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  1. Post
    #1

    Sous Vide

    Santa came early this year!

    I'll be using the vac sealer to make some bacon in the new year as well

    I have some guests coming in a weeks time so I thought I'd serve them some beef short ribs. So of course I have to make a test rib

    This rib will be cooked at 62C for 48 hours. Dropped it in just now ...all I got to do now is wait








  2. Post
    #2
    Nice! Looking forward to more pictures.

    I'm still waiting on my poor-man's version (http://www.nomiku.com/) to arrive sometime early next year. Keen to see how you get on so I can start making plans!

  3. Post
    #3
    I liked the ghetto approach in the other thread, but this has me intrigued

  4. Post
    #4
    awesome! hanging out for more pictures too, seen this on tv cooking shows a bit recently. How hard do you think it would be to keep a pot of water at consistent temp if you had a temp probe.. i guess there's a good reason there's a device to do it

  5. Post
    #5
    I think it's quite do-able (as demonstrated by a guy whose name has escaped me on these very forums), but it's not quite 'spray and walk away' like this device allows.

  6. Post
    #6
    clip wrote:
    awesome! hanging out for more pictures too, seen this on tv cooking shows a bit recently. How hard do you think it would be to keep a pot of water at consistent temp if you had a temp probe.. i guess there's a good reason there's a device to do it
    Relatively easy with gas i'd think, virtually impossible with electric. Having said that I'm not sure i'd be super keen to have a gas hob burning unattended for 12+ hours.

  7. Post
    #7
    Yeah I've had a good crack at the ghetto Sous Vide a couple of times... I filled this beer cooler with hot water (about 60) and put a steak in inside a ziplock bag. I left if for and hour checking the water temp every 10 minutes. This actually worked out quite well as it would only drop 2-3C or so every 10 minutes and the addition of a dash of boiling water would bring it back up to temp. That kind of fluctuation is fine for most applications.

    I got this unit mainly for doing longer cooks. So 24, 48 and 72 hour cooks where the connective tissue really gets a chance to break down completely. I also want to combine it with my Weber BBQ... i.e. Smoke for 2 - 4 hours at a low ish temp in the Weber then vac bag, and drop in the water for 48h.

    I have quite a few ideas already which I will attempt in the new year and I'll be sure to post my results here. I'm sure I'll have my fair share of failures so you all can laugh and learn from my mistakes

    BTW These machines are really coming down in price. The previous Polyscience machine was $1,300 ... I got this for ~$590. Soon they'll be like $200 - $400

  8. Post
    #8
    YES OH DAMN YES!!!

  9. Post
    #9
    Fapping and F5'ing

  10. Post
    #10
    Large investment right there, so jealous.
    Short ribs ideal for this style, are you going to smoke them as well?

  11. Post
    #11
    Des Flurane wrote:
    Large investment right there, so jealous.
    Short ribs ideal for this style, are you going to smoke them as well?
    This is quite a large investment for me! But cooking is a hobby and I don't spend too much on other things so I'm definitely pleased with it.

    For this batch (the batch I'll be serving next week) I won't be smoking it. This is definitely on the cards for following cooks but I thought I'd start simple and go from there (hopefully less chance to stuff up next week!).

    in the Modernist Cuisine cookbooks there are quite a few cured meat recipes that use sous vide so I'm quite keen to give them a go. However alot of the recipes will say "first smoke the meat at 70C for 7 hours. Thats quite a hurdle for me... First getting the Weber to smoke at that low of a temperature, secondly maintaining that temp for 7 hours!!!! It'll be a DIY job for sure.

    Of course I'll do all the classic sous vide egg recipes ... I.e. the 62C egg etc. should be a bit of fun.

  12. Post
    #12
    pics! :P

  13. Post
    #13
    70C Should be pretty attainable in the weber with a thin snake, say 2 briqs wide? Do you have a book/page reference for the recipes? Keen to have a nosy at them.

