Results 1 to 13 of 13

  1. Post
    #1

    Snitches gonna snitch

    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/business/n...ectid=11934260


    She developed a health issue last year and required two weeks off work. She didn't have enough sick leave and contacted her manager to see if she could take annual leave.

    The company refused and after a meeting over the issue, Naiker said she became upset because she believed the supermarket was being unfair.

    Once the meeting was over, she went to the staff tearoom where she had a conversation with a friend, Sialuga Talo, who worked as a supervisor in another part of the supermarket.

    Naiker said she complained to Talo about her manager's behaviour and described it as bullying.

    Talo told the ERA that she heard her friend out without advising her that she felt uncomfortable with her comments and how she was expressing herself.

    Talo reported the conversation to the supermarket's fresh food manager, Daniel McKissock, who asked her for a statement and requested that another worker in the tearoom do the same.

    Talo said Naiker had called her manager a "bitch" because she was angry that others were allowed to take leave but she wasn't.

    "F***, man, other staff are allowed to take leave but not me. Bitch," Talo's statement said.



    so, I think its pretty normal and reasonable to talk with a work "friend" after something like this, and then in the the moment to call your boss a biatch.

    But then that said work "friend" snitches. Not cool.

  2. Post
    #2
    Sounds like she got hard-done by, expressed herself then got fired for it. lmao

  3. Post
    #3
    Reads like no one liked her. Or they were pressured by the 'bully' into snitching. Good to see she got some compensation though, gg.

  4. Post
    #4
    Seems a bit excessive for indirectly swearing at a manager, if it was to their face might be a little different.

    From being in a similar business with having a similar ER team my first questions would be on the following..

    How much notice came with the request for leave ?

    "Once the meeting was over, she went to the staff tearoom where she had a conversation with a friend, Sialuga Talo, who worked as a supervisor in another part of the supermarket."

    Was this a paid break, unpaid lunch time or considered paid working hours? Was this declared a confidential matter ?

    I have more angles but I'm out of work mode and not really that indepth to the situation.

  5. Post
    #5
    eargasm wrote:
    I have more angles but.....
    This sounds like something that someone with no more angles would say.

  6. Post
    #6
    Greek wrote:
    This sounds like something that someone with no more angles would say.
    Ya got me, I only have kurts angle.

  7. Post
    #7
    Seems to be a situation where the supermarket cut off its nose to spite its face. If there was enough tension with her manager for a supermarket to deny a reasonable annual leave request for a medical issue then a) there should be enough evidence to fire her legitimately, or b) the supermarket needs to sort of the management of that department, or both. Getting a judgment against you for such a seemingly small thing, costing thousands of dollars directly or indirectly, would make me livid at the stupidity of it all. The $13k judgment probably ended up costing $30k or more in lost productivity, extra payroll, legal advice, and training a new worker, all because a department manager didn't want to find cover for two weeks of an employee taking leave.

  8. Post
    #8
    What's the point in dobbing someone in for something like this, what could they possibly get out of it?

  9. Post
    #9
    ^ Brownie points with the boss maybe?

  10. Post
    #10
    azarat wrote:
    Seems to be a situation where the supermarket cut off its nose to spite its face. If there was enough tension with her manager for a supermarket to deny a reasonable annual leave request for a medical issue then a) there should be enough evidence to fire her legitimately, or b) the supermarket needs to sort of the management of that department, or both. Getting a judgment against you for such a seemingly small thing, costing thousands of dollars directly or indirectly, would make me livid at the stupidity of it all. The $13k judgment probably ended up costing $30k or more in lost productivity, extra payroll, legal advice, and training a new worker, all because a department manager didn't want to find cover for two weeks of an employee taking leave.
    You are 100% right but often shitty employers can get away with it because staff may not know how to fight back.

  11. Post
    #11
    Frederick James wrote:
    ^ Brownie points with the boss maybe?
    This, or a misplaced sense of duty. I had someone snitch on me for something similar, but nothing was done until it was time for salary reviews, at which point it became a Very Serious Issue.

  12. Post
    #12
    And the best part is that the supermarket making millions per year turned down her leave request for financial reasons.
    Bitch, annual leave is a right, budget for it better you noobs.

  13. Post
    #13
    This just reminds me how petty some workplaces can be. Gosh ...come to my work. Everyone's swearing at each other in some way. When they hauled us into a floor meeting we were expecting to get pulled up on it but nope, just told we couldn't wear hoodies on casual Friday