Stream of HOSciousness Transfer Station (NSFW)

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  1. Post
    Roumelio wrote:
    Blood poisoning, endocarditis so on and so forth. I'm not making out anything, ask your dentist. I'm not making it out to be the number one cause of heart disease but its one of many and when it does happen that someone ends up with an infection in their head they can't afford to treat it just leads you one step closer to heart disease. Most dentists will recognise this.
    You're conflating a bunch of different situations and using terminology fast and loose as usual

  2. Post
    KevinL wrote:
    You're conflating a bunch of different situations and using terminology fast and loose as usual
    I mean sepsis is real, I spent three weeks in a hospital bed two years ago at risk of sepsis because of salmonella gastroenteritis. They're just a bunch of different examples not a conflation of anything. I am not a doctor, but I would say most doctors I've seen with various complaints tend to have a rather limited understanding of dentistry.

    If you're going to leave an infection to the point where it compromises your blood stream regardless of where it comes from in your gums or teeth or whatever, in my case my bowels became borderline septic and I perhaps would have died without antibiotics in a rather painful way... yeah the outcomes wont be good. You may even go into septic shock and die.

  3. Post
    As usual with your posts, there are elements of truth but you chop and change your terminology and use terms inaccurately (for example, endocarditis != heart attack); then when challenged you go for the personal attacks (doctors don't know about teeth)

    Dental infection related endocarditis occurs, but the costs (considering the incidence) would still be pretty far off justifying national dental subsidies

  4. Post
    mancubus wrote:
    They only did select areas though. The posh areas mostly, and missed the slums with a high crackhead concentration, like where I live.
    ftfy

  5. Post
    Firstly you may want to learn how a comma delineates one or more extra variables or possibilities....

    Secondly From a large range of personal experience I've never really found a doctor that knows much about teeth or more than a dentist anyhow.

    Thirdly, yes I've asked in emergency situations due to a variation of things... most recently in relation to anticholinergic dry mouth, eyes, bowels, teeth, so on and so forth in relation to medication that caused tooth decay as an aside.Funny how all these medications for everything from nausea to bowel spasms, to antidepressants have all these wonderful side effects and may in some cases cause severe dehydration.

    Fourthly, dental related sepsis also occurs from gum disease in animals and humans and that was one of my other variables.

    Finally INAD.... of course my response is possibly not as clear as yours.

  6. Post
    Why would a doctor know more about teeth than a dentist? You're talking sepsis and endocarditis, those are not the realm of the dentist.... all we care about is the route of infection and how to treat it.

    Also you can get endocarditis/sepsis from brushing your teeth. Stay safe.

  7. Post
    ClavulanateV2 wrote:
    Also you can get endocarditis/sepsis from brushing your teeth. Stay safe.
    Also dental treatment, dem bacterial showers

  8. Post
    I'm not expecting a doctor to know more, I'm expecting that if a GP is worth they're weight in anything that they should know about some of the less fun side effects and perhaps not so readily prescribe multiple drugs that cause anticholinergic side effects to a patient for one and how to treat the effects of such things in relation to drugs they may be prescribing which from my experience has been rather limited. Of course N≠1 but I've had a significant enough sample size (more than 10 doctors) either the 5 at my local practice or through random visits to the ER as a result of severe symptoms that doctors didn't know stuff all to do with it and when it comes to teeth it becomes even more limited... Other than to say hey go and visit your dentist and talk about X which results in a bottle of biotine and some tooth moose to go with it.

    Of course anything that may inflame your gums has a possibility to cause an infection... that's not rocket science. Whats more fun is when you get inflamed gums and root carries through no fault of your own but because you're on drugs that have that side effect profile.

  9. Post
    Gesellschaft wrote:
    While we're at it, was pretty shocked/salty to find out that pharmacists get to choose the prices of subsidized medicines.

    Great feeling when you leave hospital with a lung infection expecting to finally be rid of it after months of feeling horrible, only to find out the antibiotics are nearly $200 and you unfortunately need to pay rent and eat instead, then have the pharmacist be like "umm I can discount it to $80 I guess ¯\_(ツ)_/¯" when you decide to go without the medicine.
    Pharmacies in hospitals are always super expensive

  10. Post
    NaCh0 wrote:
    Pharmacies in hospitals are always super expensive
    This wasn't in the hospital and wasn't the only time it's happened, being allergic to most funded antibiotics is lit.

