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    Posts in this thread appear as comments on the following Gameplanet article:

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  2. Post
    #2
    Not too surprising given how Star Citizen has been run from the get go. It's a pity to see the space sim community get taken for a ride with this project, they deserve better

  3. Post
    #3
    Ha good luck. Crytek has been nothing but crap for ages ago. Probably a last ditch attempt at getting some funds for the creditors before full liquidation.

    CIG could argue that Crytek did not hold up their end of the bargain with support for the engine. Given that they got rid of the majority of their devs that knew it, this is probably true. The fact that they went unpaid for months before going and now a lot work for CIG probably won't help their case.

  4. Post
    #4
    Th3WhiteKnight wrote:
    Ha good luck. Crytek has been nothing but crap for ages ago. Probably a last ditch attempt at getting some funds for the creditors before full liquidation.

    CIG could argue that Crytek did not hold up their end of the bargain with support for the engine. Given that they got rid of the majority of their devs that knew it, this is probably true. The fact that they went unpaid for months before going and now a lot work for CIG probably won't help their case.
    From the filings:

    1. Crytek led the creation of promotional and development material for crowdsourcing in 2014. Crytek licensed Cryengine to CIG at special rates in return for promotional material. The licensing agreement allowed CIG to use Cryengine in one game, but CIG developed Squadron 42 at the same time and announced it was developing two titles with Cryengine. Although Squadron 42 is basically a single player version of Star Citizen, it's a separate game paid for separately with a separate release date (clearly not this year, though). The filings say that "the GLA [Game License Agreement] states that "the Game does not include any content being sold and marketed separately," such as content "sold and marketed as a separate, standalone PC game."" Crytek informed CIG in February 2016 that Squadron 42 was not licensed to use CryEngine and a breach of contract, but CIG did not obtain a licence to use Cryengine in the other game and went ahead with their development and release schedule.
    2. Star Citizen originally included CryEngine and Crytek branding. But CIG removed it. CIG publicly said "we don't call [the video game engine] CryEngine anymore, we call it Star Engine". The promotional material for Crytek meant that CIG was granted a substantial reduction in the usual licensing fee, but CIG neither requested a renegotiation of the GLA nor paid Crytek the difference.
    3. The GLA says that CIG could only use CryEngine in the game, but they went ahead and switched to Lumberyard anyway.
    4. Part of the agreement was to share modifications and improvements between the companies, but CIG failed to share despite repeated requests.
    5. CIG posted proprietary code from CryEngine online.

    Crytek are looking to cut the balls off CIG because they're seeking an injunction that prevents CIG from using any code that was developed using CryEngine. The damages are immaterial. In fact, it'll probably cost more to take this to court than they'll get in direct damages. I doubt the damages will do anything for Crytek's bottom line, and from the looks of CIG I don't think they've got any money left and no definite release date for anything. You can't keep selling ships for a game that doesn't exist yet, especially when you're the architect of your own mistakes - like ignoring your game license agreement and switching engines midway through a project. I'm surprised half the dev team at CIG didn't pick up and walk out at that point. But what are you going to put on your CV? Scammed $170m out of people for a vaporware game? Now they have to defend a lawsuit when they've been ignoring Crytek for the best part of two years?

    No, what Crytek really want is to punish CIG. They want "a permanent injunction enjoining and restraining Defendants from continuing to possess or use the Copyrighted Work and a preliminary and permanent injunction requiring Defendants, and all those acting in concert or participation with Defendants, from infringing or encouraging, aiding or abetting others to infringe the Copyrighted Work". That means any code developed using CryEngine. That means that pretty much all the work that's been transferred to Lumberyard would be covered under the injunction. That means CIG would have to start again, from scratch. That'd definitely kill them.

  5. Post
    #5
    Time to get that ninja out Matt! "...because CIG agreed to prominently display of its trademarks in Star Citizen..."