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  1. Post
    #1

    HDR monitors are finally coming and they're awesome.

    RIP laggy ass 4K TVs.
    http://www.pcgamesn.com/nvidia/nvidia-gsync-hdr
    http://rog.asus.com/articles/gaming-...-swift-pg27uq/
    http://www.geforce.com/whats-new/art...ed-at-ces-2017
    27" IPS panels, 4K resolution, G-sync-HDR, 144Hz. OMG OMG OMG

    Meanwhile Team Red is bringing out Freesync 2 which is optimised for HDR.
    http://www.anandtech.com/show/10967/...-of-hdr-gaming
    The trouble here is we don't know if they're supporting the current industry standard for games, HDR10 (which Nvidia's G-sync-HDR is). Ironic that supposed open source advocates like AMD are working on proprietary nonsense.

  2. Post
    #2
    Only IPS? RIP tiny monitor - call me when you get 65" OLED HDR panels - in other words dont talk shit, TV's are made for the living room and tiny monitors are made for Desks, you shouldn't compare them or try to cross use them

  3. Post
    #3
    SirGrim wrote:
    call me when you get 65" OLED HDR panels
    Here you go. http://www.sony.com/electronics/televisions/a1e-series oh shit, my bad it's not a monitor but a laggy ass 4K TV which I don't even have.

  4. Post
    #4
    Wait for HDMI 2.1 to come out, looks like it might render Freesync/G-Sync obsolete, meaning you're not locked to a graphics card vendor.

  5. Post
    #5
    SirGrim wrote:
    Only IPS? RIP tiny monitor - call me when you get 65" OLED HDR panels
    Have you read up on LG's OLEDs? They're absolute trash for gaming. Input lag out of the ass. If you want 1.06 billion colour provided by 10-bit panels + HDR and minimal lag whilst gaming, TVs are not the answer.

  6. Post
    #6
    I don't honestly see how 4K and 144Hz can both work in the near future. Existing hardware simply isn't powerful enough, unless you start piling on cards. However, VR doesn't really work with multiple GPUs, so that on the other hand is a disincentive for multi-GPU setups.

  7. Post
    #7
    Agreed. I don't think 4k 144hz will be worth looking at for at least another year. You need a titan x Pascal to reach 60hz at 4k ultra settings and multi card set ups are still hit and miss, likely always will be.
    I know money is no object for some but there are limits to what I'm willing to spend on things that depreciate as quickly as computer hardware.

  8. Post
    #8
    Why does it need to be 144Hz? Is that some magical frequency? What's wrong with 120? Or 90? Or even 75. Honest question, is there a technical reason?

  9. Post
    #9
    If I paid so much attention to what I read I never would've bought a 4K HDR TV, I ended up buying one anyway as gaming wasn't the primary usage so I wasn't too concerned if there was a bit of lag, but I haven't noticed any input lag when gaming, including in HDR mode.

  10. Post
    #10
    HDR: Over-hyped tech that offers little and demands a lot.
    I've had an HDR TV for months now (some of those blissfully unaware it was HDR, or what "real" HDR even was). Its cool, but for gamers it does not mean all that much. Don't bother to upgrade unless you're also wanting more real estate and more pixels.
    HDR is just another marketing buzz word to try and drum up sales. HDR is not available on PC yet (well not Win10 as far as I can tell), and I don't have a PS4 Pro, but the HDR content I have seen has not given me the wow factor, and its certainly not a magic bullet to make graphics super amazeballs.
    Let this one cook for a while, I would think 2018 is the earliest anyone should think about an HDR monitor.

