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  1. Cool
    #1
    So your Xbox 360 has suffered the inevitable Red Ring of Death error – RROD as we call it, or “General Hardware Failure” as Xbox support call it.

    First of all – SORRY. Really, I mean it. And so does Xbox support. Remember to count the number of times the CSR says “sorry”. But as an “Xbox enthusiast” (that’s company-lingo), Microsoft would like to assure you that they will help you in your quest to repair your console.

    Under NZ Law (the Consumer Guarantees Act 1993), the retailer from whom you purchased the Xbox 360 from is responsible for supplying a remedy for your problem. However when they are approached, you will be told that you have to deal with Microsoft Xbox Support yourself. You may wish to pursue your rights under the CGA with the retailer, and the process may take a little longer. If you are happy to deal with Xbox Support yourself, or if you have a second hand console, then the following 20 point guide should answer most of your questions you might have about the full process.

    1. Establish that you do indeed have the official RROD and not some other error which might also cause your Xbox 360 not to work. Your 360 when powered on should have three lights flashing red on the Ring of Light. When you look at your Xbox 360, the only light that is not flashing red should be at the top-right. This is *regardless* of your console’s vertical or horizontal orientation. So if you change the orientation, the pattern will reconfigure itself so that the top-right light is not flashing.

    2. Common “non-RROD” errors are FOUR flashing red lights (indicating an AV error such as a faulty AV cable or connection), and a single flashing red light with the error code “E74” being displayed. The former error is usually a simple fix by checking that cables are connected properly, while the latter if confirmed with troubleshooting will require a repair that is not covered by the 3 year “RROD” warranty. You may wish to pursue any rights you have under the Consumer Guarantees Act if you are not happy to pay for the repair at a flat rate of $130 USD (this figure is not confirmed)

    3. To help confirm the RROD, turn off your console and remove all accessories from your console such as the HDD, memory cards, wired controllers, wireless network adapters, and HD-DVD drives. The only connections to the 360 now should be the AV cable and the power cable. Look for a light on your power supply – this should glow orange. Now turn the console back on and see if you get the same error lights again. If you get the same flashing red lights as before, and your power supply light now glows green, you are well on your way to confirming a RROD.

    4. If you wish to further determine that your three flashing red lights is really the infamous “RROD”, you can hold down the controller sync button on the front of the console and press the eject button four times. Each time that you press the eject button, note down how many quadrants flash. If you have the true RROD then the quadrants will flash 4 times with the first press, 1 time with the second, 4 times with the third, and 2 times with the fourth.

    5. Once you have established that you have a RROD, you should qualify for a free of charge repair from Microsoft. I say “should”, because depending on the CSR you talk to on the phone, you may be told that as a second hand owner of the Xbox 360, you are not covered by this extended warranty programme. The extended warranty refers to the 3 year warranty Microsoft now offers for RROD faults only, which applies from the date of purchase of the console, or where this cannot be proven, the date of manufacturing (which is printed on the back of the conxole).

    6. You may choose to initiate your repair online at http://service.xbox.com by registering your console (if not already done) and then submitting a request for repair. This will not work if you have a second hand console and the previous owner has already registered your console to themselves. You will require your 12-digit Xbox 360 serial number which can be found on the back of your console, or at the front under the flap which conceals the two USB ports.

    7. If your Xbox was registered by a previous owner, or you prefer to listen to hold music and talk to people from other cultures, you can phone Xbox Support on 0508 555 592 between 9am and 9pm Monday to Friday, or 9am to 5pm on weekends. The phone number does not spell out any words on your keypad so you’ll have to write it down or commit it to memory.

    8. Press 1 for Xbox 360 support, and then press 2 for “game console” support. Have your Xbox serial number and your patience ready. Your CSR will ask for your first and last names to log the call, and then after explaining your problem you will receive your first “sorry” followed by a reassurance that MS is there to look after you. The CSR may now try to troubleshoot your problem to confirm the RROD. Because you have already taken all the steps above, at this point you can explain to the agent everything you have tried which should save you some time.

