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  1. Post

    Posts in this thread appear as comments on the following Gameplanet article:

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  2. Post
    #2
    I think your parents were right given you've now admitted video games are your "passion". They shouldn't be anybody's passion, let alone a child's. And parents paying Fortnite tutors are legitimising videogames as a normal way to spend their time, instead of it being in balance with other things. I find the whole thing disturbing and completely wrong-fking-headed.

  3. Post
    #3
    Tormenta wrote:
    I think your parents were right given you've now admitted video games are your "passion". They shouldn't be anybody's passion, let alone a child's. And parents paying Fortnite tutors are legitimising videogames as a normal way to spend their time, instead of it being in balance with other things. I find the whole thing disturbing and completely wrong-fking-headed.
    Keep doing you buddy

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    #4
    Tormenta wrote:
    I think your parents were right given you've now admitted video games are your "passion". They shouldn't be anybody's passion, let alone a child's. And parents paying Fortnite tutors are legitimising videogames as a normal way to spend their time, instead of it being in balance with other things. I find the whole thing disturbing and completely wrong-fking-headed.
    Why not? Competitive video games promote complex problem solving, creative thinking and interpersonal communication skills along with marked improvements to reaction times. How is that any worse a passion than collecting injuries and accumulative brain damage playing rugby or doing martial arts, as an example?

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    #5
    Tormenta wrote:
    I think your parents were right given you've now admitted video games are your "passion". They shouldn't be anybody's passion, let alone a child's. And parents paying Fortnite tutors are legitimising videogames as a normal way to spend their time, instead of it being in balance with other things. I find the whole thing disturbing and completely wrong-fking-headed.
    Each to their own. I mean it is a legit career path now. Esports money is big. Plus like it or not, it will be in the Olympics soon. It is a billion dollar industry and they want a piece of it.

    I get the hang ups against it but people need to let go of what is classed as normal. It is 2018, shit has changed.

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    #6
    Regarding esport careers, the need for reflexes is so high, you pretty much decline at the age of 25+, by 30 it's over, which is even more brutal than irl sports. So the risk is even more discouraging and not like you can use those skills for a different job.

    Yeah it's an option, bit unless you win a major tourny worth millions it's going to be a rough awakening.

  7. Post
    #7
    yup the prime age for e-sports is 16-25, after that it's a fast downhill into mediocrity

  8. Post
    #8
    Tormenta wrote:
    I think your parents were right given you've now admitted video games are your "passion". They shouldn't be anybody's passion, let alone a child's. And parents paying Fortnite tutors are legitimising videogames as a normal way to spend their time, instead of it being in balance with other things. I find the whole thing disturbing and completely wrong-fking-headed.
    I bet people used to say the similar things about parents hiring tutors for their kids who wanted to play rock music back in the day.

    To me the whole thing's no different from hiring a tutor for anything that your kid/s enjoy and want to improve at.

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    #9
    tormenta is a old kent - old people like to have nana moments

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    #10
    Soan wrote:
    I bet people used to say the similar things about parents hiring tutors for their kids who wanted to play rock music back in the day.

    To me the whole thing's no different from hiring a tutor for anything that your kid/s enjoy and want to improve at.
    Video games have been around for decades, I myself like video games. This isn't like the nascence of rock 'n roll where parents thought it was the devil's music or something. I know what a vice they can be. I wouldn't want my kid playing them or hiring "professionals" to help them get better at them since ultimately it's all they will want to do. Non-parents don't understand.

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    #11
    I'm a parent and I'm okay with this. I don't see how it's different from sporting lessons or music lessons - yes, there are issues if your child wants to do it professionally (but that applies to those other things too) but otherwise it's just supporting a hobby.

    I don't see that competitive gaming is any less legitimate than competitive chess, or golf, or piano playing.

  12. Post
    #12
    Celticknife wrote:
    Why not? Competitive video games promote complex problem solving, creative thinking and interpersonal communication skills along with marked improvements to reaction times. How is that any worse a passion than collecting injuries and accumulative brain damage playing rugby or doing martial arts, as an example?
    You've compared the upsides of one hobby with the downsides of another. Argument invalid.

  13. Post
    #13
    leopardsqueezy wrote:
    You've compared the upsides of one hobby with the downsides of another. Argument invalid.
    Yes, every single passion/hobby has upsides and downsides. That's the point.

    If anything, we as a society should be absolutely stoked there is a competitive pursuit that kids are actually interested in, in light of declining enrolment and engagement with sport in recent years.