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  1. Post
    #1

    Recommend a dehumidifier

    Needing to get a dehumidifier for the place i'm in, unfortunately it just gets too muggy in here and nothing I can really do about it. I've been using those tiny dehumidifier packs to sustain myself thus far but with another winter incoming, i'm keen to get a better solution in.

    Having never lived in a damp place before, I know very little about Dehumidifiers so i'm just wondering if anyone here knows of a decent model? I can pay more if it means less hassle etc.

    Would much appreciate some advice here

  2. Post
    #2
    Also interested in this, so semi thread jack.

    I have an old model, which as too load for the lounge area (drowns out the TV).

    Need something quieter and that can handle family of four.

  3. Post
    #3

  4. Post
    #4
    I was thinking something more like this Mitsubishi Electric MJ-E22VX https://pricespy.co.nz/product.php?p=417797

    or this Delonghi DDS30COMBI https://www.farmers.co.nz/6098134

  5. Post
    #5
    I have a Delonghi DES16EW AriaDry Slim, and previously had a Mitsubishi Oasis something something. The Mitsubishi was a little quieter than the Delonghi despite being an older model (I would have bought a newer one when I moved to Australia, but they don't seem to be in the Australian market).

    I used to put it in the hallway of my house in NZ, in Sydney it sits in the corner of the living area - most of the noise is related to vibration, so it's worth putting it on something if you have solid floors.

    In terms of capacity it's much of a muchness, it really depends on how often you want to empty it (ideally no more than once/twice a day IMO).

  6. Post
    #6
    Additionally if either of you are home owners (or have a nice landlord) you could look into a heat pump/AC unit - although they don't generally dehumidify on the heat setting, so a dedicated unit can still be useful over winter.

  7. Post
    #7

  8. Post
    #8
    I'm renting, and have a heat pump installed.

    The heatpump doesn't heat and dehumidify at the same time. It's one or the other.

  9. Post
    #9
    Haisley wrote:
    I'm renting, and have a heat pump installed.

    The heatpump doesn't heat and dehumidify at the same time. It's one or the other.
    Yeah but e.g. you can dehumidify during the day while you're out of the house

    If your house is really damp and needs dehumifying 24/7 that won't be sufficient to be fair.

  10. Post
    #10
    KevinL wrote:
    Yeah but e.g. you can dehumidify during the day while you're out of the house

    If your house is really damp and needs dehumifying 24/7 that won't be sufficient to be fair.
    I want to dehumidify when my family is at home. Which is at night. The breathing, cooking, showers, laundry rack, that comes with more people being there is the problem.

    During the day, I ventilate the house.

  11. Post
    #11
    Any reason the desiccant one is better than the normal ones?

    Also a little suspect of Goldair but always open minded to good feedback from peeps here xD

  12. Post
    #12
    Desiccants cost three times as much to run (in terms of electricity), but are more efficient at lower temperatures than compressor models.

    If you have a subscription to consumer (totally worth it for their product reviews alone IMO) then this is a good guide/review on NZ dehumidifiers.

  13. Post
    #13
    Can't comment on specific dehumidifiers, but I would like to chime in the often-regurgitated advice about:

    Airing the house as much as possible, not drying clothes inside, and wiping windows as they accumulate moisture.

    My previous flatmates were stubborn lazy ****s when it came to this, they thought I was crazy for saying we needed to wipe the pooling condensation from the windows, their excuse was "its not normal or necessary to wipe windows", lazy dumb****s. Additionally, when cooking they wouldn't even bother to turn on the extractor fan, or open any windows "because its cold". The result was the kitchen would be a literal sauna, water honestly streaming down every window, super musty with the stench of cooking too. Pro-tip: don't do this.

    Basically air the house as much as possible and do everything to remove moisture from inside, especially when cooking and showering. You don't need the kitchen/bathroom to be toasty warm, just your room/living area.

    I HIGHLY rate these devices for clearing moisture from windows: https://www.kaercher.com/nz/home-gar...w-cleaner.html They work FANTASICALLY. Super easy and they REALLY clean the windows. Very fast, and very efficient. I can't tell you how good these are at sucking at moisture, they just are.