  11. Post
    DW wrote:
    If its fully subsidised they can't, if its partially subsidised they can have a % markup on the remaining cost, but the variation you've mentioned seems excessive. To get to the variance you mentioned I would suspect they'd have to have reduced the amount of medication they were going to supply possibly?
    I meant to type unsubsidized medicines whoops

  12. Post
    i.e.awesome wrote:
    There are clinics that are free if you have a csc.
    I'm unable to find these free clinics that you speak of. Care to point me in the right direction?

  13. Post
    Anroidzzzzz

  14. Post
    Gesellschaft wrote:
    This wasn't in the hospital and wasn't the only time it's happened, being allergic to most funded antibiotics is lit.
    Forget the antibio's, that's big pharma propoganda. You just need cabbage juice. Drink it while doing a handstand on a full moon in a north easterly breeze and it'll cure your black lung.

  15. Post
    i.e.awesome wrote:
    Honestly I'm more concerned at the costs of going to a dentist than a doctor. At least doctors are subsidised. I know quite a few people who haven't been to the dentist since they were 17 and it was free.
    Yep, me, I avoid the dentist at all costs (lol punny), not because I don't like them doing the work, I just don't have $1,000 to pay for what needs doing. Teeth should be at the top of my list of priorities but they're always at the bottom.

  16. Post
    Anroid wrote:
    I'm unable to find these free clinics that you speak of. Care to point me in the right direction?
    Here's one. See central.
    https://www.tuimedical.co.nz/fees/

  17. Post
    i.e.awesome wrote:
    Here's one. See central.
    https://www.tuimedical.co.nz/fees/
    But wrong city. I live in Auckland. The cheapest in Auckland central looks to be $17-18.5
    https://www.healthpoint.co.nz/download,450716.do

  18. Post
    Gesellschaft wrote:
    I just email mine every month, no appointment, no fees.

    Also go to Countdown for free prescriptions if you haven't hit the limit where they become free yet.
    Which practice gives you free repeating prescriptions!? or is that no fees as to no appointment fees, but you still pay a repeating prescription fee?

    This stupid practice is requiring me to pay $50 for the first consultation with nurse and Dr but then its $18.5 thereafter BUT it's a 5min walk, so don't need to drive. The repeating prescription fees are $10

    If it wasn't for this stupid initial $50 consultation then i'd be sold due to price and location.

  19. Post
    Auckland fire restrictions on burning a small amount of vegetation is more of a guideline than a rule amirite

  20. Post
    Roumelio wrote:
    but I've had a significant enough sample size (more than 10 doctors) either the 5 at my local practice or through random visits to the ER as a result of severe symptoms that doctors didn't know stuff all to do with it and when it comes to teeth it becomes even more limited...
    Doctors must love you. I hope you wear an "I'm a historian" t-shirt so they know not to question you when you visit.

  21. Post
    Tormenta wrote:
    Auckland fire restrictions on burning a small amount of vegetation is more of a guideline than a rule amirite
    Yeah mate.

  22. Post
    Hey Kevin, can I get a free consult please?

    On boxing day I was a dickhead and after successfully playing on the giant rope swing a few times, the last time I almost broke my tibia, at the top below the knee. It impacted the platform I was jumping from really hard when I swung back (put my leg down to stop myself swinging into family members). Now my ankle and entire foot is black/blue/purple with bruising. There are a few purple spots up my leg and around the impact point is an off-orange/yellow colour along with a deep scar that looks angry and has scabbed over, mmmm yum. I've had xrays and it's not broken (apparently, feels like it is though)

    Is that bruising in the foot normal after bruising the bone so far up the leg?

  23. Post
    You have rope aids, I can tell because I studied history.

  24. Post
    Mutton wrote:
    You have rope aids, I can tell because I studied history.
    Yeah but I only have the rope aids on my hands. I've kept them covered with a sheep's bladder (as is the ancient custom to prevent spreading the aids)

  25. Post
    Oh I forgot to mention, the skin/tissue around the impact point has been numb since boxing day.

    That's bad right?