Results 26 to 50 of 51

  1. Post
    #26
    Bitcoin!

  2. Post
    #27
    Never too old for a spanking

  3. Post
    #28
    Equity wrote:
    Interest free loan they pay back for their first car...
    Uni stuff...
    They wont be thinking of it as a hand out haha
    The mistake many parents make: thinking their kids are actually going to pay them back.

  4. Post
    #29
    bradc wrote:
    Thinking about this further, and all the people I've known through life, I think you're actually best served giving your kids nothing and letting them fend for themselves.

    So spend the grand on hookers and blow.
    That is pretty much what I got from my parents, except a documented loan with stipulated repayments etc.

    I hear what you are saying, and most of the savings we are putting aside (started at $100/w and increasing 10% a year) will be for schooling, we plan on sending her to a private school for her highschooling, then if we can pay for her tertiary education.

    The house is because housing is only becoming less affordable, if we can give her a leg up she won't be nearly 40 and just getting into her first home like we were, the market might equalise, or income vs. housing costs may come back to reasonable, but that is not a gamble I am willing to take for my daughter.

  5. Post
    #30
    Each to their own but unless someone's religious or living in a bad school zone I don't see merit in private schooling. Buy another house instead

    Paid for my own uni and bought my house at 24. The work ethic and discipline I had to manifest to do so is my most valuable asset as I've gone through life.

    Otherwise you have to be super smart or super lucky.

  6. Post
    #31
    bradc wrote:
    Each to their own but unless someone's religious or living in a bad school zone I don't see merit in private schooling. Buy another house instead

    .
    Pukekohe,... nuf said.

  7. Post
    #32
    Gonna go all out and send it to Strathallan?

  8. Post
    #33
    dickytim wrote:
    Pukekohe,... nuf said.
    Maybe you have an affinity with the place, but if the school's that bad, for $100+ a week you could get a house in a better school zone.....

  9. Post
    #34
    bradc wrote:
    Maybe you have an affinity with the place, but if the school's that bad, for $100+ a week you could get a house in a better school zone.....
    And still go to a school where the curriculum is sub par.

  10. Post
    #35
    i.e.awesome wrote:
    Gonna go all out and send it to Strathallan?
    Yes that is the plan, she is in preschool there, and for the money is the best option, i.e. higher teacher to child ratio of any centre in the area, focus on fun and education and a good progression to school.

  11. Post
    #36
    dickytim wrote:
    And still go to a school where the curriculum is sub par.
    Well, that's probably a subjective opinion. Kids are likely to do better going to a single sex school over going to a private one. And if their parents can afford to send them to a private school, that also plays a huge part.

  12. Smile
    #37
    dickytim wrote:
    Put it in the bank, in an award saver and add $20 a week.

    We have put all our child's gifts away in a bank account and add $55/ week to it, she is 2 and has over $10,000 in the bank. This will be used for her schooling, and if there is anything left her first car, then when she is 21 she gets our rental property.
    I'd agree with this, Start saving for the baby/kid early so when they they grow up the money is there for when they need it.

    A bank acc is usually less interest than a term investment so as soon as 10k is saved stick it in a a term invest compounding monthly, Meanwhile continue saving again in said bank account.

    Try to diversify with a bit in shares etc as well, And when they get close to 18 years old get them into kiwisaver (although by then the government will probably make it compulsory) and you'll have a nice set of investments waiting for them.

    Just if they do have lots of money tucked away, Maybe don't tell them because they might want a new xbox/playstation/stereo/computer/phone/car/diamond ring/what ever.

    Just my two cents.

  13. Post
    #38
    bradc wrote:
    Well, that's probably a subjective opinion. Kids are likely to do better going to a single sex school over going to a private one. And if their parents can afford to send them to a private school, that also plays a huge part.
    Not at all Bradc. Private school - with all the extras children get dominate public schools. Hence the price tag. Also, the connections / friendships they make also set them up for success I reckon.

  14. Post
    #39
    If you look at our top ranked schools it's a mixture of public and private, single sex schools up higher and mixed further down. Maybe if you're upper middle class your kids might rub shoulders with the wealthier and more influential I spose but theres often special clubs within special clubs.

    Its not like they're genius factories. You're paying extra for less government financial support and nicer facilities and gear.

  15. Post
    #40
    maybe going off scores...Im not sure how they rank / if there are children excluded by not sitting tests...Id also wonder what the difference is in like 10 years....for jobs etc.

    I know that at a private school the core teacher teachers maths and literacy. Then children have specialist teachers for all other curriculum areas / proper equipment the learning experiences children get are of much higher quality than at state schools - as well as learning languages....

    eg. science in a lab with proper chemicals etc. compared to a lesson in a classroom with ingredients the teacher has sourced / purchased themselves...

