Results 551 to 575 of 582

  1. Post
    Anyone had tinting applied to their windows? Our living area is a bit of a fish bowl with 2.1m high windows overlooking the street, looking to get a bit of privacy without impacting view, originally considered blinds that you could somewhat see out of but now looking at tinting instead. Anything I should be aware of?

  2. Post
    MoNk wrote:
    Thanks guys. You are both agreeing with my wife, and I'm slowly being convinced.

    Yeah we did have bifolds originally, but I hate them.
    Im going to say top to bottom, the lounge is already open enough without the extra opening and the kitchen stove top area against the wall could use more airflow in my opinion.

  3. Post
    Is there a recessed option that'll go into the cavity at the top? If so, that would be my #1 pick

    If not I'm still in the bottom to top camp.

  4. Post
    KevinL wrote:
    Is there a recessed option that'll go into the cavity at the top? If so, that would be my #1 pick
    There is, and it would be really nice, but it adds too much to the cost.

    My initial thought was top to bottom because it allowed a nicer flow from kitchen to deck.
    But now I'm thinking that doesn't really matter, and having the kitchen pantry opening into a doorway wouldn't be a good idea.

    Re airflow, we have new windows going in on the opposite side of the door.

  5. Post
    MoNk wrote:
    Thanks guys. You are both agreeing with my wife, and I'm slowly being convinced.

    Yeah we did have bifolds originally, but I hate them.
    What don't you like about them? I pushed for them as it meant the whole opening would be open, with the bifolds folding back against the house. Mrs wasn't keen at all, took a LOT of convincing. Now she says, "glad I picked bifolds..."

    I'd say bottom to top as well. Having the door sit at the pantry is fine and gives a more usable gap at the bottom end.

    one_red_god wrote:
    Turned up to my new building this morning, and they have installed the wrong dishwasher, not done the concrete as agreed, and not finished the claddings properly.

    But hey, my fibre is in and connected
    At least the important stuff is sorted eh. What have they done wrong with the concrete? That is part of the job you can't easily rectify without starting again.

  6. Post
    Fragluton wrote:
    What don't you like about them? I pushed for them as it meant the whole opening would be open, with the bifolds folding back against the house. Mrs wasn't keen at all, took a LOT of convincing. Now she says, "glad I picked bifolds..."
    Although I love that they open completely and fold behind, I don't like the mechanism of opening and closing them. If you want an easy opening then you have to pay extra and get a door inserted into one pane.
    Stackers are just so pain free and clean looking. Plus it can get a lot of wind and stackers are completely silent.

  7. Post
    Bottom to top for sure. The folding doors are the worst.

  8. Post
    DW wrote:
    Anyone had tinting applied to their windows? Our living area is a bit of a fish bowl with 2.1m high windows overlooking the street, looking to get a bit of privacy without impacting view, originally considered blinds that you could somewhat see out of but now looking at tinting instead. Anything I should be aware of?
    I have both. With tinting, just make sure you use someone who uses a high quality solar film.

    Also, something to consider if you have a big overhang on your roof or trees nearby that will partly cast shade, it can cause issues on big windows that get a lot of sun. My biggest window in my lounge spontaneously cracked, most likely due to this the glaziers reckoned, because of the film being on the inside reflecting through the glass - they said the glass was really hot when they went to remove it.

    I have sun shade blinds with a 10% openness in the bedrooms, from the street they match with the heavy tint level I have on the windows with solar film and can't be seen through - sure you can't see out of them as well as the solar film coated windows, but it is good enough considering the type of room they're in I think.

  9. Post
    Exterior painting question. Iíve had new fibre cement planks fixed around the base of my house nearest the ground, mainly to keep surface water from getting under the house.. I need to paint over this (currently bare) but at the same time, painting the older fibre cement board still visible to give it a new colour. Whatís the best type of paint system for this? Dude that installed recommended priming first then exterior timber paint oil based? Is that correct? Dude at mitre 10 reckons it was an odd recommendation. Now confused.

  10. Post
    Sounds ok, prime then exterior oil based paint. However water based primer and paint is almost as good and way nicer to work with and clean up. Should probably let someone more experienced reply first though.

  11. Post
    BradC is the man to ask.
    I find Resene are pretty good to deal with from experience. But this is a link on their page:
    https://www.resene.co.nz/homeown/pai...gconcrete6.htm

  12. Post
    Thanks guys. Yeah thatís the thing, everyone seems to recommend water based so I may just go with that. So not sure why the dude recommended oil based - perhaps better waterproofing qualities? But didnt think the paint serves as part of the waterproofing system for Fibre cement anyways. Or maybe the dude is just old school.

  13. Post
    I think oil paint will be more durable and last longer, you need to buy turps and wear gloves and it's difficult to clean the brushes and if you make a mess it will stay a mess. That's what I've been told and remember from painting as a kid.

