Adventures with a Weber BBQ

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  1. Post
    #26
    Merkinz wrote:
    I use Heat beads and love them. you can get Cadac lup charcoal (alien wood from Namibia) from Mitre 10 or bunnings ... I forget (maybe both!!!). I reccomend if you flavor but te lumps vary HUGELY in size!

    Grolim: God DAMN that looks good. you seem to have timed the viegies and the chicken really well! looks amazing

    Thats alot of coals in there! How hot was it? over 200C?
    Think I got some of those Cadac ones last week. Brands I see always seem to change.

    Yeah a decent amount of coals. Maybe 35 lit ones poured on top of a few handfuls that were unlit and left over from the last cook. I do that a lot - just rotate the next cook with new lit ones on top after brushing off the old ones to remove the ash. Was running at about 275C Nice crispy skin!

  2. Post
    #27
    Grolim wrote:
    Yeah a decent amount of coals. Maybe 35 lit ones poured on top of a few handfuls that were unlit and left over from the last cook. I do that a lot - just rotate the next cook with new lit ones on top after brushing off the old ones to remove the ash. Was running at about 275C Nice crispy skin!
    275.C !!! Damn thats hot! ... Not too hot??? O_o

    I'm planning on replicating your "classic chook" this weekend! ... do you add smoking chips again after you put the vegies in? ... whats that like?
    Any other tips / hints? I'm having guests so I gotta nail it first time! ;P

    Will post pics ...

  3. Post
    #28
    Woah epic barbecue is epic!

  4. Post
    #29
    Yeah it was about 275 C at the lid vents which is generally around 40-50 C higher than the temp at the grate level in a Weber. High heat makes the skin go awesome crispy.

    I usually chuck a small handful of more chips on when the veg go in. When the veg go on it's the only time I lift the lid until the end where I check the temp of the chicken.

    Make sure the chicken is close to room temp before putting it on the bbq, take it out of the fridge a couple of hours before hand.

    If you want it perfect you can try folding the wings under the body and putting some foil over the top parts of the leg for the 2nd half of the cook. They tend to dry out a little as they are more exposed, but I never bother as kids and wife like crispy bits.

    Butter between skin and breast is awesome for making sure breast meat is not overdone by the time the thigh (which takes the longest to cook) is done.

    Have fun man, post pics!

  5. Post
    #30
    The maillard reaction (browning, crispyness) occurs above about 160-70ish, 275 sounds mental
    (not to doubt your method, but damn)

  6. Post
    #31
    Yes that's right, but it's all about time at temp. If you cook it at 160-170 then you will get browning on the skin but the meat will dry out more easily. And as I said 275 at the lid which is about 40-50 hotter than the temp at the food level.

  7. Post
    #32
    How are you measuring that temp difference without removing the lid?

  8. Post
    #33
    I have a thermometer that sits inside on the grill and I can read it as soon as I lift the lid. I also sometimes use a probe thermometer that has 2 probes, one goes in the meat and the other sits at grill level, wires come out to main unit and that also transmits to a handheld remote that you can set alarm temps for to tell you when your food is done while you're busy drinking

  9. Post
    #34
    I made a mean chook on sunday in the Weber, I made it like you said Grolim vegies and all and it came out great! I lay down a bed of unlit coals and then tipped 35 lit briquettes ontop of them but I still didn't get the temp (at the top vent) above about 210`C.

    I had quite a hectic weekend cause I'm living in Nelson so I totally forgot to photos of the cook! ... so here are a couple of photos I took on my weekend anyway:




  10. Post
    #35
    Holy shitballs


    I'll be firing up the coals this christmas. Need a weber though, shit they look good. I'm using an el cheapo bbq. It works pretty well but the weber just looks so professional.

  11. Post
    #36
    Grolim wrote:
    I have a thermometer that sits inside on the grill and I can read it as soon as I lift the lid. I also sometimes use a probe thermometer that has 2 probes, one goes in the meat and the other sits at grill level, wires come out to main unit and that also transmits to a handheld remote that you can set alarm temps for to tell you when your food is done while you're busy drinking
    Ah nice, now in addition to BBQ envy i've got thermometer envy :P
    Where'd you get it from? I've had enough trouble finding a decent instant read one let alone a model you can leave in.

