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  1. Post
    #1

    Can VOIP (fibre) be used over existing phone lines in house?

    As per the title- if you upgrade to fibre, instead of plugging the phones into the modem, can you plug them into the existing jack points in the house? I understand the copper to the street is cut meaning you can't use a landline, but if you request internal wiring, you can still use the jackpoints in the house for the fibre voice connection right? Assuming the modem is of course plugged into a jackpoint too.

  2. Post
    #2
    You need to make sure the copper to the street is cut. Very important otherwise you risk burning your modem.

    After that, plug the modem into a jackpoint, and plug your phones into the jackpoints as usual and they will work fine. (Unless you have one of those really old school rotary phones, in which case you'll need an adaptor.)

  3. Post
    #3
    nightshadow wrote:
    You need to make sure the copper to the street is cut. Very important otherwise you risk burning your modem.

    After that, plug the modem into a jackpoint, and plug your phones into the jackpoints as usual and they will work fine. (Unless you have one of those really old school rotary phones, in which case you'll need an adaptor.)
    Here's the thing - they did cut the copper (I believe - they said they 'removed' it) and we do have the modem plugged into the jackpoint. 2 other phones are in jackpoints too, and they work. So it all works, except, there's a terrible buzzing noise on the line. My ISP is insistent that "it's because enable removed the copper, your modem is setup to use a VOIP only, so it won't work on the jackpoints unless you reconnect copper, it's called a POTS line, it's $60 per month"

    I'm like WTF? No? But they seem insistent that that's the reason for the buzzing and that's the only way forward. According to them, they've spoken to Chorus and Enable and that's the answer that has come back. I told them we don't need a monthly landline connection and hence dont need the copper to be reconnected to the street, but they keep half-responding and repeating the first part.

    It's worth mentioning that prior to installation I repeatedly asked for internal wiring, and made clear what I wanted out of that, to both the ISP and to the technicians prior to and when they arrived.


    I'm like WTF is going on here?

  4. Post
    #4
    Your ISP guy is.. not very smart. Or at least can't get his head around non-standard setups. I'll also add that this is not their responsibility though, their responsibility ends at the modem. Whatever you plug into the modem is your responsibility.

    What happens if you plug a phone directly into the modem? Any noise? How about if you plug a phone into the socket, but unplug the modem from the socket?

  5. Post
    #5
    nightshadow wrote:
    Your ISP guy is.. not very smart. Or at least can't get his head around non-standard setups. I'll also add that this is not their responsibility though, their responsibility ends at the modem. Whatever you plug into the modem is your responsibility.

    What happens if you plug a phone directly into the modem? Any noise? How about if you plug a phone into the socket, but unplug the modem from the socket?
    No noise while plugged direct into modem, but that isn't a solution for us. No buzzing on the line when the modem is removed, just nothing. Also it obviously never did this before the fibre installation. What do you think the issue is? The ISP says the copper has been cut or removed. We might've thought that the technician either didn't do the internal wiring properly or buggered something up. We think the ISP is somewhat responsible as they're our only point of reference and we asked them for internal wiring, so if that didn't get done due to them not communicating with Enable then that's not really our fault either.
    Last edited by Orz; 23rd November 2018 at 12:04 pm.

  6. Post
    #6
    nightshadow wrote:
    Your ISP guy is.. not very smart. Or at least can't get his head around non-standard setups. I'll also add that this is not their responsibility though, their responsibility ends at the modem. Whatever you plug into the modem is your responsibility.

    What happens if you plug a phone directly into the modem? Any noise? How about if you plug a phone into the socket, but unplug the modem from the socket?
    Also I would've thought that since it does tecnically work (eg we can use the phones over the jackpoints), that this means the internal wiring has been completed by the tech, right?

  7. Post
    #7
    Problem is beyond me, and this is an extreme suggestion... but can you kill the power to everything in the house except a power point / circuit away from where the phone line wiring is in the house? Could be interference from power to the phone line if they have run it side by side or the likes. Perhaps. Just wondering if the old copper line had some sort of earthing that may have eliminated the interference. Just an idea anyway. My VOIP line isn't 100% silent, and I did all of wiring for that myself so know it is away from power lines.

  8. Post
    #8
    Fragluton wrote:
    Problem is beyond me, and this is an extreme suggestion... but can you kill the power to everything in the house except a power point / circuit away from where the phone line wiring is in the house? Could be interference from power to the phone line if they have run it side by side or the likes. Perhaps. Just wondering if the old copper line had some sort of earthing that may have eliminated the interference. Just an idea anyway. My VOIP line isn't 100% silent, and I did all of wiring for that myself so know it is away from power lines.
    Not a bad suggestion. But I would only know how to kill all power via breaker box. Do you think that if a tech came to check the wiring, they'd notice this?

