Adventures with a Weber BBQ

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  1. Post
    #1

    Adventures with a Weber BBQ

    Well Grolim and linkdown inspired me to buy a Weber kettle BBQ and get me grill on. I've had a good gas BBQ for a couple of years now but never really got into the Kiwi style of barbecuing:
    Turn on gas > burn sausages > eat.

    First thing I did in the Weber was ribs and it was an EPIC failure that I don't want to talk about EVER again

    But the last two weekends I managed to cook a couple of things I've never done on a BBQ before. This weekend I did a Pulled Pork (slow smoke roasted pork shoulder roast) and the weekend before I made pizzas in the BBQ (Could never do this with my gas one!).

    PULLED PORK:

    Got myself a nice big pork shoulder (about 3 kg). Cut the skin off and seasoned with a basic rub:






    Set the coals up in a "snake" and put some wood chips on top for smoke. I like 12 coals and put them at one end and the fire walked across the snake. Water pan in there too. I had two thermometers in there: one monitoring the temp of the "oven" temperature, the other monitoring the internal temp of the meat. I was aiming for an oven temperature of 105 C and meat was going to come off once it hit 90 C.






    The coals were buring a little hot (got up to 128 C in there at one point) so I had to adjust the air vents a couple of time to bring it down. Meat is cooked in this photo ... just shy of 8 hours and you can see the coals on the left are all burned out but there is still plenty of furl on the right, even after 8 hours! I wrapped up the pork and let it rest for 2 hours in a chilli bin (to keep it warm). Then it was pullin time!!!





    PIZZAS:

    This was fairly straight forward: Prop a pizza stone up in the BBQ (I used an upturned ceramic pot saucer to lift it a little, might try something different next time) dump a HEAP of hot coals around the edges, heat the whole lot up for a bit and then slide your pizzas in. Once I put the pizzas on I threw a few wood chips in to give it that smokey wood fired taste It was a great success but I think next time I'll try get it a bit hotter which will be easy case I didn't quite get all the coals lit. I was a bit impatient













    And that is that! .... I have a TON of leftover pork today too! ;P

  2. Post
    #2
    mean looking pizzas dude, looks perfectly cooked without any burning on edges/top etc

  3. Post
    #3
    pork on teh pizza nom nom

    looks excellent I wish I had friends like you to cook epic smokey bbqs

  4. Post
    #4
    fryd wrote:
    I wish I had friends like you to cook epic smokey bbqs
    same, i cant cook for shiz........

  5. Post
    #5
    Holy elaborate charcoal! Never seen that done.

    The pork looks mean, that pizza could do with another minute or so imo, love the slightly burnt bits!

    What temperature did you cook the pork to?

  6. Post
    #6
    I own a Weber too! The are beasts! I had a first use fail as well (took well over a hour to get it going).

    How come you used easy lighting coals?? Real charcoal or nothing br4 !!!

    I will have to show my dear lady this thread for more inspiration!

  7. Post
    #7
    NiNjA-Keeley wrote:
    I own a Webber too! The are beasts! I had a first use fail as well (took well over a hour to get it going).

    How come you used easy lighting coals?? Real charcoal or nothing br4 !!!

    I will have to show my dear lady this thread for more inspiration!

    Use one of those chimney things, it will take 15 minutes or so to get all the coals lit.

  8. Post
    #8
    I have a Chimney starter (purchased post bad lighting exp). We took the bbq to a mates place for a Turkish food night.... it was banging good. I'll strive to get some wicked cool bbq pics when we are cooking next!

  9. Post
    #9
    Top stuff mate!

    That pork looks mint. The snake method worked a treat. Beauty is you only use the min coals needed and have left overs so it's pretty efficient. I think if you dropped the top layer it wouldn't run as hot.

    The pork cut looks pretty much the same as the "pork scotch fillet" I was talking about. Left over pulled pork sandwiches are godly

    Gonna have to get my pizza on soon. Bought a couple of pizza paddles to put to use.

    Nice thread idea too, will post up some pics of my next cook if I remember to take some before gutsing it all.

  10. Post
    #10
    NiNjA-Keeley wrote:
    How come you used easy lighting coals?? Real charcoal or nothing br4 !!!
    Real charcoal is great but it burns hotter and quicker than briquettes, making it less useful for slow cooking.

    I tend to use charcoal for fish/poultry (esp. smoking), and briquettes for beef, pork or lamb.