  11. Post
    #11
    GhoX wrote:
    I don't honestly see how 4K and 144Hz can both work in the near future. Existing hardware simply isn't powerful enough, unless you start piling on cards. However, VR doesn't really work with multiple GPUs, so that on the other hand is a disincentive for multi-GPU setups.
    I'm fairly sure they'll introduce 1440p HDR monitors into the marketplace, Dell has introduced one already (although they're using their own version of HDR, whatever the hell that means)

  12. Post
    #12
    @Eva - why such a hard on for hdr?

    Tap talky walky pro top

  13. Post
    #13
    And when will we see these stiffy inducing monitors here in NZ?

  14. Post
    #14
    ChrisB wrote:
    HDR: Over-hyped tech that offers little and demands a lot.
    I've had an HDR TV for months now (some of those blissfully unaware it was HDR, or what "real" HDR even was). Its cool, but for gamers it does not mean all that much. Don't bother to upgrade unless you're also wanting more real estate and more pixels.
    HDR is just another marketing buzz word to try and drum up sales. HDR is not available on PC yet (well not Win10 as far as I can tell), and I don't have a PS4 Pro, but the HDR content I have seen has not given me the wow factor, and its certainly not a magic bullet to make graphics super amazeballs.
    Let this one cook for a while, I would think 2018 is the earliest anyone should think about an HDR monitor.
    I honestly feel the same about HDR and don't feel it's worth upgrading for. Like you said, I think that HDR is just another marketing term to drum up sales and is a gimmick in my eyes. HDR would only get as much use as displaying 3D content on my TV, which is no more than 10 minutes. OLED panels on the other hand, they look absolutely amazing.

  15. Post
    #15
    I was out of town over the holidays so using my phone for web browsing and general stuff a lot more than usual, and the thing that really stood out to me was how the screen is leaps and bounds ahead of anything I've ever had on my desk. A responsive OLED on desktop around 30 inch would be sexual

  16. Post
    #16
    ChrisB wrote:
    HDR: Over-hyped tech that offers little and demands a lot.
    I've had an HDR TV for months now (some of those blissfully unaware it was HDR, or what "real" HDR even was). Its cool, but for gamers it does not mean all that much. Don't bother to upgrade unless you're also wanting more real estate and more pixels.
    HDR is just another marketing buzz word to try and drum up sales. HDR is not available on PC yet (well not Win10 as far as I can tell), and I don't have a PS4 Pro, but the HDR content I have seen has not given me the wow factor, and its certainly not a magic bullet to make graphics super amazeballs.
    Let this one cook for a while, I would think 2018 is the earliest anyone should think about an HDR monitor.
    U Wot M8?

    Pics on right is HDR and left is standard. If you can't tell the difference then U Wot M8? In ambient light, the difference is still noticeable. In pitch dark room, it's even more noticeable.

    Having HDR advertised on your TV specs means nothing. Is it 8bit? Is it 10bit? 10bit is the real deal. These panels are $3000 and above on average. Then it comes down to how many nits can your panel hold consistently. AFAIK, the only TV in the marekt available right now to purchase that can consistently display well over 1000nits is the Panasonic DX900 aka DX902. KS8000 and KS9000 do not come close to this. Current OLED's can hold 800 ~ 900 nits consistently but OLED will always look the best. The newly announced OLED from Panasonic, Sony and LG at CES2017 are amazing.



    http://www.hdtvtest.co.uk/image/arti...ight-large.jpg

    http://www.hdtvtest.co.uk/image/arti...an-3-large.jpg

  17. Post
    #17
    HDR looks amazing on the right panel, it makes a large difference to the image qualitya

  18. Post
    #18
    technoguy wrote:
    U Wot M8?

    Pics on right is HDR and left is standard. If you can't tell the difference then U Wot M8? In ambient light, the difference is still noticeable. In pitch dark room, it's even more noticeable.

    Having HDR advertised on your TV specs means nothing. Is it 8bit? Is it 10bit? 10bit is the real deal. These panels are $3000 and above on average. Then it comes down to how many nits can your panel hold consistently. AFAIK, the only TV in the marekt available right now to purchase that can consistently display well over 1000nits is the Panasonic DX900 aka DX902. KS8000 and KS9000 do not come close to this. Current OLED's can hold 800 ~ 900 nits consistently but OLED will always look the best. The newly announced OLED from Panasonic, Sony and LG at CES2017 are amazing.



    http://www.hdtvtest.co.uk/image/arti...ight-large.jpg

    http://www.hdtvtest.co.uk/image/arti...an-3-large.jpg
    yeah my UA65KS8000S is shit tier right? The fact that HDR is being blown out of proportion is because I dont have the right screen huh.

