Windows 10 Thread

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  1. Post
    You're not expecting it to be on for 18 hours, you're expecting it to be running continuous task for 18 hours. There is a big difference.

    I don't know anyone who has a computer at home running a continuous task for 18 hours short of people mining bitcoins or torrenting.

  2. Post
    Mine is on 24/7 running the continuous task of my security camera's software

  3. Post
    Mine are also on 24/7 but most of the time just sitting there installing updates and restarting automatically

  4. Post
    Privoxy wrote:
    You're not expecting it to be on for 18 hours, you're expecting it to be running continuous task for 18 hours. There is a big difference.

    I don't know anyone who has a computer at home running a continuous task for 18 hours short of people mining bitcoins or torrenting.
    I don't think there is a big difference - the computer will restart whether a task is running or not. Even if you're not running an 18 hour task you may have open files, webpages, even VMs that would all get lost in a restart.

    I had a time where I stepped away for 20 mins and came back to all my changes lost. Pretty frustrating that the best you can do is restrict it to a 6 hour restart window.

  5. Post

  6. Post
    ^^All too familiar. Considered linux yet?

  7. Post
    sorceror wrote:
    I don't think there is a big difference - the computer will restart whether a task is running or not. Even if you're not running an 18 hour task you may have open files, webpages, even VMs that would all get lost in a restart.

    I had a time where I stepped away for 20 mins and came back to all my changes lost. Pretty frustrating that the best you can do is restrict it to a 6 hour restart window.
    https://www.udse.de/en/windows-10-reboot-blocker

    Unfortunate choice of download button (looks very spammy) but this little program just constantly changes the Active Hours to be further ahead. Only works with the Anniversary Update.

    Privoxy wrote:
    You're not expecting it to be on for 18 hours, you're expecting it to be running continuous task for 18 hours. There is a big difference.

    I don't know anyone who has a computer at home running a continuous task for 18 hours short of people mining bitcoins or torrenting.
    Home, okay, but Pro now does it too.
    I know a lot of people (designers/graphics & animation people/audio visual people) who need their systems doing uninterrupted tasks for over a day at a time. Myself included.
    Last edited by Richard7666; 18th June 2017 at 12:26 pm.

  8. Post
    It's not even relevant what the workload is. I frequently step out for 12 hours and have a basic requirement for a computer to be capable of maintaining its state in my absence. In theory I could make backups and shut everything down each time, but since it's not the 1980s this isn't my preferred option.

  9. Post
    lumpy custard wrote:
    It's not even relevant what the workload is. I frequently step out for 12 hours and have a basic requirement for a computer to be capable of maintaining its state in my absence. In theory I could make backups and shut everything down each time, but since it's not the 1980s this isn't my preferred option.
    So, what's the alternative then? What should Microsoft do?

  10. Post
    Build an OS that doesn't need a restart with just about every patch? Others seem pretty good in that department, and a decade or so ago I think MS were touting the next OS (can't remember which one - probably 7) was going to be much better in that regard too. I guess they lost that priority, amongst other.

  11. Post
    Oh I agree completely, but that's why I run Linux at home and osx at work.

    You have to admit though MS are stuck between a rock and a hard place. Sure they could allow you to disable the auto restart but then they are going to have to try and support all sorts of random builds otherwise people will bitch and moan they're no longer getting updates, and the security drama alone would be huge.

    If you look at this from a business/enterprise move it makes total sense. Force all your customers onto the same release at the same time as to make it a **** load easier on your engineering team (hence cheaper, lets not forget MS, like every other company is about profit). I don't blame or fault them for this because I do the exact same thing in my day-to-day job.

  12. Post
    Privoxy wrote:
    So, what's the alternative then? What should Microsoft do?
    Trust anyone buying the "pro" tier of their OS to also be knowledgeable enough to manually reboot and apply updates every so often, or include the ability to manually disable the reboots.
    Which is what they had done, until they disabled it with the Anniversary Update.

  13. Post
    Richard7666 wrote:
    Trust anyone buying the "pro" tier of their OS to also be knowledgeable enough to manually reboot and apply updates every so often.
    Yeah but come on, people are morons.