    Also, students struggling at state school are ranked and then the lowest given additional support (beyond the classroom). Private school, if a child has a hint of difficulty there is massive support put in place.

    I am a teacher at a state school - my wifes aunt is a teacher at a top Auckland private school....I dont think theres anything wrong with state schooling, i think we have an amazing curriculum and there are fantastic teachers in both state and private schools. Just think the chances of success / better experiences are much greater at a private school. For children deciding what to do at University or beyond I think the private school education would give them a better idea of career pathways? Not sure.

  16. Post
    #41
    Kids from private schools do better because they're from better backgrounds. The private school plays a negligible part.

  17. Post
    #42
    bradc wrote:
    Kids from private schools do better because they're from better backgrounds.
    Agree with that...not the rest

  18. Post
    #43
    bradc wrote:
    Its not like they're genius factories. You're paying extra for less government financial support and nicer facilities and gear.
    You’re also paying to have more highly qualified teachers, teaching their specialist subjects. Not sure about you, but my public school physics teacher was also the P.E. teacher and while he knew his subject pretty well, he wasn’t a physicist. My son’s at a private school, and his science teacher in Year 7 science has a PhD in physics. I know what I prefer to have.

  19. Post
    #44
    That's certainly a possibility but not a guarantee. Private schools pay a bit more but not shitloads.

  20. Post
    #45
    Equity wrote:
    Agree with that...not the rest
    Everything else you mentioned in anecdote is possible in a public school, obviously not all of them. Your kids are only in any serious peril at a public school if you're in a shitty school zone.

  21. Post
    #46
    Could be worthwhile for the last three years of high school if the public school you're zoned in doesn't offer IB or Cambridge, NCEA does **** all to prepare a lot of students for university, whereas A levels are much closer to the first year of university or equivalent in many subjects.

    It's frustrating and eye-opening trying to teach stage one students who've managed to get entrance through NCEA without ever learning how to write an essay, especially when resources are stretched and they're far more ashamed about seeking necessary help than the overly entitled students from wealthier backgrounds who suck up resources for the most trivial shit.

    That's all far in the future for OP though.

  22. Post
    #47
    bradc wrote:
    Everything else you mentioned in anecdote is possible in a public school, obviously not all of them. Your kids are only in any serious peril at a public school if you're in a shitty school zone.
    True to a point. The specialist teachers are a big bonus. But yeah some high decile schools in good areas are up there....

  23. Post
    #48
    Equity wrote:
    eg. science in a lab with proper chemicals etc. compared to a lesson in a classroom with ingredients the teacher has sourced / purchased themselves...
    We had a proper chemistry lab at my decile 5 (currently, I'm fairly certain it was lower in the 90s) high school with a dedicated lab technician (shared between the three science teachers) - there were certainly no issues sourcing the ingredients I needed when I did a project on the Belouzov-Zhabotinsky periodic reaction.

    gneiss wrote:
    Youíre also paying to have more highly qualified teachers, teaching their specialist subjects. Not sure about you, but my public school physics teacher was also the P.E. teacher and while he knew his subject pretty well, he wasnít a physicist. My sonís at a private school, and his science teacher in Year 7 science has a PhD in physics. I know what I prefer to have.
    Both my physics teacher and my biology teacher had PhDs; my calculus teacher (John Watson) wrote the textbook. Most of my other teachers had masters degrees in their field, none did double duty (except for the new grad teacher who did English and PE).

    I agree that private schooling tends to push poorly motivated children along better than public (and my friends who went to private schools argue the networking is invaluable), but I don't think the gap is that big provided your child is sufficiently self-motivated - if anything my public schooling gave me a much more rounded experience than I would have gotten at Liston or Grammar.

  24. Post
    #49
    KevinL wrote:
    We had a proper chemistry lab at my decile 5 (currently, I'm fairly certain it was lower in the 90s) high school with a dedicated lab technician (shared between the three science teachers) - there were certainly no issues sourcing the ingredients I needed when I did a project on the Belouzov-Zhabotinsky periodic reaction.
    .
    Apologies for not being specific...I am referring to primary school. No state primary school has a lab facility / specialist science teacher. Quite a few private schools do.

    Also, Specialist PE teachers, Music teachers (some primary schools do still have specialist music) art, and Language

  25. Post
    #50
    Equity wrote:
    Apologies for not being specific...I am referring to primary school. No state primary school has a lab facility / specialist science teacher. Quite a few private schools do.

    Also, Specialist PE teachers, Music teachers (some primary schools do still have specialist music) art, and Language
    Yeah personally I don't know that those things are really that beneficial pre-high school eh

    Like arguably at intermediate