Brexit.

Thread Rating: 1 votes, 5.00 average.
(1 vote)
Results 226 to 250 of 376

  1. Post
    It's also worth mentioning that the UK's contribution to the EU budget per year is about 13 billion after the rebate, ignoring any EU money funding things in the UK (which is actually about 5b).

    The UK government's total annual revenue is a bit over 700b. This means that the net contribution is about 1%. Yep, seems like the UK still has suffificient sovereignty to spend its tax budget and both cause and solve its own problems.

    Source:
    https://fullfact.org/europe/our-eu-m...ee-55-million/
    http://www.ukpublicrevenue.co.uk/

  2. Post
    i am betting the UK will be Scot-less soon as well Maybe even Irish-less

  3. Post
    It seems hate crimes are on the increase in Britain.

  4. Post
    KiwiTT wrote:
    It seems hate crimes are on the increase in Britain.
    that is on par for the course, everywhere around the world.

  5. Post
    Co|d Fire wrote:
    Take the fact that Switzerland has recently ( the 2014 referendum) imposed severe restrictions on immigration for example - something that directly contradicts the EU's policy on freedom of movement.
    Just skimming through and just need to point this out is sort of wrong. The constitution was amended but nothing yet has been implemented. So no restrictions have yet been imposed after more than 2 years.

    The EU did react at the time by restricting Switzerland's involvement and funding allowance in a number of education and research projects. Both the EU and Switzerland are still figuring out how that referendum affects existing agreements.

  6. Post
    Bloody wrote:
    that is on par for the course, everywhere around the world.
    link
    U.K. police chiefs have called emergency meetings following an explosion in hate crimes across the country. The horrifying spike in racist attacks, which have come in the wake of Britain’s vote to leave the European Union, has prompted police to call for enhanced sentencing for those convicted of such disorder.
    source

  7. Post
    ^ Pretty sad. The world is turning very sour.

  8. Post
    TBH: I think because many are seeming powerless to change the status-quo of the current inequitable neo-liberal economic system, that has placed many people on the scrap heap, they are taking out their frustration on the easy targets like migrants (who just like them) want a better life for themselves.

    This is very much a protest against this economic system and those that can work in it (the young ones who know of nothing else) were happy to let it continue.

  9. Post
    KiwiTT wrote:
    TBH: I think because many are seeming powerless to change the status-quo of the current inequitable neo-liberal economic system, that has placed many people on the scrap heap, they are taking out their frustration on the easy targets like migrants (who just like them) want a better life for themselves.

    This is very much a protest against this economic system and those that can work in it (the young ones who know of nothing else) were happy to let it continue.
    I agree. That doesn't make the rise of right-wing populism any less concerning mind you.

  10. Post
    wtf is a "neo liberal economic system"?

  11. Post
    Hamburglar wrote:
    wtf is a "neo liberal economic system"?
    An economic system influenced by neoliberal policy.

  12. Post
    On the subject of Ulster and reunification, I thought this satirical article was hilarious.

    http://waterfordwhispersnews.com/201...onal-ceremony/

  13. Post
    Aaah haaa


  14. Post
    Clavulanate wrote:
    What I was asking in the post you quoted was that if you have literally over 50% of the country voting to leave the EU because of muslims (if that was the only reason) then wouldn't that warrant genuine concern about the muslims? Those numbers to me would suggest more than good old fashioned xenophobia and racism
    Why do you assume racism = Muslims? The biggest recipients of hate in the UK would probably be the Polish and Eastern Europeans, they're certainly at least on par with the Muslims, and they're the people targeted by an EU exit.

    Co|d Fire wrote:
    Except the difference is that Switzerland has negotiated each of these concessions individually ensuring mutual benefit, and more likely benefit to Switzerland overall.
    Except none of this is true, they have almost no bargaining power with the EU, being entirely surrounded by them, and have conceded to every major EU regulation, and pay into the EU, without receiving any representation.

    Co|d Fire wrote:
    Take the fact that Switzerland has recently ( the 2014 referendum) imposed severe restrictions on immigration for example - something that directly contradicts the EU's policy on freedom of movement.
    Which is exactly why it has never been implemented by the Swiss government. Two years later and there's still no sign of it being implemented anytime soon either. That shows you the balance of power between Switzerland and the EU, even when Swiss citizens vote for something in a referendum, if it violates EU regulations it doesn't get implemented.

  15. Post
    I thought the "Independence Day" speeches were f'n awesome.

  16. Post
    It's no2 isn't it?

  17. Post
    s0cks wrote:
    ^ Pretty sad. The world is turning very sour.
    Not an argument, but don't the facts say that the world is safer than ever? Which if true mean that that's either changing locally or this is a media beat up ?

  18. Post
    I guess rising xenophobia makes some people weary. With a shaky global economy and religious fundamentalism acting as a multiplier.

  19. Post
    eug1404 wrote:
    Why do you assume racism = Muslims?
    Because when I asked in here if Brexit was about Muslims people said it was so that was the context I was using.

  20. Post
    eug1404 wrote:
    Which is exactly why it has never been implemented by the Swiss government. Two years later and there's still no sign of it being implemented anytime soon either. That shows you the balance of power between Switzerland and the EU, even when Swiss citizens vote for something in a referendum, if it violates EU regulations it doesn't get implemented.
    Well from what I've read it seems that the Swiss parliament has 3 years to implement the outcome of the referendum. Unsurprisingly there's been growing public pressure to break the parliamentary deadlock and get on with it. Not to mention they only withdrew the formal proceedings to join the EU this year, indicating that the wheels are already in motion. I'd be very surprised if you don't see all of this shit coming to a head this year, particularly as the EU's strength begins to wane.

