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  1. Post
    #51
    Is there a DIY project in particular you guys would recommend to a complete newbie? Saw this on reddit which I'm pretty tempted to give a go

    http://imgur.com/a/v3mBe

  2. Post
    #52
    My advise would be to only start a project that either only uses tools you have, or tools that you can afford and are comfortable to buy.
    There is nothign more frustrating than doing a shitty job on a project because your tools are lacking and you've had to fudge everything.

    But I would perhaps start off with making some sort of outdoor furniture. Google some simple plans that involve square cuts more or less everywhere - go to bunnings and buy some wood, galvanised fixings (Bolts, braces etc), and a hammer and a hand saw. That'll do ya right for a while.

    And don't cheap out on tools.

  3. Post
    #53
    P1n3apqlExpr3ss wrote:
    Is there a DIY project in particular you guys would recommend to a complete newbie? Saw this on reddit which I'm pretty tempted to give a go

    http://imgur.com/a/v3mBe
    Seems pretty easy. For a decent job you'd want a circular saw or drop saw with a decent blade to get square cuts. I'd just bear in mind that, that thing probably weights a ton so you'd be better to permanently fix it to the wall with screws to the studs (no anchors).

  4. Post
    #54
    Ended up making something like this with some MDF we had lying around, just gotta stain it over the weekend



    By 'don't cheap out on tools', can you clarify a bit? I saw a $80 Ryobi circular saw in some junk mail the other day, or there was an Ozito one for $65. What figure is generally too cheap?

  5. Post
    #55
    It really does depend how much DIY work you envisage yourself doing.
    But tools are one thing where the 'you get what you pay for' applies quite a lot. Sure they may look the same, but the cheaper circular saw will use cheaper metal in the blades, a cheaper less efficient motor, more plastic bits etc. They also tend to be harder to service, so people tend to throw them away rather than fix them.

    I've learnt my lesson in the past with cheap tools. Best example was the cheap hammer I bought the wife when we were doing some decking. A few hours in and the head came off mid-swing, almost taking her out. The "metal" shaft had snapped. I've also had a ratchet break its gearing half way through a car job, which left me a bit stuffed as I needed the car to go get another one.

    But look, if you don't see how your self being very much of a handy man, then go cheap. Save your money for beers and paying a bloke to do it. If however you really feel like getting stuck in and working towards a fine man cave, then go 'prosumer' range - not top of the line (I wouldn't pay $120 for a hammer), but mid range (I'd happily pay $60 for a hammer). It may hurt initially, but you'll thank yourself for it 10 years down the track.

  6. Post
    #56
    Currently renovating lounge/ kitchen/ dining room with a mix of trade help in areas that I want done to a very high standard and my own boss as skills. Pics once its done

  7. Post
    #57
    [Project H3]

    Please stop trying to steal my hot water cylinder.

    Attached Images


  8. Post
    #58
    Wait, what?

  9. Post
    #59
    lol, is that what $2,000,000 in mortgages buys you?

  10. Post
    #60
    Seriously, can we not shit storm another thread with MT attacks? So over it.

  11. Post
    #61
    SteveE wrote:
    lol, is that what $2,000,000 in mortgages buys you?
    Slumlord remember...

  12. Post
    #62
    Major reno on our bathroom done over labour weekend, due to leaks under the shower and toilet.

    Have to wait a few more weeks before plumber can come.

    Will post completed pics in many months once gib stopping is all done

    In coming wall of pics:

    Pre demo:



    All the fittings out and tiles up - Note the beautiful new opening into the separate toilet now were a mirror was cut out of the wall:


    Replacing 35mm hardboard walls with 70 stud walls (90mm when gibbed) and replaced rotten floor boards with plywood floors
    Studs going up:


    Door framing:


    Gib going up - excuse the excessive screws ... tiles going back on top and gib screwer was giving me grief all day:


    Entrance way gibbing:


    Still got several weeks worth of weekends before this will be finished.
    Next step is levelling the floor, installing the shower enclosure and slapping down some tile underlay.

    Will update when I cbf.

  13. Post
    #63
    Looks like a roomy bathroom.
    So why put the loo in it? Eeewwww.....

    And shower cubicles.....I loathe standing in them all squashed and cramped, I like to MOVE....
    You could have made one of those tiled open area shower things....you had enough room.

    And I bet your wife will hate cleaning the soap scum that will accumulate on the shower doors.

  14. Post
    #64
    ^ Wet floor bathrooms are gross! After being through South East Asia I could not handle that again.

  15. Post
    #65
    pctek wrote:
    Looks like a roomy bathroom.
    So why put the loo in it? Eeewwww.....

    And shower cubicles.....I loathe standing in them all squashed and cramped, I like to MOVE....
    You could have made one of those tiled open area shower things....you had enough room.

    And I bet your wife will hate cleaning the soap scum that will accumulate on the shower doors.
    Are you talking about the first pictures? Isn't that the old bathroom...

  16. Post
    #66
    Torquenstein wrote:
    Are you talking about the first pictures? Isn't that the old bathroom...
    Yep old bathroom in top pictures. Loo was already in it, but we are re-positioning to back wall.

    Also having a second toilet in the bathroom is great, especially for kids.

    Having a wet area bathroom increases the build cost by a factor of two easily, plus I think you need council consent to do those.

    We bought a 900 x 1200 shower to replace alcove shower so room to move wont be an issue.

    Tile shower areas are harder to clean than a shower enclosure so not sure what you're on about there pctek

  17. Post
    #67
    yeah i have a 'wet room' and i hate it. Putting in a glass shower enclosure is on my to do list

  18. Post
    #68
    bark has to be the easiest way to make a garden presentable (+weeding)

  19. Post
    #69
    until the birds come along and start picking at it and throwing it on the driveway/footpath/lawns.

    I removed all the bark from my gardens when I moved into my house.

    those ****ing birds.

  20. Post
    #70
    We've got Pukekoes - don't talk to me about birds :mad:

  21. Post
    #71
    I put 75mm X ~10mm treated edging around my bark areas. Now the birds only flick the bark where i've been too lazy to do it. Seems to reduce the mess by a huge amount though.

  22. Post
    #72
    SteveE wrote:
    We've got Pukekoes - don't talk to me about birds :mad:
    My mums got them at her place too, her cows chase them. Makes me lol. Shot a few of the bastards as well.

  23. Post
    #73
    DarkCypher wrote:
    until the birds come along and start picking at it and throwing it on the driveway/footpath/lawns.

    I removed all the bark from my gardens when I moved into my house.

    those ****ing birds.
    This is a very good point lol. As you can see in the photos the path is kinda below the level of the bark; plan is to dig it up, and pave a new one slightly above the level of the bark so it's a bit easier to keep tidy - just sweep it back onto the garden.

  24. Post
    #74
    Which drop saw: Black & Decker or Maktec (Makita's budget line)? Thats the sort of price point I'm looking at.

  25. Post
    #75
    I had a drink with one of the managers at mitre 10 and he told me if I ever wanted to buy power tools from them to get the cheapest one and use it to death within a few month, then take it back for a tradein when it appears to be dying...

    Great advocate for the company... Only one that has given up on me has been the cheapest multi tool.