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  1. Post
    #1

    What do you think of AI in cars?

    I mean AI was a sci fi dream in the 90's / early 2000's. Now we have AI like 'alpha one' pwning the best humans in go. Or open AI in dota.
    How is it that all car manufacturers now seem to have some kind of concept car with AI?
    How good is AI going to be?
    Can it drive a AWD down the beach? in a snow storm? fog ?

    Just been watching some youtubes of car concepts for review like VW ID buzz and Honda EV sport, Subaru Viziv. They lack anything except a commentary on looks. (great looks).

    Is it all being over sold? with manufacturing dates around 2020 it seems like a ridiculously short time frame.

  2. Post
    #2
    For now they can only drive down pre-defined roads - because they have sensors that need to be able to track landmarks such as road markings to know how to stay in the same lane

    I haven't seen a video of someone drive onto a beach and turn on autopilot on a tesla so no idea what it would do, potentially it would just refuse and force the driver to take control

  3. Post
    #3
    All of the "nope". Too many variables in people, roads, and other drivers.

    Currently, nothing but a gimmick.

    Ask me again in a few years, I might be singing a different song though.

  4. Post
    #4
    AnotherLeon wrote:
    All of the "nope". Too many variables in people, roads, and other drivers.

    Currently, nothing but a gimmick.

    Ask me again in a few years, I might be singing a different song though.
    Agreed . Way too many what ifs. Unless all vehicles are self driven it will never happen. But even then, kids playing on the side of the road etc. If you can't stop in time, they won't swerve or choose to hit something else instead, they just slam on the brakes. All I see is a lot of law suits coming.

    I know they require a person behind the wheel for safety but people will relax and not pay attention. Already happening with telsas autopilot crap.

  5. Post
    #5
    I like the Idea of it in theory but it needs to be thought of as a system to make driving easier not a system to drive for you.

  6. Post
    #6
    It's just like drones are going deliver stuff for Amazon.

    I mean who wants drones leaving stuff in the letterbox because they can't be bothered getting a signature?

    They'd be hovering around my neighbour's place all day if they needed one of those.

    Good click bait for Amazon is all it is.


    Item on TV tonight seriously suggested some guy in front of a console somewhere is going to save the situation in a driverless car if it makes a mistake.

    it beggars belief how media can foist this bullshit on us.

  7. Post
    #7
    Yeah anyone whose played online knows there would be too much lag.

  8. Post
    #8
    Bloodline wrote:
    Agreed . Way too many what ifs. Unless all vehicles are self driven it will never happen. But even then, kids playing on the side of the road etc. If you can't stop in time, they won't swerve or choose to hit something else instead, they just slam on the brakes. All I see is a lot of law suits coming.

    I know they require a person behind the wheel for safety but people will relax and not pay attention. Already happening with telsas autopilot crap.
    It's the same issue I raised with using a self driving AWD car on a beach, it ain't gonna happen anytime soon

    They have sensors to track things, they can see road markings, signs on the side of the road, pre defined data that they get from map updates and they can also see people walking so they can track these things, on a beach there is nothing to track but sand so the car doesn't know what speed to travel or where to go and how to get there. To get the beach scenario working would require some true AI which doesn't exist in this world yet, nevermind it coming to cars, this tech could be decades off from not requiring any human input. Until then the driver needs to be aware and be able to take over the wheel at a moments notice as conditions change


    But they are getting better, Tesla's are in some instances able to monitor conditions and traveling distances of other cars around you and can predict when a crash will happen

    For instance



    Like the 3rd one is a good example, it detects that 2 cars ahead the car has suddenly come to a stop and the vehicle just ahead is traveling too close and will be unable to come to a safe stop, so almost 2 seconds prior to the crash occurring the tesla has already alerted the driver of the crash and started braking, its pretty cool tech but its not true AI

  9. Post
    #9
    SirGrim wrote:
    For now they can only drive down pre-defined roads - because they have sensors that need to be able to track landmarks such as road markings to know how to stay in the same lane

    I haven't seen a video of someone drive onto a beach and turn on autopilot on a tesla so no idea what it would do, potentially it would just refuse and force the driver to take control
    You speak of this like it is a problem, but it isn't.

    As humans, we drive vehicles by following predefined roads and landmarks using our sensory organs. The processes are comparable. There is nothing uniquely problematic about a vehicle using sensors to track movement and objects (presumably with greater sensory input than even we have).

    The act of driving can be easily broken down into rules and procedures which is why true AI isn't required, as you noted. Certainly, sticking a self-piloting vehicle on a beach is unlikely to prove much use, but this isn't a relevant point to make. You may as well complain that skateboards and rollerblades aren't usable on beaches. Urban self-driving vehicles aren't designed for this use. Frankly, traditional cars probably shouldn't be driven on beaches either.

    I agree that the software isn't quite there yet, but I think you overestimate how long it will take to realise a reliable autopilot system. I think that such systems will be standard in vehicles in the next ten years, although I would expect manual control will still be a popular option.