  9. Post
    #9
    I don't know sorry, was just a suggestion to see if it made a difference.

  10. Post
    #10
    If you paid your RSP for integrated wiring on a older house then a new cable should have been installed from the ONT to the copper ETP, connections from the network service lead disconnected & new cable connected to the existing legacy pairs feeding internally. The ONT end of the cable would have a RJ45 terminated and connect to the POTS from the ONT or VoIP port of router.
    Alot of installers will only plug the VoIP lead into the nearest jackpoint and if your lucky disconnect the service lead at the ETP.
    If you pay a wiring maintenance contract the money is taken by your RSP and not the LFC . Your Integrated wiring charge is a one off payment & generally will have small warranty period, so it is up to your RSP to maintain.

    The interference you are describing could be either an earth or an imbalance.

    Fiber installers do not have the in depth knowledge of how copper wiring works full stop or have the meters to do testing as a copper tech would. I refer to them as installers as a technician has qualifications & spent years gaining them where as an installer is out there in about 1 month of training.
    When I was younger t0mby used to take me to school...

    IN STREET FIGHTER 2!

  11. Post
    #11
    DoubleMANTIS wrote:
    If you paid your RSP for integrated wiring on a older house then a new cable should have been installed from the ONT to the copper ETP, connections from the network service lead disconnected & new cable connected to the existing legacy pairs feeding internally. The ONT end of the cable would have a RJ45 terminated and connect to the POTS from the ONT or VoIP port of router.
    Alot of installers will only plug the VoIP lead into the nearest jackpoint and if your lucky disconnect the service lead at the ETP.
    If you pay a wiring maintenance contract the money is taken by your RSP and not the LFC . Your Integrated wiring charge is a one off payment & generally will have small warranty period, so it is up to your RSP to maintain.

    The interference you are describing could be either an earth or an imbalance.

    Fiber installers do not have the in depth knowledge of how copper wiring works full stop or have the meters to do testing as a copper tech would. I refer to them as installers as a technician has qualifications & spent years gaining them where as an installer is out there in about 1 month of training.

    Thank you so much for your educated insight, it does help.

    We didn't pay an additional fee for integrated wiring, we were always told it was just something extra/free you could request from the fibre installers. According to our ISP (a new person, not the dude from my previous posts in this thread) the integrated wiring was performed, though I'm personally unable to verify anything myself - but I would assume that since the jackpoints are working, that this does mean the integrated wiring was performed.

    I suppose this makes me wonder how well the job was performed? Perhaps they didn't do it properly and re-routed our old cabling from the ONT to the ETP? I'm not 100% sure on the details myself, I'm just going off what you said.

    The ISP has suggested we get a sparky in to quote how much it would cost and if they can fix it - I hope sparkies will know what I'm talking about, and if they can tell whether or not it's fixable?

  12. Post
    #12
    DoubleMANTIS wrote:
    If you paid your RSP for integrated wiring on a older house then a new cable should have been installed from the ONT to the copper ETP, connections from the network service lead disconnected & new cable connected to the existing legacy pairs feeding internally. The ONT end of the cable would have a RJ45 terminated and connect to the POTS from the ONT or VoIP port of router.
    Alot of installers will only plug the VoIP lead into the nearest jackpoint and if your lucky disconnect the service lead at the ETP.
    If you pay a wiring maintenance contract the money is taken by your RSP and not the LFC . Your Integrated wiring charge is a one off payment & generally will have small warranty period, so it is up to your RSP to maintain.

    The interference you are describing could be either an earth or an imbalance.

    Fiber installers do not have the in depth knowledge of how copper wiring works full stop or have the meters to do testing as a copper tech would. I refer to them as installers as a technician has qualifications & spent years gaining them where as an installer is out there in about 1 month of training.

    UPDATE: IT'S RESOLVED!

    I thought I should update the thread so people can be informed, and reply to you specifically DoubleMantis since you helped out, but we had a sparky come today who quickly diagnosed the issue and fixed it - he checked the phone jacks, one of them had "a wire still going up to the roof" which he cut and it resolved the issue. I'm not 100% sure of the details myself but he said it was different to 'cutting the copper to the street'? Or maybe it was the same thing?

    Anyway, for anyone else who finds themselves in this situation - the solution may be easier than you think.