Results 1 to 23 of 23

  1. Post
    #1

    Recommend me a knife!

    I want to cut things. Meat. Veges. Not my fingers.

    I'm not super fussy, and would probably want a mid $ knife. I quite like big ones - they make me feel tough.

    I really want something that will keep a good edge.

  2. Post
    #2
    If you're after a single workhorse knife then I would go one of:

    Chef's knife - I like the 25cm Wusthof classic (make sure you get the full tang forged ones, not the stamped ones)
    Santoku - no particular recommendation but there are lot of 'nice' japanese-made knives in this category (Mac Professional reviews really well and isn't horrendously priced)
    Cleaver - I'm a big proponent of the cheap asian grocery cleavers ("Kiwi" brand is good).

    All three will do most things, but technique will obviously vary so it's a bit of a personal preference thing.

    You might also consider a small paring knife for little fiddly jobs - the cheap plastic handle victorinox ones are real good (or you could go the cheap asian grocer route here too), and a serrated knife for bread (I have a Wusthof, but serrated knifes are pretty forgiving re: the lower end of the budget).

  3. Post
    #3
    Cheers KevinL. Good starting point there for me. I'll google some of those names and see what I like the look and price of.

  4. Post
    #4
    I just use a hollow ground skinning knife from work. Had it for about 8 years now.
    We got a whole heap of them for like $10 each and no one likes using them as they are too hard, so impossible to sharpen unless they use the diamond stones, which for some reason they don't like using.
    Only downside is that if you drop it, the blade breaks.

  5. Post
    #5
    I have a Wustof 7" Santoku knife that I LOVE. I wouldn't be without it. It's regularly sharped.
    Spend decent money on knives and hold them before you buy them and you'll have tools that last you decades. I even bought a second one for the beach.

    I have a house full of lovely knives (I am slightly obsessed lol), but that is by far my favourite.

  6. Post
    #6
    For the money it's hard to beat the fibrox handled victronox knives. For a good lasting edge you want a carbon steel so look at blue steels (or aogami super) as they aren't as brittle as white but still hold a good edge vs ss. If you have a steel to quickly sort out the edge then ss knives aren't bad though. I recommend the fibrox boning knife if you ever bone anything or fillet fish since it's got a grippy handle and only costs about $30.

    18cm is a good length, I find anything bigger a bit of a meme and not comfortable unless you're talking about a cleaver to get through bones. One thing to consider is that santoku/chef's knives have a 2 sided edge (i.e. it's a V shaped edge) where as the japanese style knives are usually one sided (kinda like a |/ shape) so it depends if you're left or right handed.

    E.g.
    https://japanesechefsknife.com/colle...-santoku-175mm
    https://japanesechefsknife.com/colle...oku170mm7-inch

    Their whetstones are a good deal too https://japanesechefsknife.com/colle...grit-1000-4001

  7. Post
    #7
    We've been regularly using a Miaybi Kaizen 7" Santoku for around 2 years now. Great all rounder and retains its sharpness quite well.
    Haven't had the chance to get it sharpened yet but it's still very sharp.

    We also have the MAC MTH-80 which a lot of people tend to recommend as well. Don't use it as much but still a great knife. That one is ridiculously sharp out of the box.

    Both are around the 150-170USD mark on Amazon.

    Your cutting technique might also play a part in considering whether to get a santoku or chef's knife - rocking vs chopping.

    Random advice, clean your knives straight after you're done with them. Someone in the house made the mistake of leaving the new MAC knife in a sink full of water, my mum was doing the dishes not knowing there was a knife in the sink. Reached in with minimal pressure and sliced her finger open

  8. Post
    #8
    +1 for Victronox with the plastic handles

    Have 4 of them, 2 straight and 2 serrated, from the Field days 2yrs ago, and they are still as sharp as the day we got them, blades are thin and flexibe too.

    Also brought a Shimomura Santoku a few years ago. Lovely knife to handle, and pretty good all round, but needs a sharpen, will need to look at getting some stone to do it properly. Knicked myself a few times on it at the handle end of the blade as it protrudes just a little bit.

