound different than my inlaws in Nuevo Leon. The Mexico City accent is different again and is the default accent that the world associates with Mexico. Mexicans I'vet met have told me my Spanish sounds like I'm from Monterrey (where I studied, in the north)

    I know Catalonians in the north barely even consider themselves Spanish so there's a bit of friction there. I doubt every Spanish speaker in the world would agree that the Mexican accent is the "best one"; you might be a bit biased in that regard.
    Totes biased, it's the accent I learnt Spanish in. I maintain it's the most neutral though along with Central American countries, because they enunciate every syllable in the word; no clipping like Andalusians/Chileans/Argentines.
    Last edited by Tormenta; 7th May 2017 at 12:58 pm.

  5. Post
    #55
    Tormenta wrote:
    Tharagotha ^_^
    Sounds like a lisp.

    Tormenta wrote:
    Mexicans I'vet met have told me my Spanish sounds like I'm from Monterrey
    lol, whatever. I bet you sound like a FOB to them. Consider someone from Belgium or Amsterdam for example that speaks 100% perfect English... you can still tell where they're from as soon as they open their mouths. It's pretty much impossible to sound like you're from somewhere that you didn't spend a lot of time in.

    Tormenta wrote:
    Totes biased, it's the accent I learnt Spanish in. I maintain it's the most neutral though along with Central American countries, because they enunciate every syllable in the word; no clipping like Andalusians/Chileans/Argentines.
    I don't know much about Spanish but it seems likely it's the same as English and there's no real "neutral" accent. Even received pronunciation which is what God intended has a source and a style which only comes from ~1% of British people.

  6. Post
    #56
    Quasi ELVIS wrote:
    Out of curiosity, what do Spanish people think of Mexicans? What're their accents like by comparison?
    Spanish people sound like they've been hit in the face with a shovel.

  7. Post
    #57
    Quasi ELVIS wrote:
    I don't know much about Spanish but it seems likely it's the same as English and there's no real "neutral" accent. Even received pronunciation which is what God intended has a source and a style which only comes from ~1% of British people.
    Words on the left are how they say it in Argentina or Andalucia. On the right, how Mexicans say it/how God intended

    U'ted = Usted
    pue'to = puesto
    situacione dificile = situaciones dificiles
    corre'ponde = corresponde
    mucho aņo = muchos aņos

    It's better.

    lol, whatever. I bet you sound like a FOB to them.
    My Spanish esta de pocamadre. Here's me reading ye olde Spanish (Don Quixote) but sounding like a Mexican


  8. Post
    #58
    Go to Mars

  9. Post
    #59
    coolangatta, land of the crocodiles

  10. Post
    #60
    Bolivia