    9. Once it is established that you have a RROD that qualifies for the extended warranty repair, you will be asked for details to lodge this claim. This is where you may be told that the Xbox 360 has already been registered to someone else. You will be asked how you came to acquire the 360, and if you are dealing with a nice and reasonable CSR, they will then allow you to change the details to your own after you tell them that you have purchased the console second hand. It may help to know the first and last name, and maybe even address of the first registered owner, if you have these details.

    10. After being placed on hold several times during this process, you will then be told to expect an email within 48 hours with further details and shipping labels. You may be told to expect an empty box to be sent to you in the mail for you to return your Xbox 360 in – don’t believe it as this does not happen in New Zealand. You will then be given a reference number which you should write down carefully.

    11. Next you wait for your email to arrive, which may take some time or never arrive at all. You will need to contact Xbox support again if it does not arrive within 48 hours. The email will contain details about how to package your Xbox 360 for shipping, and include 2 shipping labels. You will use the Freepost one if you do not wish to pay for shipping (this is untracked), or the non-Freepost one if you wish to pay for a courier and have the package tracked.

    12. Before you pack your Xbox 360, open the DVD drive and make sure to remove any disc that remains. Then you should turn off the consoles and remove all accessories – that includes the faceplate, HDD, AV cable, power cable, and any USB accessories. Ensure that your warranty seal sticker on the front of your Xbox under the faceplate is intact. If this is broken/removed, Microsoft will refuse to touch your console as the implication is that your console has been modded. Do NOT send any accessories along with your console unless it has been specifically requested by the CSR.

    13. If you are that way inclined, you may wish to document your adventures by taking photos or videos of your Xbox – with the front page of a recent newspaper if that’s important to you. Particular things you may wish to document are the 3 red lights flashing, your warranty seal sticker, and your console warranty number. If you are interested in what will happen to your DVD drive, you can mark it (eg. scratch with a sharp object) in a discreet location, making sure that it will not interfere with the drive’s function. That way you will be able if your DVD drive gets replaced.

    14. It is recommended that you wrap the console in a plastic bag, and then it should be packed in a suitable cardboard box using bubble wrap or other material to ensure a snug fit. Print your choice of shipping address label and write your service request number and full name on the label in the spaces provided. Then attach it to the outer box and send this off at NZ Post for Freepost or CourierPost, or at your choice or courier company.

    15. Your repair process can be tracked at http://service.xbox.com which tells you that your console will go through 4 stages, and that the status will be updated to tell you the stage you have reached. The stages are:

    i) Repair order submitted – you have requested the repair but are still waiting for your email to arrive

    ii) Waiting for device at service center – the email has been sent, and they are now waiting for your Xbox 360 to arrive (ignore the information telling you that an empty box will be sent to you – this does not apply in NZ)

    iii) Device received at service center – your Xbox 360 has arrived and they require “up to two business days to repair or replace your console”

    iv) Device shipped to customer – self explanatory. You now receive email confirmation along with a tracking number

  2. Post
    #2
    16. This tracking means very little in practice, and there are some reports from people that have received their repaired consoles without the status ever changing through all of the four stages. Consoles are all received in Auckland, and then shipped to Australia in bulk on Tuesdays and Thursdays (as far as we are aware from the information publicly deduced). That means that if your console arrives on Thursday to Auckland, it may not be shipped to Australia where it will be repaired until the following Tuesday. “Device received at service center” may never update, or it may do sometime after it arrives in Australia. Furthermore, you may receive an automated reminder email from Xbox Support saying that they have not yet received your console, even though you might have sent it to them over a week ago.

    17. Once your console has shipped from the service center, you should receive an email with a tracking number. Again you will need to wait for your console to come back to New Zealand, before being shipped to your address. As at May 2008, you will be issued with a CourierPost track and trace number in the format: SL xxx xxx xxx NZ. This is a number which can be tracked at www.courierpost.co.nz but some have reported that received their consoles before it was ever trackable on this website. CourierPost say that even though your Xbox is assigned that particular tracking number, it may not even be in New Zealand yet. On arrival to New Zealand your Xbox becomes trackable once it has been scanned at least once by a CourierPost scanner.