    An individual self-driven vehicle isn't especially interesting, but the idea of many self-driving vehicles communicating with road sensors, traffic lights, and other vehicles is where things get exciting. I'd bet money that the future of urban road travel will shift towards autonomous fleets that can be summoned like Uber taxis, and there will be a great reduction in the ownership of personal commuter vehicles.

  10. Post
    #10
    I'd like to see some real world scenarios, like gravel roads, stock on the road, road works / cone lanes / 30km/h / stop & go signs, detours, slips.
    Making a left turn at an intersection with a cyclelane, and cyclists approaching from behind. Keeping a safe / legal distance between cyclists around some coastal roads (one in auckland especially). Roads being shared for sporting events, paddock parking at things like field days.
    One way bridges.

    I mean the list must be exhaustive before we start getting unmanned uber taxis.

  11. Post
    #11
    Lolly pop guys at roadworks aren't going to trust them, that's for sure.

    What the **** is so hard about driving yourself, that you'd want to pay a hefty premium not to?

    Most people like driving, even Trump says he misses doing it.

    It's like flying cars and other such bullshit.

  12. Post
    #12
    Because you get tired and bored driving in a straight line over long distances or in traffic
    Sure, I like driving when it’s doing hairpin corners followed my straights, not stop start traffic or going from Auckland to Hamilton

  13. Post
    #13
    We would no longer need crossings when collision-avoidance systems is installed on every car. Just walk out on the street and cars will automatically stop for you

  14. Post
    #14
    My feeling, is that AI can be programmed to deal with AI.

    AI being programmed to deal with humans? Yeah, nah.

  15. Post
    #15
    gpig wrote:
    We would no longer need crossings when collision-avoidance systems is installed on every car. Just walk out on the street and cars will automatically stop for you
    That’s al hunky dory

    Auto stop collision detection has been around for at least 6 years that I know of and yet many new cars don’t have it
    So it may never come to pass as it would require every car to have it and be working

    NZ has a large fleet of old second hand cars with no plans to clean up the market that prevents swooping changes like this

  16. Post
    #16
    gpig wrote:
    We would no longer need crossings when collision-avoidance systems is installed on every car. Just walk out on the street and cars will automatically stop for you
    The windscreen washers will love that.

  17. Post
    #17
    gpig wrote:
    We would no longer need crossings when collision-avoidance systems is installed on every car. Just walk out on the street and cars will automatically stop for you
    Too many what ifs

  18. Post
    #18
    Ammonite wrote:
    You speak of this like it is a problem, but it isn't.

    As humans, we drive vehicles by following predefined roads and landmarks using our sensory organs. The processes are comparable. There is nothing uniquely problematic about a vehicle using sensors to track movement and objects (presumably with greater sensory input than even we have).
    Our sensory system and how our brain processes that data is far beyond anything electronic we have today. Current electronic sensory systems at best compete at insect level.

  19. Post
    #19
    I learnt my lesson when in the age of 1Mpx cameras I said that "digital cameras will never have as good a picture as film". How have you kents not figured out this is pretty much the same thing?
    I do however live in Volvo's home town, so I see a lot of the developments first hand and know a lot of people involved in the r&d. This isn't just marketing department stuff, all the big players are racing to beat each other to it, the investment is huge.
    As for "never on a beach" etc, how much money do you reckon a forestry / mining / transport company could save by removing drivers?

  20. Post
    #20
    Vulcan wrote:
    Our sensory system and how our brain processes that data is far beyond anything electronic we have today. Current electronic sensory systems at best compete at insect level.
    Which is in many ways better than ours. Insects can have much better light sensitivity than us, see into different ranges and react to movement far quicker than a human ever could and all of this also applies to electronic systems.

    massive wrote:
    I learnt my lesson when in the age of 1Mpx cameras I said that "digital cameras will never have as good a picture as film". How have you kents not figured out this is pretty much the same thing?
    I do however live in Volvo's home town, so I see a lot of the developments first hand and know a lot of people involved in the r&d. This isn't just marketing department stuff, all the big players are racing to beat each other to it, the investment is huge.
    As for "never on a beach" etc, how much money do you reckon a forestry / mining / transport company could save by removing drivers?
    A lot of the problem is over marketing by the Teslas and Ubers of the industry. Everyone else is also throwing huge amounts of research effort at this stuff, the difference is they're not over hyping or promising.

  21. Post
    #21
    We've had electronically controlled transmissions for well over 20 years and they still make poor gear change decisions. If they can't master that I'll stick to driving for myself.

  22. Post
    #22
    AI for mundane tasks like parallel parking, I'd rather do everything else myself

  23. Post
    #23
    Dans wrote:
    AI for mundane tasks like parallel parking, I'd rather do everything else myself
    scratched wheels

  24. Post
    #24
    AI car just about to go up Goodwood right now https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=67IvQwZZLVU

  25. Post
    #25
    see post 20 hours later, still pretty cool THANKS!
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QtVbch-02Fs
    Last edited by Unsettled; 15th July 2018 at 2:21 pm.