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  1. Post
    A good paint should be ok for 10 years.

  2. Post
    Equity wrote:
    If its the fibre cement cladding, doesnt it usually they just need to be painted every x amount of years to ensure that they remain water tight? But thats not protecting against surface water / immersion...just rain lol
    Isnt it the plaster cladding where painting for water-tightness every x years is crucial? Didnít think it was as crucial for fibre cement weatherboard planks?

  3. Post
    Depends what the edges of the planks are doing in terms of water tightness.

  4. Post
    Fibre cement does not like water on cut edges.

  5. Post
    Just a quick question regarding renos, I have a 50's state house in an un-cared for state. I have plans/ideas for renos, however I have no money/ a super tight budget. Now the incredibly tired toilet has started to leak from a crack in the underside of the cistern. My question is, do I replace the toilet and look at re-doing the bathroom at the same time as this will save me money in the long-run, or can I just get a new toilet and get it installed and then continue the reno further down the line as planned, with no added cost. I have no plans to change the layout of said bathroom, just to slightly update it, and rejuvenate as required.

    This actually didn't turn out to be a quick question.

    Any help would be appreciated!

  6. Post
    You could possibly temporarily repair the toilet depending on how bad it is and whether you can access it easily. See YT for tutorials.
    A photo of the bathroom may give people an opportunity to better help. There are so many variables to your question especially as were working on limited information and assumptions.

  7. Post
    You could do a temp repair...however personally Id just replace the toilet now with the one you want when you do the renos. Then renovate the rest of the bathroom / toilet later. The only thing that would make it hard is if the toilet is not a standard configuration...eg. is it raised on concrete, or is the bend non standard - however a plumber would more than likely be able to make it work.

    Taking it out when you change the flooring is simple as, or you can just lay tiles around it. If you are changing the location of the toilet then you will have to do the same amount of work - mays well do that all when you do the full reno.

    Get onto it quick...if its soaked into the floorboards then you could end up with a much bigger job than a toilet replacement.

  8. Post
    If I go to gas hot water how much work needs to be done in terms of piping? Is all the existing piping adequate or do they need to upgrade it? House was built in '61.

    My hot water pressure has always been bad, but it's got really bad recently. I think my hot water cylinder is on the way out. Literally almost completely cold shower which isn't ideal in winter....

    3 or 4k for gas hot water install?

  9. Post
    I paid $2946 for a Rheem 27 supplied and installed. 3k seems pretty standard.
    I put mine into a 1952 house and didn't have to change anything inside. Very minimal pipework outside. I presume (IANAPlumber) that if your pipework handles your existing cold water pressure then nothing else needs to change.

    I ended up putting limiters on my shower and kitchen tap because my pressure is so high and I was chewing through gas bottles.

    1 tip if you are on bottles - Don't rely on the changeover valve to tell you the bottle is empty. I have 2 weeks minimum left in a bottle after it flicks to the other cylinder, so I just turn the full one off to stop this.

  10. Post
    Pipework will depend on location of water cylinder and location of new gas unit. If you're pipes are stuffed, and running low pressure, you can have problems. Sometimes fixtures aren't setup for mains pressure, which is what the new gas unit will be. Case by case basis and often depends on inlet pressure too. We don't generally have issues. But on a super old house it spilt a pipe within a wall, which created a bit of work for the plumber lol.

    I have limited plumbing knowledge (am only a gasfitter), but if your cold pressure is good, and hot pressure is bad. Switching to an instantaneous gas unit should result in the same hot and cold pressure. Night and day in some cases, which is when people say they should have changed over years ago. We do one changeover a week on average.

    MoNk wrote:
    1 tip if you are on bottles - Don't rely on the changeover valve to tell you the bottle is empty. I have 2 weeks minimum left in a bottle after it flicks to the other cylinder, so I just turn the full one off to stop this.
    Could be faulty regulator. If it's an autochange-over regulator, you are defeating it's purpose by doing that. When operating correctly, the regulator will indicate as soon as one cylinder is empty. Turning one off just means you'll often end up with a cold shower as the indicator one cylinder is empty. In my case, I easily get 2 months from when its indicated to when the second cylinder is empty. YMMV.

  11. Post
    WeenieBeenie wrote:
    If I go to gas hot water how much work needs to be done in terms of piping? Is all the existing piping adequate or do they need to upgrade it? House was built in '61.