    18. When you sign for your console (delivery is by signature only courier, so a card to call is supposed to be left if no-one is home to sign for it), you are signing to say that you are happy with your package and that you are forfeiting all claims for compensation for damage, etc. Sounds crazy I know, but it is one of those quirky archaic New Zealand laws. To protect yourself from this (in case there is any concealed damage to your console that is not immediately apparent by looking at the box), make sure that your write “subject to inspection” or “STI” when you sign for it. That means that you are reserving your waiver of rights until you have inspected the contents.

    19. Inside the box along with your console, you should have received a complimentary 1 month Gold subscription to Xbox Live, along with a letter (saying sorry, and addressed to “Xbox enthusiast”). There is also a survey form if you wish to rate Xbox Customer Support. If you have received a refurbished console, apparently this should be clearly indicated to you. The box that your Xbox was shipped in provides good protection for the console so you may wish to keep it for the next time it breaks down.


    20. Enjoy your repaired/refurbished console.


    Estimated time-line:

    Day 1 - Registering your repair request

    Day 2-3 - Receiving the email from Xbox support with shipping labels

    Day 5-10 - Presuming that you send it off as soon as you get the labels, and use the standard NZ Post service, and assuming a 2-3 day standard NZ post delivery time, your console will probably leave Auckland between day 5 and day 10, depending on which days the consoles get mass-shipped to Australia.

    About 2 weeks down the track, expect to receive the "your console has been shipped back to you email". Then within a week of that email, expect to have your console back to your home. The total process as at May 2008 seems to average 2-3 weeks.

  3. Post
    #3
    Comments/suggestions/corrections welcome.

  4. Post
    #4
    Shot Ahmad this thread SHOULD be stickied.

  5. Post
    #5
    Pulley wrote:
    Shot Ahmad this thread SHOULD be stickied.
    QFT, so tired of seeing a new thread each week about how its the end of the world that 'my' 360 has died and maybe if i make a thread even though theres one a few threads down from my new one, zomg.

    Sticky

  6. Post
    #6
    Pulley wrote:
    I thought it was a good post since a lot of people new and old post a new thread on what to do.

    Very detailed. You don't even have to read it, I didn't, I just scanned it for the general information I would want if I was new and knew nothing about RROD.

    Shot Ahmad this thread SHOULD be stickied.
    Hey thanks Pulley. It *is* detailed, and that's for a reason.

    I wanted it to be a "definitive" guide on the entire process from start to finish so that it would answer most questions people had about every stage of the process. It's not intended for people who don't want to know, or just want to phone Xbox support.

  7. Post
    #7
    Lol i just turned my xbox on and got the red light

    this post JINXED ME!

    ffs ,


    i cant request a repair online its BS

    its not 2nd hand

  8. Post
    #8
    vo|ati|e wrote:
    Lol i just turned my xbox on and got the red light

    this post JINXED ME!
    Ah damn man Sorry!

  9. Post
    #9
    ive got 2 mnths off work in 3 days time no 360!

    when i do the Sync eject trick i get 4, 4, 2, 4 ?

  10. Post
    #10
    vo|ati|e wrote:
    ive got 2 mnths off work in 3 days time no 360!

    when i do the Sync eject trick i get 4, 4, 2, 4 ?
    According to a cheap Google search, http://www.llamma.com/xbox360/repair...rror-codes.htm says that you have code:

    0020 (Not yet known, possibly overheating)

    In terms of error codes, flashing 4 times is a "0", once is a "1", twice a "2", thrice a "3".

    I got the info for the lights from faranheit so he may care to comment on how useful getting an error code is for confirming the problem and whether it is the dreaded "RROD".

  11. Post
    #11
    YEP

    0001 - Power Supply Problem
    0002 - Power Supply Problem
    0003 - (not yet known)

    0010 - Over Heating
    0011 - Over Heating
    0012 - Over Heating
    0013 - Over Heating

    0020 - not yet known, possibly overheating
    0021 - not yet known
    0022 - GPU Error / GPU Overheating

    0101 - not yet known
    0102 - unknown error*

    0110 - Memory Error / Memory Overheating

    1003 - Hard Drive Error**

    1010 - Hard Drive Error, Can be caused buy a currupt or missing Eprom.