  14. Post
    #14
    Merkinz wrote:
    in the Modernist Cuisine cookbooks there are quite a few cured meat recipes that use sous vide so I'm quite keen to give them a go. However alot of the recipes will say "first smoke the meat at 70C for 7 hours. Thats quite a hurdle for me... First getting the Weber to smoke at that low of a temperature, secondly maintaining that temp for 7 hours!!!! It'll be a DIY job for sure.

    Sounds like you need a WSM or BGE Merkinz

    Looking forward to seeing what you come up with, make sure to include us along your journey. Would love to get into this myself but just haven't the time really.

  15. Post
    #15
    Deadm3at wrote:
    70C Should be pretty attainable in the weber with a thin snake, say 2 briqs wide? Do you have a book/page reference for the recipes? Keen to have a nosy at them.
    Sure thing. These are just the ones that are interesting to me at the moment. There are plenty of other recipes throughout the book here and there...

    Reference Tables:
    Tables for Brines, Cures and Dry Rubs 3.168-169
    Best Bets For Brining & Curing 3.172
    Hot- And Cold- Smoked Meats and Seafood 3.210
    Coarse Ground Sausages 3.236-237
    Emulsion-Style Sausages 3.238
    Fermented Sausages 3.244

    Specific Recipes:
    House-Cured Bacon 3.182
    Backstrap Molasses Country Ham 3.183
    Beef Cheek Pastrami 3.213 (This one is quite famous now for being delicious!)
    Fast Cured Pepperoni 3.247
    Pulled Pork Shoulder 5.78
    Pork Ribs 5.78 (Also becoming quite renowned)
    Beef Short Ribs 5.79
    Beef Brisket 5.79

    Yeah a WSM / BGE would be awesome right now! But ... No monies

  16. Post
    #16
    Take 1.

    62C for 48h - Seared by deep frying at 200C for 50 seconds

    Straight out of the bag:


    Off the bone and trimmed:


    Seared (deep fried):


    The end result:



    Well to be honest the end result was a little 'chewy' or 'tough'. It wasn't the connective tissue that was tough, that had almost melted away completely, the actual meat fibers seemed a little tough. Maybe longer next time??? I can't say I've ever had beef ribs before so I have no way on knowing if it was more or less tender than your typical beef rib.

    In any case it was incredibly 'beefy' tasting and the deep fry sear was simply incredible! It gives it quite a crunchy crust that is not oily at all!

  17. Post
    #17
    Damn, that's a shame because that looks EPIC

  18. Post
    #18
    Yeah, since done some reading & questioning and it turns out that over 60C the collagen that surrounds the meat fibers can contract (before they convert to gelatin) and squeeze some of the juices out making it a little dry. This totally makes sense for how it was. It broke apart amazingly easy (just look at how that bone came out) but the actual meat was a little tough... Still delicious!!!

    See... let me make the mistakes for you! haha

  19. Post
    #19
    Take two!


  20. Post
    #20
    where do you buy from, or did i miss the link?

  21. Post
    #21
    Merkinz wrote:
    Sure thing. These are just the ones that are interesting to me at the moment. There are plenty of other recipes throughout the book here and there...
    Interesting that they cure the sides of bacon with the bones in, im kind of torn on that one. I guess if i was doing larger quantities of bacon it'd be worthwhile as you'd get a higher yield of bacon-d meat; at my current level of production though by de-boning first we get a regular supply of ribs to eat so it's a bit of a catch-22.

    I was also a little surprised at the 12h rest between smoking and using, usually i rest mine for a fair bit longer. Maybe this is a function of it being hot smoked?

  22. Post
    #22
    http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2...ey-butter.html

    this sorta stuff is why i want a sous vide looks so damn good

  23. Post
    #23
    edit: made a thread instead...

  24. Post
    #24
    Android Grim wrote:
    where do you buy from, or did i miss the link?
    I got it from "Sous Chef" in NZ. They don't seem to sell it any more... O_o

  25. Post
    #25
    OK, back into it. Today I bought a more appropriate size chilli bin and cut it up for the Sous Vide. Works much better and I waste less water.







    Look at home in this thing