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  1. Post

    Posts in this thread appear as comments on the following Gameplanet article:

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  2. Post
    #2
    You gotta ask yourself "Would our customers pitch a fit if they found out we do this?" and if the answer is yes, then maybe don't do that? 'cos if they do find out, you're gonna lose a lot of business.

  3. Post
    #3
    "You steal our product, we steal your passwords".

    Uh, so, how is this DRM? What were they planning on doing with the stolen info?

  4. Post
    #4
    Damn, I am anti piracy, and anti DRM, but even more than that I am very anti privacy breaching software.

    I would be interested to see if anyone is willing to take these guys to task via legal means. I am sure there is a case to be answered here.
    Last edited by ChrisB; 20th February 2018 at 7:12 pm.

  5. Post
    #5
    I literally can't remember the last time I pirated a game. I think the community has kind of destroyed itself with lacing everything with viruses/trojans/malware.

  6. Post
    #6
    Rii wrote:
    I literally can't remember the last time I pirated a game. I think the community has kind of destroyed itself with lacing everything with viruses/trojans/malware.
    Yup, even getting cracks for games you legally bought becuase the publisher can't get their shit together is a risky proposition. Feels like you're screwed either way in these types of scenarios.

  7. Post
    #7
    Wait... so to combat piracy they're going to use peoples usernames and passwords against them? Countering copyright infringement with fraud and identity theft? Wtf?

  8. Post
    #8
    teelo7 wrote:
    Wait... so to combat piracy they're going to use peoples usernames and passwords against them? Countering copyright infringement with fraud and identity theft? Wtf?
    I think the idea is that they won't do fraud and identity theft, but rather use the details they glean to identify and track down who is a pirate so that they can sue them.

    I doubt the intention was to steal identities and commit fraud.

    This situation is volatile enough without reaching for the worst possible scenario and assuming it is true.

    They shouldn't have done it. They knowingly installed a key-logger on people's computers without permission. Even having that in the software code of a legitimate user horrifyingly bad. It matters absolutely zero that it would only affect pirates.

    It is a thorough violation, an utter breach of trust, and highly illegal for them to install software on anyone's computer without permission. Even if that software is inactive for "legitimate" users.

    Not a single person agreed to have that code on their PCs.

    I wonder, now, how many other similar things have happened... and we just haven't discovered them...

    Is this the first time? Do we know that?

    There is no possible justification to this.

    How could they possibly think it was a good idea? What about family PCs? Son pirates a game so dad's PC gets keylogged? Yeah... right.

  9. Post
    #9
    I like too that when first rumbled he trys to say "it was only aimed at bad guys" then later "we're truely sorry, please buy our next game" Idiots, this is the age of the internet - you can't get away with shit like that.

    Instead of fighting pirates (they seem to still be a thing?) make your game better - don't release with bugs etc

    I can't remember the last game I pirated.. I use to do a few ;D

    come at me Lefteris Kalamaras .. if that's your real name
    Last edited by Snuffles; 21st February 2018 at 12:15 am.

  10. Post
    #10
    Nerin wrote:
    I think the idea is that they won't do fraud and identity theft, but rather use the details they glean to identify and track down who is a pirate so that they can sue them.
    Wouldn't that still be illegal access of a computer system? I'm sure that would be opening a can of worms for themselves, particularly if they obtained the "evidence" by illegal means then it quite possibly wouldn't be admissible in court.

  11. Post
    #11
    "I want to reiterate and reaffirm that we as a company and as flight simmers would never do anything to knowingly violate the trust that you have placed in us"

    Is he really saying that the company UNKNOWINGLY installed malware on all their customers' computers? I mean, forgoing the fact that it's a straight up lie, that's still really, really bad.

    It's just so impressive that he violates his customers' trust, then says to his customers that he would never violate their trust. Why would a bald-face lie help his company's image right now?

  12. Post
    #12
    Th3WhiteKnight wrote:
    Wouldn't that still be illegal access of a computer system? I'm sure that would be opening a can of worms for themselves, particularly if they obtained the "evidence" by illegal means then it quite possibly wouldn't be admissible in court.
    Yes it would. I wasn't saying it was right...

    Just that it wasn't identity theft and fraud.

    Also, I'm fairly sure the whole "obtained evidence by illegal means" thing is only applicable if you are in lawenforcement. Anything civies give you can and will be used. Otherwise... how is a drug dealer going to tell you about something that happened when he was selling drugs?