    And I have to admit I was picturing you using a instant read at the vent, then whipping the lid off and taking a 2nd reading hah

  12. Post
    #37
    Geez Merkinz, that's some crazy weather! In regards to your temp on the chook cook, did you have all the vents fully open? I think the reason mine got so high is that my new blue kettle has a slight out of round problem so more air gets in as the lid doesn't quite fit right. Plus I was using some new briquettes made from coconut shell which run pretty hot - a full weber chimney of them. Doesn't really matter though, you don't need it that hot, as your results sound mint.

    Deadm3at - got the Maverick ET-73, from Amazon.com. Got a decent instant read one as well. They didn't ship to NZ on those items so used shipito.com to forward them. I actually bought a few of them and flicked some off on Tardme for a small profit to help cover some costs

  13. Post
    #38
    Grolim wrote:
    Geez Merkinz, that's some crazy weather! In regards to your temp on the chook cook, did you have all the vents fully open? I think the reason mine got so high is that my new blue kettle has a slight out of round problem so more air gets in as the lid doesn't quite fit right. Plus I was using some new briquettes made from coconut shell which run pretty hot - a full weber chimney of them. Doesn't really matter though, you don't need it that hot, as your results sound mint.
    Yeah I was definately pleased with my result! ... weekend and the last few days have been mad trying to get people back into their houses after the destruction.

    Grolim wrote:
    Deadm3at - got the Maverick ET-73, from Amazon.com. Got a decent instant read one as well. They didn't ship to NZ on those items so used shipito.com to forward them. I actually bought a few of them and flicked some off on Tardme for a small profit to help cover some costs
    Good thermometer and they DO ship to NZ straight off amazon! Thats where I got mine on your recommendation. Even came in the Amazon box and all.

    One downside to this thermometer is that the "wireless fucnction is practically useless. Mine loses signal in less than 10m in line of sight. But it doesn't bother me too much great for the longer cooks and knowing when your chicken is ripe!

  14. Post
    #39
    Xmas eve, a quick smoke roasted venison rump and veg:


    Didn't use the Webers for xmas day lunch this year. Last year i hauled them over to the in-laws and did the ham, turkey, and salmon in them. This year I just did the ham and a roast of a whole beef sirloin in their big hooded gasser. Should have got a pic but was too busy and hungry

  15. Post
    #40
    Epic Grolim! Looks amazing!

    I'm going to try the pulled pork again this weekend but I'm a bit unsure how I should go about it this time. The last time it wasn't as "tender" as I imagined it would be. But seeing I've never had pulled pork before elsewhere I have no reference point. Should I leave it in there for a bit longer once it hits 90C ? Will that make it more tender?

  16. Post
    #41
    ... also if santa bought anyone here a charcoal grill then this site is worth checking out for ideas:

    LINK

  17. Post
    #42
    How long did you foil and rest it for?
    I haven't done PP yet but I haven't seen anyone taking it higher than about 90.
    Maybe give brining it a shot?

  18. Post
    #43
    I rested it for 2 hours wrapped in foil, towel and in a chilly bin... definately long enough.

  19. Post
    #44
    For sure.
    Maybe cook it to temp, then check how pull-able it is before foiling? It won't dry out with an extra 5 or 10c so you could go with your gut and just use the temp as a guide.
    Were you doing bone in or out?

    edit:
    what were the details of your last cook? meat weight, cook time, snake or minion? I'm curious because i'm super keen to do PP on the kettle.

  20. Post
    #45
    You can see a pic of the charcoal snake method setup on the previous page. It was running a little on the hot side (upto 120C ... was aiming for 105C) so I'll thin the coals a little next time I think. I think the pork weighed about 2.5 + kg cook time was a little shy of 8 hours (plus an extra 2 hours rest time).

    Was using a two probe digi thermometer and couldn't live without it now!!!

    I'm using a different rub this time but I don't think that it will have much effect on "tenderness".

    EDIT: also it was bone in! ALWAYS bone in! More flavour!

  21. Post
    #46
    Heh duuh, I didn't think to look at page 1...
    You could try putting some water in the drip pan, that'll help lock in that lower temp. Whether the steam adds any moisture to the meat seems to be highly debatable.
    Since 2.5kg is relatively small (at least by yank standards) it may be worth finishing the butt in foil for the last hour or two, maybe even toss in a bit of apple juice. It works for ribs after all.

    Bone in Doing some chicken thighs tomorrow that wouldn't be the same boned.