  14. Post
    Gave the house a birthday present. It had 2 roofs on it. The original 1950s iron then a re-roof in 1970s/80s with decromastic tiles so Ive gone with Colorsteel. Box gutters look so much cleaner too. Click image for larger version. 

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  15. Post
    My 1965 house has the same, iron with decromastic tiles on top. Don't the tiles contain asbestos?

  16. Post
    kiwijunglist wrote:
    My 1965 house has the same, iron with decromastic tiles on top. Don't the tiles contain asbestos?
    Yes. Not sure what precautions they took, but judging by the photo, no comment.

  17. Post
    hypotenuse wrote:
    Exterior painting question. I’ve had new fibre cement planks fixed around the base of my house nearest the ground, mainly to keep surface water from getting under the house.. I need to paint over this (currently bare) but at the same time, painting the older fibre cement board still visible to give it a new colour. What’s the best type of paint system for this? Dude that installed recommended priming first then exterior timber paint oil based? Is that correct? Dude at mitre 10 reckons it was an odd recommendation. Now confused.
    Sounds strange to me too.. I always go for water-based if possible (when I was a painter), just make sure you do the prep by-the-book and use the correct sealer if it's bare, zinc over nails etc. I would suggest having a chat to the people at a paint shop. I've never heard of water-based acrylics etc being any less durable than oil-based paints, and not breathing in the vapors and ease of cleanup is a huge plus imo.

  18. Post
    swazi wrote:
    Gave the house a birthday present. It had 2 roofs on it. The original 1950s iron then a re-roof in 1970s/80s with decromastic tiles so Ive gone with Colorsteel. Box gutters look so much cleaner too.
    Roughly how big a roof and how much did it cost, im in for a new roof soon.

  19. Post
    80m2 according to Auckland Council (sorry havent measured myself).
    I got a deal through the company I work for so that amount is irrelevant. I got 2 other quotes and they were both for $25k. It depends on whether any building work is required, insulation, what type of gutters and whether new down pipes are required and even how much scaffolding is required and of course complexity of roof and whether you go for tile or longrun iron etc.

  20. Post
    hypotenuse wrote:
    Exterior painting question. I’ve had new fibre cement planks fixed around the base of my house nearest the ground, mainly to keep surface water from getting under the house.. I need to paint over this (currently bare) but at the same time, painting the older fibre cement board still visible to give it a new colour. What’s the best type of paint system for this? Dude that installed recommended priming first then exterior timber paint oil based? Is that correct? Dude at mitre 10 reckons it was an odd recommendation. Now confused.
    I can't wrap my head around this. How are the planks stopping surface water?

    On the surface I'd say something like a coat of Resene Quick Dry and two coats of Resene Lumbersider. All acrylic, there's no real benefit of oil in most cases because it chalks, it's slower to apply (often you can only put one coat of oil on in a day), and it's more toxic. There alternate products from Dulux or whoever, but those are easy to apply and stick like shit to a blanket.

    You'd only want to think about something else if the boards are going to be submerged in water for prolonged periods. Put some photos of the area and boards and I'll get a better idea.

  21. Post
    swazi wrote:
    80m2 according to Auckland Council (sorry havent measured myself).
    I got a deal through the company I work for so that amount is irrelevant. I got 2 other quotes and they were both for $25k. It depends on whether any building work is required, insulation, what type of gutters and whether new down pipes are required and even how much scaffolding is required and of course complexity of roof and whether you go for tile or longrun iron etc.
    That seems a lot but I don't know how involved the demo and prep were.

    Then again you'd probably pay 3 grand just to remove the lead heads and refix with roofing screws. And 3 grand for scaffolding.

  22. Post
    The scaff component was indeed $3k.

  23. Post
    bradc wrote:
    I can't wrap my head around this. How are the planks stopping surface water?

    On the surface I'd say something like a coat of Resene Quick Dry and two coats of Resene Lumbersider. All acrylic, there's no real benefit of oil in most cases because it chalks, it's slower to apply (often you can only put one coat of oil on in a day), and it's more toxic. There alternate products from Dulux or whoever, but those are easy to apply and stick like shit to a blanket.

    You'd only want to think about something else if the boards are going to be submerged in water for prolonged periods. Put some photos of the area and boards and I'll get a better idea.
    Dunno. Building report said maintenance on the fibre cement around base of house was needed to prevent some water getting into the crawl space. I donít know the technical term for this water. Got a couple of different builders around to suggest fix and both suggested fixing planks to the base. Itís not not only thing I got done - installed some drains too.

    Re paint I just ended up getting some water based self priming exterior paint and dude at mitre 10 said dude 2 or 3 coats and itíll be fine. Iíll roll with that.

  24. Post
    Just finished the first coat. Thank god I didnít go for the oil based option - would have had to have been so much more careful and cleanup would have been shit. I forgot how much of a bloody mess you create when painting. Thanks for the suggestions.

  25. Post
    If its the fibre cement cladding, doesnt it usually they just need to be painted every x amount of years to ensure that they remain water tight? But thats not protecting against surface water / immersion...just rain lol