  9. Post
    #9
    Agree with the suggestions on here. Wusthof knives are machine made /finished and precise. There is a French brand called Sabatier which used to be hand made and looks very elegant. sometimes you can get them second hand online or opshops and those are a real bargain because all you need to do then is have them sharpened. The only knives you'll need are the chef's and paring. Maybe a serrated knife if you eat lots of crusty bread and tomatoes

  10. Post
    #10
    I have a full (block) set of Wusthof's and Sabatier's and I rate the Wusthof's more (they seem to stay sharp longer and the handles are more refined - although there is a ~20year gap between the sets to maybe the newer Sabs would be better)...

  11. Post
    #11
    I have:
    -a Shun Classic. Sharp as hell, a little pricey but not unreasonably so.
    -a Global chef's knife. Around $100, lightweight, good all-rounder knife and my most used.
    -a Wüsthof bread knife. Long and handy for cakes and large breads.
    -a Henckels fillet knife. Bendy enough.

    But those Kiwi Brand knives from the Asian supermarket are seriously good for how cheap they are. Light and thin blades so it's easy to slice with, don't have to worry about chopping things a bit harder or scraping bones and ruining the edge because the knives are only about $6.

  12. Post
    #12
    Thanks for the recommendations...time to go shopping me thinks.

  13. Post
    #13
    TECHNOVIKING wrote:
    I have:
    -a Shun Classic. Sharp as hell, a little pricey but not unreasonably so.
    -a Global chef's knife. Around $100, lightweight, good all-rounder knife and my most used.
    -a Wüsthof bread knife. Long and handy for cakes and large breads.
    -a Henckels fillet knife. Bendy enough.

    But those Kiwi Brand knives from the Asian supermarket are seriously good for how cheap they are. Light and thin blades so it's easy to slice with, don't have to worry about chopping things a bit harder or scraping bones and ruining the edge because the knives are only about $6.
    I had forgotten about the kiwi brand knives until you mentioned it. Asian home and restaurant cooks use and swear by them. They are sharp, light and durable for the price you pay, but don't expect it to last a life time. The only negative for me is that it feels a bit too light and the handle isn't very well designed, but it's unrealistic to expect more for the price you pay.


  14. Post
    #15
    chen06 wrote:
    I had forgotten about the kiwi brand knives until you mentioned it. Asian home and restaurant cooks use and swear by them. They are sharp, light and durable for the price you pay, but don't expect it to last a life time. The only negative for me is that it feels a bit too light and the handle isn't very well designed, but it's unrealistic to expect more for the price you pay.
    I like them light, more speed and less fatigue. I don't really have a problem with the handle but for some jobs the blade is too short and doesn't have a long point for things like dicing onions.

  15. Post
    #16
    Mercer Cutlery is a must have.

  16. Post
    #17
    So Kiwi, Victorinox, Wusthof. I think I want a chef's knife for now. Branch out later if I can be bothered. Probably 25cm ish.

    Now to find a good deal. This brand isn't in the names that have been recommended...but it's 50% off...any good? https://www.southernhospitality.co.n...ife-250mm.html

    or just get the one recommended - https://www.southernhospitality.co.n...hef-knife.html

  17. Post
    #18
    I got me 2 x Victorinox. A 19 and a little one. Both plastic handles. I hate the plastic handles, but super practical. I got a sharpener and magnetic knife holder too.

    SHARP!

    Thanks for the recommendations. Nice to have good kit for not much $.

  18. Post
    #19
    I wouldn’t mind a svord chefs knife, NZ made and carbon steel. Does anyone have one?

  19. Post
    #20
    Anyone willing to post some pictures.
    I love knives and got some scanpan ones I love.

    Special is the sharpener? What do most of you use and how often do you sharpen


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  20. Post
    #21
    I have a sharpening stone, has one side lower grit one side higher grit, do a touch up on all the knives every 6 months or so. don't know if my technique is ruining the knives or not but it makes them heaps sharper

  21. Post
    #22
    I use a steel a couple times a month, get my knives professionally sharpened once a year or so

    Should probably just use a stone but cbf

  22. Post
    #23
    Cool thanks.


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