    1013 - not yet known

    1020 - not yet known

    1022 AV cable error***

    1030 - not yet known

    Damn it, ill ring them tomoro i expect to be on da fone for a while.

  12. Post
    #12
    Good luck man, the whole process took just over 2 weeks for me and that seems to be the average at the moment.

  13. Post
    #13
    Nice ahmad

    Up to step 14 or so!

    Might want to add how long the progress takes? 2-4 weeks?

    Screenshot of repair stages:

  14. Post
    #14
    Good thread. Cleaned out some of the more unnecessary posts and stickied

    Edit: Let's try and keep it relatively spam free, huh?

  15. Post
    #15
    Good FAQ on the process ahmad. I would like to see pointed out somewhere that you do not have to use this process. Your legal rights to return faulty products to the retailer you purchased from are covered in the Consumer Gauranatees Act 1993. The retailer then can follow this process on your behalf.

    Slower, yes, but it is still your choice as a consumer as to how you choose to seek remedy.

  16. Post
    #16
    Grolim wrote:
    I would like to see pointed out somewhere that you do not have to use this process.
    Added, cheers:
    Under NZ Law (the Consumer Guarantees Act 1993), the retailer from whom you purchased the Xbox 360 from is responsible for supplying a remedy for your problem. However when they are approached, you will be told that you have to deal with Microsoft Xbox Support yourself. You may wish to pursue your rights under the CGA with the retailer, and the process may take a little longer. If you are happy to deal with Xbox Support yourself, or if you have a second hand console, then the following 20 point guide should answer most of your questions you might have about the full process.

  17. Post
    #17
    vo|ati|e wrote:
    ive got 2 mnths off work in 3 days time no 360!

    when i do the Sync eject trick i get 4, 4, 2, 4 ?
    0020 in my experience is GPU related just like the more common 0102. It qualifies you for a free repair and you don't have to know this code or tell anyone from MS about it.

  18. Post
    #18
    Rang up... got through straight away.
    Got an email immediately...

    now just have to decide weather to free post or courier?

    i have alot of Overnight courier post bags can i put it in that and put the address slip on it? as long as it fits in a box?

    do they send it back in whatever u sent it to them in?

  19. Post
    #19
    vo|ati|e wrote:
    Rang up... got through straight away.
    Got an email immediately...

    now just have to decide weather to free post or courier?

    i have alot of Overnight courier post bags can i put it in that and put the address slip on it? as long as it fits in a box?

    do they send it back in whatever u sent it to them in?
    Yeh i got the same box back, it was just a suitable sized box WITH PADDING, paid like 20 bucks for bubble wrap / box / postage, got it a week later, overnight wont really matter to be honest, they will still take a look at it one at a time pending on the amount of 360's that have come through, it also travels overseas from NZ to Australia?

  20. Post
    #20
    You got yours back in 1 week? Madness.

    Freepost or courier depends on how rich or paranoid you are

    And I didn't get my Arnott's biscuit box back. I'm lead to believe that you get a standard plain box that contains a couple of foam packaging inserts that protect the Xbox on its journey back to you. I don't know how you get your packaging back Slayer. Did you use some other process via EB Games or something?

  21. Post
    #21
    I just got that email saying they aint received my console yet!

    i sent it like a week and a half ago

  22. Post
    #22
    How long after logging the repair did you send it and on what day day of the week did you send it?

  23. Post
    #23
    16. This tracking means very little in practice, and there are some reports from people that have received their repaired consoles without the status ever changing through all of the four stages. Consoles are all received in Auckland, and then shipped to Australia in bulk on Tuesdays and Thursdays (as far as we are aware from the information publicly deduced). That means that if your console arrives on Thursday to Auckland, it may not be shipped to Australia where it will be repaired until the following Tuesday. “Device received at service center” may never update, or it may do sometime after it arrives in Australia. Furthermore, you may receive an automated reminder email from Xbox Support saying that they have not yet received your console, even though you might have sent it to them over a week ago.

  24. Post
    #24
    the very next day which was a Friday so guess that means it would be shipped on Tues?

    i dunno

    just want my 360 back, wii is just gay

  25. Post
    #25
    Yip. It more or less would have spent Fri, Sat, Sun and Mon going nowhere.