  22. Post
    #47
    Deadm3at wrote:
    Heh duuh, I didn't think to look at page 1...
    You could try putting some water in the drip pan, that'll help lock in that lower temp. Whether the steam adds any moisture to the meat seems to be highly debatable.
    Since 2.5kg is relatively small (at least by yank standards) it may be worth finishing the butt in foil for the last hour or two, maybe even toss in a bit of apple juice. It works for ribs after all.

    Bone in Doing some chicken thighs tomorrow that wouldn't be the same boned.
    Yeah I'm not 100% on the whole apple juice thing. Is it proven to work? I picked up a butt today. About 3kg this time

  23. Post
    #48
    Love pulled pork! It can be a tricky one to get right though, it took me a few attempts.

    Biggest thing is cut of meat. Americans use "butt" which is actually the top of the shoulder and the neck. The closest we have here is called pork scotch fillet or sometimes called pork neck roast. I have to ask the butchers for it specifically. It's what they usually cut up into pork scotch fillet steaks. The ones I get vary from 1.5 - 2.5kg (they have no bone). I suspect the cut you may be getting is a shoulder roast? I haven't been able to get a good result with that. You can, but you really need all the intra-muscular fat that is up in the neck and hard to come across a good looking shoulder.

    The temps you had seem fine to me. I usually hit 90c after about 9 hours cooking at 107c for a 2.2kg piece of meat.

    Each piece of meat is very different, some take 7 hours others 11. Drive the wife nuts if we are planning a dinner time

    Foiling during the cook for an hour or 2 with a little apple juice may be a good idea. I've never done PP in the kettle, only the WSM and I don't foil, but i think as the kettle is a drier environment it may help. Don't go too long though or you risk making it mushy.

    You could also add a big foil tray or 2 with water in it under the meat. This will help moisture wise and also be a good heat sink enabling stable temps. You'd have to check the water levels and add more hot water every few hours though. You'd also want slightly more hot coals (fatter snake) or more airflow to balance the temp at 105-110 if using water.

    Resting - I've done as little as 15mins and up to 2 hours and it hasn't really made much of a difference. usually I go for 30-40mins.

    Good luck man!

    nom noms:

  24. Post
    #49
    Grolim wrote:
    Love pulled pork! It can be a tricky one to get right though, it took me a few attempts.

    Biggest thing is cut of meat. Americans use "butt" which is actually the top of the shoulder and the neck. The closest we have here is called pork scotch fillet or sometimes called pork neck roast. I have to ask the butchers for it specifically. It's what they usually cut up into pork scotch fillet steaks. The ones I get vary from 1.5 - 2.5kg (they have no bone). I suspect the cut you may be getting is a shoulder roast? I haven't been able to get a good result with that. You can, but you really need all the intra-muscular fat that is up in the neck and hard to come across a good looking shoulder.

    The temps you had seem fine to me. I usually hit 90c after about 9 hours cooking at 107c for a 2.2kg piece of meat.

    Each piece of meat is very different, some take 7 hours others 11. Drive the wife nuts if we are planning a dinner time

    Foiling during the cook for an hour or 2 with a little apple juice may be a good idea. I've never done PP in the kettle, only the WSM and I don't foil, but i think as the kettle is a drier environment it may help. Don't go too long though or you risk making it mushy.

    You could also add a big foil tray or 2 with water in it under the meat. This will help moisture wise and also be a good heat sink enabling stable temps. You'd have to check the water levels and add more hot water every few hours though. You'd also want slightly more hot coals (fatter snake) or more airflow to balance the temp at 105-110 if using water.

    Resting - I've done as little as 15mins and up to 2 hours and it hasn't really made much of a difference. usually I go for 30-40mins.

    Good luck man!
    Damn it! I just spent $40 on a massive sholder roast! ... It is freerange so hopefully it is better than your usual supermarket slop!

    So if I DO foil it do I do it at the end of the cook or at the start???

    Ta

  25. Post
    #50
    At the end, at the start is when you're forming up the smoke ring.

    You could do a modified 3-2-1 rib style cook perhaps (with appropriate time adjustments), in that case it's 3 hours unfoiled, 2 foiled, 1 unfoiled to finish.

    On the more extreme end you could try using one of those meat injectors, it seems a number of people entering competitions go that route.

    Good luck with the cook