  14. Post
    #14
    What size area are we talking about? Whole house, just certain rooms? I always had a warehouse one (Small unit for around the $100-150 mark) when flatting, and it would take 1L out of my bedroom air overnight. I'd probably consider a couple of units if you're talking a big area / multiple rooms. I have tried a few methods in the past, but they require work to the house so not suitable for renting situation.

    Just grab one with a decent warranty and a good capacity. Some will be 10L units, with a 2L tank, which is fine if you like emptying it a lot... Money well spent though, as there is nothing worse than living in a damp house. Didn't take us long to get used to the hum of the thing at night. Was totally worth it to wake up dry! Removing water from windows is a last resort, a dehumidifier working well will eliminate that problem, mostly.
    Last edited by Fragluton; 11th April 2018 at 11:52 am.

  15. Post
    #15
    We went through this last winter and I just want to second the recommendation for a desiccant model. We first went with an expensive Panasonic A/C type compressor model and it was a stinker. So went to Bunnings and got an inexpensive Suki and it does the job well.
    We keep it on a carpet square and at low setting the noise is not too bad, after a while I practically forget it's there.

  16. Post
    #16
    eug1404 wrote:
    Desiccants cost three times as much to run (in terms of electricity), but are more efficient at lower temperatures than compressor models.

    If you have a subscription to consumer (totally worth it for their product reviews alone IMO) then this is a good guide/review on NZ dehumidifiers.
    What are the low temps?

    Assuming this is a non-issue when being used in a room that doesn't drop below 10 degrees overnight.

  17. Post
    #17
    Haisley wrote:
    Assuming this is a non-issue when being used in a room that doesn't drop below 10 degrees overnight.
    Product dependant probably, but I had a look on Briscoes and refrigerant seem to be "effective" down to 15C and dessicant to 0C. DYOR

  18. Post
    #18
    do you have extractor fans in the kitchen and bathroom? Always easier to start at the source

  19. Post
    #19
    Not sure about the OP...

    But for me, I do all I can to mitigate moisture buildup. I have extractor fan on in the kitchen and bathroom when those areas are being used. I air the house out during the day.

    I don't have a clothes dryer. So when it's raining, I have to dry my clothes inside on the clothes rack. Either under the heatpump, or in a closed bedroom with my old dehumidifer during the day.

    My house is really open plan. The kitchen, lounge, dining area, and hallway to the bedrooms are all one big open space.

    My house is backed up against a hill. So in winter, we get much less sunlight. So it's just colder in general.

    Ideally I'll have a sweet new efficient dehumidifier upstairs in the big open plan area. and have the old one downstairs in the office, and use that room to dry laundry.

  20. Post
    #20
    eug1404 wrote:
    Desiccants cost three times as much to run (in terms of electricity), but are more efficient at lower temperatures than compressor models.

    If you have a subscription to consumer (totally worth it for their product reviews alone IMO) then this is a good guide/review on NZ dehumidifiers.
    Yeah i've read that guide and was interested in this model (consumer also highly recommend it)

    https://www.noelleeming.co.nz/shop/h...prod32984.html

    but i'm suspect of the "works down to 1c" claim, i wonder how well it works in wellington sub 15c temperatures.


    Also - my bathroom has an extractor fan and so does the kitchen - we run both regularly but it's an apartment that gets decent sun but some of the areas in the room, the sun just simply can't hit so...they don't fare too well in the winter despite our best efforts.
    Last edited by Infuriation; 12th April 2018 at 1:49 pm.

  21. Post
    #21
    I had a similar model, it worked fine in near zero Hamilton temperatures - on very very cold mornings it would need to run a defrost cycle though (which doesn't take very long).

  22. Post
    #22
    I'll check what Mitsubishi one we have at home and could sell it if someone is interested?

  23. Post
    #23
    KevinL wrote:
    I had a similar model, it worked fine in near zero Hamilton temperatures - on very very cold mornings it would need to run a defrost cycle though (which doesn't take very long).
    Dang. How could was the inside of your house when the outside was near zero?

    I get a heatpump having to defrost as it's got the fan unit outside. But not a dehumidifer that is using air from inside.

  24. Post
    #24
    Cold enough that olive oil froze on the bench, if that's any indication

  25. Post
    #25
    KevinL wrote:
    Cold enough that olive oil froze on the bench, if that's any indication