  11. Post
    #11
    Yeah lump charcoal is good for fast high heat cooking and briquettes for low and slow. Heat Beads brand are by far the best, though I have managed to get some coconut husk based ones recently that I was impressed by. Just steer clear of the "easy-lite" heat beads in the yellow bags, they have petro-chemicals added that can taint your food if not careful. Stick with the red bags.

    I used lump charcoal for steak, seafood, chops etc and briquettes for roasting. Sometimes I use a combo as well. Have had a bit of a hard time finding a consistent good source of lump charcoal though.

  12. Post
    #12

  13. Post
    #13
    linkdown wrote:
    The pork looks mean, that pizza could do with another minute or so imo, love the slightly burnt bits!

    What temperature did you cook the pork to?
    Yeah it was delicious! ... it wasn't tough at all BUT is wasn't as tender as I imagined it would have been. I'm not sure if this is because it got a bit hot in there for a while or because I didn't cook it long enough (I did get it to 90 C internal temp) ... or a mixture of both. The snake of charcoals was brilliant! Easy to pluck out the ones that weren't used and put them back in the bag!!!

    NiNjA-Keeley wrote:
    How come you used easy lighting coals?? Real charcoal or nothing br4 !!!
    Like the others have said: I use 'real' charcoal for pizzas, steak, chicken nibbles, sausages etc. but When I'm roasting or smoking I use the briquettes. Tey're not the "easy light" ones, I still put them in a chimney and fire them up for 15 mins. They don't seem to burn as hot as 'real' charcoal (good for low heat) but they still taste good.

  14. Post
    #14
    Grolim wrote:
    I think if you dropped the top layer it wouldn't run as hot.
    Yeah I'll try this next time...

  15. Post
    #15
    One thing I've been doing is covering the pork in american style mustard before the dry rub, you get a really epic bark all over it.

  16. Post
    #16
    Awesome thread... made me hungry

    our shitty gas bbq is due for replacement, I'm seriously considering getting a kettle

  17. Post
    #17
    linkdown wrote:
    One thing I've been doing is covering the pork in american style mustard before the dry rub, you get a really epic bark all over it.
    Think I'll try this too!!! Cheers

  18. Post
    #18
    I just picked one of these up for $13





    https://www.1-day.co.nz/products/QO2HBN114

  19. Post
    #19
    ^ I got one too

    Figured for that price even if the are crap a few of the parts might com in handy for something.

  20. Post
    #20
    Yeah my thoughts exactly :P

  21. Post
    #21
    Galent wrote:
    Yeah my thoughts exactly :P
    Grolim wrote:
    ^ I got one too
    It's a cook off ... GO!!!

  22. Post
    #22
    Lets keep this awesome thread going! Thought I'd document tonights classic roast chook


    Prep the chicken. I filled the cavity with a half lemon and some herbs (lemon thyme and sage). Also made a butter with lemon zest and pepper and separated the skin from the breast and push it inside along with a sage leaf. Coverd in oil, sea salt, pepper, and a little of my left over rub I use on my ribs.


    Set up the Weber kettle for indirect cooking. Coals lit in the chimney and on to one side with drip tray on the other:


    Get Big Blue up to temp:


    Chicken goes in along with a handful of cherry woodchips on the coals:


    Then time to prep the veg. Carrots, potato, shallots and garlic. Coated with oil, a splash of balsamic, sea salt, pepper, and chopped rosemary:


    On go the veg (about 15mins after the chicken):


    About an hour later she's done:


    Plated up:


    Delish! You'll never do a roast in the oven again!

  23. Post
    #23
    What kind of charcoal are you using? I used to use Foxpine briquettes which were decent, then got a couple of bags of basics which were shit - heaps of ash, crap to light and some had a funny smell. I'm running through a bag of Heat Beads (regular, not easy lite) which seem pretty good. Keen to get some lump charcoal though hardly anywhere sells it.

  24. Post
    #24
    I use Heat beads and love them. you can get Cadac lup charcoal (alien wood from Namibia) from Mitre 10 or bunnings ... I forget (maybe both!!!). I reccomend if you flavor but te lumps vary HUGELY in size!

    Grolim: God DAMN that looks good. you seem to have timed the viegies and the chicken really well! looks amazing

    Thats alot of coals in there! How hot was it? over 200C?

  25. Post
    #25
    Yeah I usually use Heat Beads. They are the best in terms of a good even long burn time, and can also be reused once extinguished. Many others seem to fall apart pretty easy. I also mixed in some coconut shell based briquettes I bought off Trademe that seem ok. They burn pretty hot.

    I like lump too, but yeah hard to find a decent supply. Great for searing a steak over!