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  1. Post

    Posts in this thread appear as comments on the following Gameplanet article:

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  2. Post
    #2
    pretty cool if you are already a PC gamer and have a freesync monitor and a xbox or have an xbox, sit at a desk to play on a monitor and not a tv and couch - unfortunately no actual tv panels support g or free sync to my knowledge

    although a g-sync supporting TV will be out at the end of 2018, consoles won't support g-sync because its not a software update, g-sync is done using a extra processing chip - maybe next gen consoles will support this or maybe freesync tv's will come out as well

  3. Post
    #3
    I thought with the tv's that the gsync was in the tv, it was device agnostic?

  4. Post
    #4
    Keen to read more in that if you have a link? Cause on pc g-sync only turns on if a Nvidia gpu is connected so I would have assumed the g-sync tv needs an Nvidia gpu connected as well. If it doesn’t matter then that’s awesome news then you can definitely hook up an Xbox and get gsync on tv

  5. Post
    #5
    although a g-sync supporting TV will be out at the end of 2018, consoles won't support g-sync because its not a software update, g-sync is done using a extra processing chip - maybe next gen consoles will support this or maybe freesync tv's will come out as wel
    Hopefully next-gen consoles and TVs will support HDMI 2.1 fully as that has VRR built-in, so we won't need to bother with this again.

  6. Post
    #6
    SirGrim wrote:
    pretty cool if you are already a PC gamer and have a freesync monitor and a xbox or have an xbox, sit at a desk to play on a monitor and not a tv and couch - unfortunately no actual tv panels support g or free sync to my knowledge

    although a g-sync supporting TV will be out at the end of 2018, consoles won't support g-sync because its not a software update, g-sync is done using a extra processing chip - maybe next gen consoles will support this or maybe freesync tv's will come out as well
    I could imagine that some TVs just could get a firmware update and be all good to go.

  7. Post
    #7
    SirGrim wrote:
    Keen to read more in that if you have a link?
    +1 for source on that.

    Everything I've read suggests 1) it works as every other G-Sync monitor to date 2) That's not how G-Sync works or how Nvidia operates (open source licensing and/or lowering the current premium requisites and rules of G-Sync licensing) but I'd very happy to hear those things have changed.

    Bullion wrote:
    I could imagine that some TVs just could get a firmware update and be all good to go.
    So you think that TVs have a chip that can both control framerate variably and communicate with an Nvidia GPU via HDMI/DP? Not being a dick genuine question, I would've thought it'd be pretty specific hardware but I honestly have no idea on the display side of things.

    I'd like to know what's required on the GPU side as well - obviously with FreeSync or G-Sync you must have either a Radeon or Nvidia GPU respectively - but I'm curious to know if this is a genuine (proprietary) hardware limitation, or simple software licensing and that both technologies could be made compatible with either GPU with relative ease.

  8. Post
    #8
    iRoN wrote:
    +1 for source on that.

    Everything I've read suggests 1) it works as every other G-Sync monitor to date 2) That's not how G-Sync works or how Nvidia operates (open source licensing and/or lowering the current premium requisites and rules of G-Sync licensing) but I'd very happy to hear those things have changed.



    So you think that TVs have a chip that can both control framerate variably and communicate with an Nvidia GPU via HDMI/DP? Not being a dick genuine question, I would've thought it'd be pretty specific hardware but I honestly have no idea on the display side of things.

    I'd like to know what's required on the GPU side as well - obviously with FreeSync or G-Sync you must have either a Radeon or Nvidia GPU respectively - but I'm curious to know if this is a genuine (proprietary) hardware limitation, or simple software licensing and that both technologies could be made compatible with either GPU with relative ease.
    Freesync is a VESA standard. It is run on the GPU, doesn't require a proprietary module added to the monitor/screen like gsync. It's free to use, so Nvidia could easily tell its gpus to work with freesync but won't because they are pushing their own ecosystem. I didn't think there was much to add to make a monitor/tv freesync compatible but need a "compatible with off-the-shelf display scalers that monitor makers can use".
    https://www.pcworld.com/article/2974...er-smooth.html

  9. Post
    #9
    BURN_BABY wrote:
    Hopefully next-gen consoles and TVs will support HDMI 2.1 fully as that has VRR built-in, so we won't need to bother with this again.
    Microsoft have said that once testing and certification becomes available (2h 2018) that the Xbox One X will be HDMI 2.1 certified (with VRR as a supported feature), here's hoping TV manufacturers do the same thing.

  10. Post
    #10
    Isn't G Sync hardware based and FreeSync software based?