    My hot water pressure has always been bad, but it's got really bad recently. I think my hot water cylinder is on the way out. Literally almost completely cold shower which isn't ideal in winter....

    3 or 4k for gas hot water install?
    It may just be the thermostat on the hot water cylinder.

    Not an expensive fix, I've had it happen to me in two places, allow a couple of hundred for a sparky. The part's about $80 or so, plus some time to get there and wire up the new one.

  12. Post
    Fragluton wrote:
    Could be faulty regulator. If it's an autochange-over regulator, you are defeating it's purpose by doing that. When operating correctly, the regulator will indicate as soon as one cylinder is empty. Turning one off just means you'll often end up with a cold shower as the indicator one cylinder is empty. In my case, I easily get 2 months from when its indicated to when the second cylinder is empty. YMMV.
    Whenever it swapped it 'appeared empty', but I could always get more out of it. My friend had the same thing with a different regulator. We get around 3 months per cylinder, so whoever gets cold it's their bad luck! We aren't too fussed about this.
    I figured it was just Chch and our varied temperatures causing it. Not sure if that is plausible.

  13. Post
    On a cold morning it's possible the cylinder won't be able to create enough gas to meet the load, and appear empty to the regulator. Not a flawless system I guess. A long shower could do this, on a cold morning, especially if the cylinder is already running a bit low. Sometimes when it is cold, the mix of gases in the cylinder won't all boil off either. If you're using a lot of gas on cold mornings it can happen. Not much can be done to prevent that. More often than not though when people have said to me they turn one off. A, the regulator isn't quite up to scratch or B, they were never told how the regulator operates.

    tl;dr: it's possible for a cylinder to stop providing gas in the right situation, which can trigger the regulator.

  14. Post
    Fragluton wrote:
    tl;dr: it's possible for a cylinder to stop providing gas in the right situation, which can trigger the regulator.
    We definitely use a huge amount of gas in the morning with very long showers at around ~7AM, and barely any at other times.

    Its a shame the regulators can't flick back again.

  15. Post
    Yeah only so much gas the cylinder can create at low temps. The reason it changes is that the cylinder runs out of gas. Have heard of people wrapping cylinders with a insulation wrap. Never seen it done though. Yeah flicking back would be a good feature to have. There may even be regulators available that do it.

  16. Post
    WeenieBeenie wrote:
    If I go to gas hot water how much work needs to be done in terms of piping? Is all the existing piping adequate or do they need to upgrade it? House was built in '61.

    My hot water pressure has always been bad, but it's got really bad recently. I think my hot water cylinder is on the way out. Literally almost completely cold shower which isn't ideal in winter....

    3 or 4k for gas hot water install?
    First thing I would do if I purchased a new house is remove all Galvanised pipework under house and all the way to the street, lowest cost for highest return on increased flow. All Hot pressure/flow is ultimately determined by the cold water feed coming from the street, low pressure cylinders can last upwards of 25 years. If it's only dropped off recently most likely the cold feed has dropped(possible blocked in line filter), the Pressure reducing valve is faulty or there may be a faulty pressure relief valve (most likely on the roof) The 2 valves are generally replaced together.

    You're pretty much asking someone to give you a haircut over the internet. Pics/videos always help. But I always refuse to quote a job without first seeing it.

  17. Post
    We swapped out a galv pipe when we had a leak a few years ago (before we installed gas). It was more than 50% blocked with rusty crap. Looked horrible.

  18. Post
    MoNk wrote:
    I paid $2946 for a Rheem 27 supplied and installed. 3k seems pretty standard.
    I put mine into a 1952 house and didn't have to change anything inside. Very minimal pipework outside. I presume (IANAPlumber) that if your pipework handles your existing cold water pressure then nothing else needs to change.

    I ended up putting limiters on my shower and kitchen tap because my pressure is so high and I was chewing through gas bottles.

    1 tip if you are on bottles - Don't rely on the changeover valve to tell you the bottle is empty. I have 2 weeks minimum left in a bottle after it flicks to the other cylinder, so I just turn the full one off to stop this.
    Hey Monk how are you finding it? Did it reduce your power bill on hot water much by switching to Gas?

  19. Post
    We installed Gas when out hotwater cylinder failed. Gas install cost $4000 + gst. A new hotwater cylinder would have cost more
    Our power bills have dropped by more than a third, and we go through 3-4 gas bottles a year. So over all we've saved money.