  14. Post
    Devs and engineers are people.

  15. Post
    Richard7666 wrote:
    Trust anyone buying the "pro" tier of their OS to also be knowledgeable enough to manually reboot and apply updates every so often, or include the ability to manually disable the reboots.
    Which is what they had done, until they disabled it with the Anniversary Update.
    sorry but history has shown, you should not trust your client base to do the right thing. I know i dont trust my users. Which is why i disable so much in the thin clients.

  16. Post
    Privoxy wrote:
    Oh I agree completely, but that's why I run Linux at home and osx at work.

    You have to admit though MS are stuck between a rock and a hard place. Sure they could allow you to disable the auto restart but then they are going to have to try and support all sorts of random builds otherwise people will bitch and moan they're no longer getting updates, and the security drama alone would be huge.

    If you look at this from a business/enterprise move it makes total sense. Force all your customers onto the same release at the same time as to make it a **** load easier on your engineering team (hence cheaper, lets not forget MS, like every other company is about profit). I don't blame or fault them for this because I do the exact same thing in my day-to-day job.
    Have you tried using MS support? I did with a surface pro 4. issue was missing shutdown /restart options in start menu.
    step 1, delete temp files & update to latest build.
    step 2, windows 'inplace upgrade' to latest build.
    step 3, windows restore to previous build.
    step 4, suggest backing up and factory reset.

  17. Post
    My adventures this evening with Windows 10


    >Be me
    >Insert new graphics card into mobo in SLI. Same model etc as the other one. Piece of cake. Power on system.
    Hangs at black screen with Windows logo
    >Aight, sh*t happens. Must be a driver issue. Boot to windows media USB to run repair.
    Hangs at black screen with Windows logo
    >Le sigh. Turn off system. Remove new graphics card. Power on again.
    Hangs at black screen with Windows logo
    >Lol. Boot to Windows media USB, then try to boot to safe mode with f8.
    Hangs at black screen with Windows logo
    >Sh*ts getting serious when Safe Mode isn't doing the trick. Might be something wrong with the install.
    >Boot to Windows media USB, goto clean reinstall of Windows.
    >Select 64 bit, loads files to RAM and then...
    Hangs at black screen with Windows logo


    > I DON'T EVEN!


    >Remove M2 drive with Windows on it, plug in spare SSD. Try to install Windows on that.
    Hangs at black screen with Windows logo
    >Mother of god, is this just a bad dream? What even causes something like this?
    >Goto bios, reload default boot keys, turn off UEFI boot loading. Try to install Windows.
    Hangs at black screen with Windows logo

    >I am cursed. What infernal realm have I found myself in? Will I ever have a working PC again.

    >Suddenly remembers I installed new mouse last night. Unplugs mouse. Trys to install Windows.
    >It works first go

    TLDR; DO NOT BUY THIS MOUSE https://www.swiftpoint.com/product/swiftpoint-z-mouse/

  18. Post
    Damn, that was painful to read. Logitech for lyfe!

  19. Post
    To be fair, it's not actually the mouse's fault (afaik), there was more than a little hyperbole thrown in there. As irritating as problems like that are, I get a kick out of solving them.

    I managed to replicate the issue, and then fixed it by removing the mouse after seating the graphics card and powering on, and then removing it for every subsequent boot while I did a clean install of Nvidia's drivers. And now it's all fixed (for the moment lol).

    It did legitimately concern me for a sec though, as it's the first time I've been unable to solve a software/driver issue with a fresh OS install.

  20. Post
    I have that mouse, no such problems you noob

    To be fair, I've seen that happen with USB devices before on clients PC's.

  21. Post
    Wow, a $200 mouse, and it looks like a car with no bonnet.

  22. Post
    I'm siding with Privoxy on this one. Users are dumb, force those updates on them.

  23. Post
    Users are dumb, broken updates are dumb. lose-lose.

  24. Post
    Ugh had a similar issue with a mouse/keyboard all in one. Convenient to use sometimes like in bed, but caused a nightmare when I had it still plugged in during a fresh windows install. The windows installer package had no drivers for it, therefore windows just wouldn't boot on the final restart of the installation process.

    Cos **** booting and finding the drivers somewhere else, right? Just full blown blue screening on boot seems like the appropriate response, thanks Microsoft.

    Sent from my SM-G935F using Tapatalk

  25. Post
    Privoxy wrote:
    Yeah but come on, people are morons.
    For sure, but that's why being able to disable automatic reboots via group policy settings was a good solution. Inaccessible to morons, but anyone who actually needed (like me) it could still use it.