Epic BBQ Index or, What to do now that you have a new Weber BBQ.

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  1. Post
    zippy wrote:
    Yep, it's fine
    Seconded. Not great, but doesn't ruin the meat either.

  2. Post
    Cool. I got some hickory for my first smoke and further experimentation. Thought it might be a bit strong - may try feijoa or apple.

  3. Post
    Apple is my go-to, I don't really like hickory. Oak was pretty awesome too.

  4. Post
    Tea tree ftw.

  5. Post
    Apparently puriri is boss mode but I can't find enough of it

  6. Post
    I’ll find some next time I head up north. Easy pickin’.

  7. Post
    Been slowly reading the thread and getting up to play. Never been a big fan of barbecue as I couldn't really see the point or felt I was missing something. This is obviously due to the fact I have been spoon fed the standard kiwi stainless gas barbecue that resembles little in difference to my oven/hob.
    My memories of charcoal barbecue date back to my father on a Sunday afternoon burning food crispy black after almost setting himself alight with starter fluid.
    BUT, my eyes have been opened, I'm in awe at the marvelous creations I have seen and inspired to pursue the true art of charcoal barbecue.
    Where do I begin, does it have to be a weber? Would prefer a smaller outlay initially.

  8. Post
    Nut3r wrote:
    Been slowly reading the thread and getting up to play. Never been a big fan of barbecue as I couldn't really see the point or felt I was missing something. This is obviously due to the fact I have been spoon fed the standard kiwi stainless gas barbecue that resembles little in difference to my oven/hob.
    My memories of charcoal barbecue date back to my father on a Sunday afternoon burning food crispy black after almost setting himself alight with starter fluid.
    BUT, my eyes have been opened, I'm in awe at the marvelous creations I have seen and inspired to pursue the true art of charcoal barbecue.
    Where do I begin, does it have to be a weber? Would prefer a smaller outlay initially.
    You could start with a jumbo joe (~$200 - smokey joe is even cheaper but probably too small too be useful), or look at a parallel imported unit (e.g. container door, if you don't mind waiting). The advantage to the weber BBQs are better ash management and better sealing - the cheaper units tend to leak air, which make low and slow much more difficult (as airflow = temperature).

    A chimney is also essential but can be had for $20-30. You'll want to consider a thermometer too - decent wireless dual probe will probably run in the 50-100 range, but you can get started with just the BBQ and chimney IMO.

  9. Post
    Get a Weber, they're worth the money

  10. Post

  11. Post
    OK, will go with the Weber. Thanks for the responses.

  12. Post
    One thing that took me too long to figure out was to stick with the same brand of briquettes and write down what you used etc. They all act different from lighting speed to heat to duration etc. I started just writing notes in a google sheet and its helped a lot with figuring out what to do each time and how to get it going nice.

    I tend to use the samba ones here as bunnings is much closer than mitre10

    https://www.bunnings.co.nz/samba-4kg...fuel_p03170432

    they are a bit of a shit to get going so what I do now is to put a ~50mm layer of lump underneath them in the chimney when I light them. Now it goes sweet with one firelighter cube rather than endless flaffing. 4kg bag made into a snake will do me for a 6-7 hour cook easy peasy.

  13. Post
    Good advice

  14. Post
    Heat Beads from Mitre10 are a good option too. A little more expensive but can burn for a long time. I can get about 3x 10+ hour snakes out of a $35 10kg bag.

  15. Post
    Caffeine wrote:
    Heat Beads from Mitre10 are a good option too. A little more expensive but can burn for a long time. I can get about 3x 10+ hour snakes out of a $35 10kg bag.
    Heat beads are what I use. Good for low and slow. Kingsford burns hotter but doesn't last as long