  20. Post
    Rebound wrote:
    Hey Monk how are you finding it? Did it reduce your power bill on hot water much by switching to Gas?
    The pressure is awesome. Our cold water pressure is pretty extreme so I fit limiters on my shower and tap. This reduces the pressure and saves us some money.

    It's hard to say $ wise. At the same time I added additional ceiling batts and put in a fireplace. We only use the heatpump maybe once a week, and then AC in summer.

  21. Post
    MoNk wrote:
    The pressure is awesome. Our cold water pressure is pretty extreme so I fit limiters on my shower and tap. This reduces the pressure and saves us some money.

    It's hard to say $ wise. At the same time I added additional ceiling batts and put in a fireplace. We only use the heatpump maybe once a week, and then AC in summer.
    Thanks for that, I have a relatively new HWC but I'm finding my power bills seem to be high with water use and our water pressure is pretty good. Was thinking the of switching to gas would pay for itself over time. Might look into this further before winter, thanks for your quick reply!

    - - - Updated - - -

    zippy wrote:
    We installed Gas when out hotwater cylinder failed. Gas install cost $4000 + gst. A new hotwater cylinder would have cost more
    Our power bills have dropped by more than a third, and we go through 3-4 gas bottles a year. So over all we've saved money.
    Great to know re cost Thanks Zippy

  22. Post
    Alright so this question is not exactly DIY related but more the selling of a property after a reno..

    Frst time selling a property. Is it normal to have a section like this in a listing agreement?


    "As the signatory or signatories we, the Sellers, agree to and accept the following:
    ....
    that any price or price 'clue' price used is at our instruction and is to be advertised as shown on this listing authority or otherwise as subsequently instructed in writing by us. We acknowledge that if a price is displayed in marketing we are prepared to accept unconditonal offers at that level and seriously consider conditional offers at that level (with the proviso that for the latter we can take into account the effect of any special conditons)."

    The reason this concerns me is that the agent has indicated the property could be worth 10-20% more but encourages us to have a low advertised price to get more attention.

    When I first asked them to come do an apprasial they also first wanted me to tell them what was the minimum price I expected which they have now put on the agreement under "Seller Expectation" and what they want to use for the advertised price. It just feels to me a bit like when someone is trying to buy something off you for the cheapest price possible rather than sell it for you for the best price they can get. In saying this they did give the appraisal at a price range of (my low expectation price) to (my low price + 15%).

    Anyway if thats normal I guess I have nothing to worry about, I am just out of the country at the moment so its not as easy as it would normally be to chat with them and bring up any concerns. Also, is listing agreement usually something you would get your lawyer to go over?
    Last edited by hype; 30th April 2019 at 3:44 am.

  23. Post
    hype wrote:
    Alright so this question is not exactly DIY related but more the selling of a property after a reno..

    Frst time selling a property. Is it normal to have a section like this in a listing agreement?


    "As the signatory or signatories we, the Sellers, agree to and accept the following:
    ....
    that any price or price 'clue' price used is at our instruction and is to be advertised as shown on this listing authority or otherwise as subsequently instructed in writing by us. We acknowledge that if a price is displayed in marketing we are prepared to accept unconditonal offers at that level and seriously consider conditional offers at that level (with the proviso that for the latter we can take into account the effect of any special conditons)."

    The reason this concerns me is that the agent has indicated the property could be worth 10-20% more but encourages us to have a low advertised price to get more attention.

    When I first asked them to come do an apprasial they also first wanted me to tell them what was the minimum price I expected which they have now put on the agreement under "Seller Expectation" and what they want to use for the advertised price. It just feels to me a bit like when someone is trying to buy something off you for the cheapest price possible rather than sell it for you for the best price they can get. In saying this they did give the appraisal at a price range of (my low expectation price) to (my low price + 15%).

    Anyway if thats normal I guess I have nothing to worry about, I am just out of the country at the moment so its not as easy as it would normally be to chat with them and bring up any concerns. Also, is listing agreement usually something you would get your lawyer to go over?
    It's only an issue if you wouldn't accept an unconditional offer at that price. Its pretty easy to 'Seriously Consider' a conditional offer and say no.

    You might get offered more if you wait, but if you would turn down an unconditional offer of your asking price, then it isn't really your asking price.