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  1. Post
    KevinL wrote:
    Kenji does 3 hours post sous-vide for a < 3kg piece, so you should be right

    https://www.seriouseats.com/2016/08/...q-brisket.html
    Paging KevinL, and other Sous Vide/BBQ experts.

    I tried the above recipe, to the letter, with average-to-poor results. Meat tasted good, a bit overly salty, soft/tender, but verrrry dry. Wondered if any of you have tried with better success?

    Sous Vide for 24 hours at 155F. Smoked at 130C for 3ish hours.

    A couple of obvious (potential) problems. I had a flat cut piece of brisket (although the recipe says this should be fine). Very little fat cap on the brisket, didn't think this would be a major problem with the Sous Vide, but maybe it was?

    Thoughts?

  2. Post
    Although I don't know how this machine works, it looks great. I also want to try sous vide cooking now. Should I buy a food vacuum sealer. I found another advantage is that I can store some of my food for a long time.
    Last edited by KevinL; 15th January 2019 at 2:55 pm. Reason: Probably spam

  3. Post
    Buy marinated ribs in sealed bags then cook them for 24hrs @ 75C. Then drain the out of the bag. Put the ribs in a 250C oven for on the BBQ. Put the juice in frypan and reduce it to a paste using high heat. Then coat the ribs while cooking and at cooking is finished.

  4. Post
    I don't bother with a food sealer, I use glad bags with a seal. I double bag everything that has bones or sharp bits in it. If you place the food in the water with the bag mostly sealed, the water pushes all the air out the top and does a similar thing. Just make sure the seal is closed properly. Water logged food isn't nice.

  5. Post
    So I cooked a standing rib roast over the holidays. It turned out pretty good, equally cooked, fat rendered, and it was tender as I expected. What was a bit disappointed with, was it was bordering on dry. There was a lot of moisture in the bottom of the bag.

    Also I have noticed that if I flavour the meat with a dry rub, it doesn't seem to smell too good if it's been cooking for a few hours. Smells like damp socks a little. Tastes fine.

  6. Post
    Double bagging has still ****ed me on occasion (lamb bones are dicks)

    Too dry - maybe too high a temperature, or too long a cook? What were your settings?

    I generally don't season pre-cook for exactly that reason, season afterwards.

  7. Post
    @kevinl : I must admit I can't quite recall, but I followed the guidelines for a similar peice of meat that sousvideeverything did. It had 3 ribs and I had 2, so I shortened the cook time by approx 1/3 but kept the temperature the same. The meat was perfectly cooked through (still pink etc), but just a fair bit of the moisture was sitting in the bottom of the bag. Maybe shorten the time even more next time do you think? IIRC the temp I used was 58c. I think I cooked for 4 hours perhaps.

    The smell of the unseared meat isn't overly pleasant pre seasoned, but the seared end product seemed pretty awesome.

  8. Post
    sherryvan wrote:
    Although I don't know how this machine works, it looks great. I also want to try sous vide cooking now. Should I buy a food vacuum sealer. I found another advantage is that I can store some of my food for a long time.
    A vacuum sealer is not strictly necessary as you can use ziploc bags and seal them with the water displacement method, but that is a bit finnicky so I bought a vacuum sealer anyway. It's great.

  9. Post
    networkn wrote:
    @kevinl : I must admit I can't quite recall, but I followed the guidelines for a similar peice of meat that sousvideeverything did. It had 3 ribs and I had 2, so I shortened the cook time by approx 1/3 but kept the temperature the same. The meat was perfectly cooked through (still pink etc), but just a fair bit of the moisture was sitting in the bottom of the bag. Maybe shorten the time even more next time do you think? IIRC the temp I used was 58c. I think I cooked for 4 hours perhaps.
    58 @ 4 hours sounds about right unless your roast was very thin, who knows (the equivalent recipe on chefsteps recommends 4-6 hours for a 3 rib roast). Sometimes very lean cuts can end up a bit on the dry side

    Nothing that a bit of gravy won't fix (I hope you're using the bag juices)

  10. Post
    KevinL wrote:
    58 @ 4 hours sounds about right unless your roast was very thin, who knows (the equivalent recipe on chefsteps recommends 4-6 hours for a 3 rib roast). Sometimes very lean cuts can end up a bit on the dry side

    Nothing that a bit of gravy won't fix (I hope you're using the bag juices)
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    No I didn't use the bag juices, unfortunately, I ended up very short on time and the juices didn't smell so good.

  11. Post
    Bag juices sums it up

  12. Post
    JC wrote:
    Bag juices sums it up
    In what way? I am looking to have less at the bottom of the bag and more in the meat.

  13. Post
    If that's the whole thing I reckon it was too thin and should have been treated like a thick steak rather than a roast.

  14. Post
    KevinL wrote:
    If that's the whole thing I reckon it was too thin and should have been treated like a thick steak rather than a roast.
    So same temp but much less time? Say 1,5-3 hours rather than 3-4?

  15. Post
    I have a 3.5 KG Wagyu Briskett I got recently, frozen in the freezer. Was thinking about doing it next weekend. I was thinking about 135F for 36 hours. I am thinking around 12 hours for defrosting. Sound ok?

  16. Post
    networkn wrote:
    In what way? I am looking to have less at the bottom of the bag and more in the meat.
    I was just being crass brah, implying it looked so good I ... don't feel like spelling it out