    Ultimately all this really illustrates is how accurate Farage and others have been in saying that the EU is completely anti-democratic, and the entire project is little more than the attempt to consolidate power under Germany and (to a lesser extent France) over the rest of Europe.

    We're already starting to see more cracks in the EU's foundations - there's a recent announcement of a 40 billion Euro bailout for Italy, conveniently timed on the back of the media hype around Brexit.

    How exactly does the EU expect the Greek and Italian economies to recover? They need nothing short of an absolute miracle. Foreign investors would have to be completely insane to go anywhere near them now and those that are there will be getting out while they can, their economies have been shrinking like clockwork for years, youth unemployment and unemployment in general is skyrocketing...

    Going to be interesting times ahead when everyday Italians start to find the money they've deposited has been gobbled up by the blackhole that is the crumbling Italian banking sector. Not to mention the added social and economic pressure the migrant crisis is putting on Greece and Italy.

    inb4 Italy/Greece start serious discussions about their own exit plans from the EU and get ready to watch Merkel and Brussels scramble to save face.

    either way the whole thing is ****ing toast

  21. Post
    ^ great post imo

    bradc wrote:
    I guess rising xenophobia makes some people weary. With a shaky global economy and religious fundamentalism acting as a multiplier.
    That is true

  22. Post
    Co|d Fire wrote:
    Well from what I've read it seems that the Swiss parliament has 3 years to implement the outcome of the referendum. Unsurprisingly there's been growing public pressure to break the parliamentary deadlock and get on with it. Not to mention they only withdrew the formal proceedings to join the EU this year, indicating that the wheels are already in motion. I'd be very surprised if you don't see all of this shit coming to a head this year, particularly as the EU's strength begins to wane.

    Ultimately all this really illustrates is how accurate Farage and others have been in saying that the EU is completely anti-democratic, and the entire project is little more than the attempt to consolidate power under Germany and (to a lesser extent France) over the rest of Europe.

    We're already starting to see more cracks in the EU's foundations - there's a recent announcement of a 40 billion Euro bailout for Italy, conveniently timed on the back of the media hype around Brexit.

    How exactly does the EU expect the Greek and Italian economies to recover? They need nothing short of an absolute miracle. Foreign investors would have to be completely insane to go anywhere near them now and those that are there will be getting out while they can, their economies have been shrinking like clockwork for years, youth unemployment and unemployment in general is skyrocketing...

    Going to be interesting times ahead when everyday Italians start to find the money they've deposited has been gobbled up by the blackhole that is the crumbling Italian banking sector. Not to mention the added social and economic pressure the migrant crisis is putting on Greece and Italy.

    inb4 Italy/Greece start serious discussions about their own exit plans from the EU and get ready to watch Merkel and Brussels scramble to save face.

    either way the whole thing is ****ing toast
    Brexit was considerably easier to achieve than what would happen for most of the other countries contemplating such a move. The Brits had retained the pound, which ironically also reduces the case for withdrawl. For the Italians or the Greeks to withdraw would require them to adopt a new/old currency.

    The issue here being that because of their economic weakness, the immediate exchange rate would have to be awful. In the longer run that will work in their favour sparking economic activity as their products become cheaper to export and tourism picks up. In the short term however it means that everything they import becomes more expensive including food and oil.

    Additionally, anyone with brains would drain their Italian accounts of Euros before the switch over and convert once the exchange rate settles. In essence you would have a massive capital flight, as you saw in the case of Greece where people were being rationed on how much they could withdraw in cash. That capital flight could, if mismanaged (and remembering these countries are in the crap because they were mismanaged) could lead to bank runs, curtailing of economic activity and a recession all by itself, without any of the other bs around exiting.

    It would be god knows how much short term pain for an uncertain amount of future gain.

  23. Post
    Clavulanate wrote:
    I was actually on the side that it wasn't the case, and thought that idea was purely being brought forward by racists until a few people here said that was a major issue. What I was asking in the post you quoted was that if you have literally over 50% of the country voting to leave the EU because of muslims (if that was the only reason) then wouldn't that warrant genuine concern about the muslims? Those numbers to me would suggest more than good old fashioned xenophobia and racism
    I see.

    Dunno, I guess the mass refugee/immigration problem in central Europe (Syrian/Africans) has subconsciously bought this issue to the forfront?

    I think there are a myriad of reasons why leaving the EU is a good idea in the long run.

  24. Post
    I think you're right (hence Farage's disgusting 'breaking point' banner showing refugees), but it's stupid that it is seen as an issue. The UK isn't part of Schengen and does control its borders. The refugee migration has barely affected the UK - only the continent. To me that really summarises this whole debacle. None of the problems raised by the Leave campaign are actually related to the EU. They're problems of the UK's own making. The result was a populist 'up yours' response to Westminster which has massively screwed over the younger, hugely pro-EU generation. People answered a question they weren't asked, and we have a huge mess to clean up as a result.

  25. Post
    Zealot wrote:
    I think you're right (hence Farage's disgusting 'breaking point' banner showing refugees), but it's stupid that it is seen as an issue. The UK isn't part of Schengen and does control its borders. The refugee migration has barely affected the UK - only the continent. To me that really summarises this whole debacle. None of the problems raised by the Leave campaign are actually related to the EU. They're problems of the UK's own making. The result was a populist 'up yours' response to Westminster which has massively screwed over the younger, hugely pro-EU generation. People answered a question they weren't asked, and we have a huge mess to clean up as a result.
    The youth obviously weren't THAT pro-EU when only 34% of them turned out to vote about it. I you'll probably find that the URBAN youth were probably hugely pro-EU, but the regional youth really couldn't give a toss.