    Its tech wank that makes no real difference for gaming. I'm not saying its not cool, but don't try to sell it like its a game changer, because its not.
    There is no reason to upgrade unless you were going to any way.

  19. Post
    #19
    ChrisB wrote:
    yeah my UA65KS8000S is shit tier right? The fact that HDR is being blown out of proportion is because I dont have the right screen huh.

    Its tech wank that makes no real difference for gaming. I'm not saying its not cool, but don't try to sell it like its a game changer, because its not.
    There is no reason to upgrade unless you were going to any way.
    The KS8000 would be my second choice right now with current model of TV's available to purchase. Having a TV that lists HDR is one thing. Having a TV with 10bit panel is another thing. Viewing HDR content on top of that is another thing. Enabling HDR on the TV is another thing.

    I just listed 4 requirements. You certainly meet 2 of them. Is HDR enabled on the HDMI port you are playing games on? Does the content that you are viewing actually has HDR? I recommend you watch the below video and thoughts on HDR in gaming. Also this video is specific to your model TV. He even provides instructions on how to enable HDR on the HDMI port because by default it's not enabled.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vb93PKN10Ew

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hmgmjApwVpk

    Also TV calibration is another thing. A very important thing actually. What games have you played so far that are HDR enabled btw? Probably none is my guess...

    Below are HDR examples of games using it. You have been provided with comparisons for both games and movies with and without HDR. It's very clearly visible in screenshots so it's not like you will not notice the difference in real life.

    http://static2.businessinsider.com/i...e-examples.jpg

    http://static3.businessinsider.com/i...ncharted-4.jpg

    http://static3.businessinsider.com/i...752c-1200/.jpg

  20. Post
    #20
    Heh comparison shots...
    Remember when there were bluray ads at the start of DVDs? Looked so much better eh.

  21. Post
    #21
    you realize all the comparison shots linked above are taken from smartphones pointed at the TV and not some marketing material processed in photoshop? The movies and games were being played in real time and photos taken to show the difference.

    just give up...

  22. Post
    #22
    I think these images only prove that you won't really notice the difference unless you go looking for it. HDR absolutely is mostly a marketing scheme, while it will obviously impact your viewing experience, it's not a game changer.

  23. Post
    #23
    look at the sun in this one

    http://www.hdtvtest.co.uk/image/arti...ight-large.jpg

    there's a huge difference in contrast

  24. Post
    #24
    hackdrag0n wrote:
    I think these images only prove that you won't really notice the difference unless you go looking for it. HDR absolutely is mostly a marketing scheme, while it will obviously impact your viewing experience, it's not a game changer.
    That isn't true at all. I don't really care too much about graphics (I have a high-end gaming PC but still use my PS4 for most of my games), one game I play on PS4 supports HDR, and you certainly don't have to go looking for it to notice the difference, it stood out straight away.

    Whether you care about the difference or not, its a technology that improves image quality, not a marketing term.

  25. Post
    #25
    technoguy wrote:
    you realize all the comparison shots linked above are taken from smartphones pointed at the TV and not some marketing material processed in photoshop? The movies and games were being played in real time and photos taken to show the difference.

    just give up...
    Which I beg to differ because what can you trust when comparison shots are taken from a phone and then uploaded to the internet. It's all about seeing it for yourself with your own eyes really, then you can compare the two.

    I spent a few hours calibrating my SDR TV and it looks nothing like those SDR screenshots, it instead looks a lot different and is much better. Those HDR screenshots look oversaturated, like if I turn the contrast up to max and increase the colour/saturation levels significantly.