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Results 26 to 47 of 47

  1. Post
    #26
    nile wrote:
    Prepaid sims aren't too expensive there and you can get them from vending machines at the airport for pretty much the same price as anywhere else, from memory around $30 got me 5gb.
    Yeah, that's true, they're reasonably priced. I looked at them as well but because there was four of us I didn't want to burn my battery up acting as the hotspot for everyone.

  2. Post
    #27
    suntoucher wrote:
    Yeah, that's true, they're reasonably priced. I looked at them as well but because there was four of us I didn't want to burn my battery up acting as the hotspot for everyone.
    I normally prefer sims either way just in case someone gets lost/wants to split off.

  3. Post
    #28
    suntoucher wrote:
    Oh, and if you want limited data for cheap, I have a GlocalMe G2 that I'm happy to lend out. It just sits in storage waiting for my next trip.

    You buy regional data packs, and when you get into cell service for that region it automatically activates and acts as both a WiFi hotspot and 6Ah power bank. It can also take 2x SIM cards and feed you local data from them if they're cheaper (like in Cambodia and Malaysia).

    You don't get unlimited data like you would on a Japanese pocket WiFi, but they're about 10USD per day and you have to return it to specific places (that Hiroshima airport doesn't have). During our 15 day trip I bought 3x 3GB data packs for $30USD. Would have been $28USD if I had bought 10GB up front, vs $150USD for pocket WiFI. Was more than enough for the four of us to use Google maps and casual browsing whilst out, and accommodation WiFi when at home.

    Data pricing here:
    https://www.glocalme.com/data_packag...=en-US&giso=NZ

    Offer actually stands for anywhere in the world, not just Japan. As long as I get it back when I need it. Please don't be a dick.
    I just looked at the plan 30 days 3GB for 10 USD is cheap as - will certainly take you up on the offer, though I don't fly until late October. Thanks.

  4. Post
    #29
    Other option is you can get prepaid sim cards at Yodobashi camera or BIC camera (a chain of massive electronic stores usually found in all the major suburbs) like $35 for 7gb or thereabouts for 15 days or something, i can't remember the exact rate. Only caveat is trying to find them in the store so probably not the most convenient option.

    Withdraw cash from ATMs in 7-elevens which are ubiqtuious and open 24/7

    You can get subway day passes for unlimited travel which is probably better than a suica card in your situation. Most tourist regions in Japan have their own day travel passes for buses/trains in that particular area like Nikko etc which is just mega convenient, usually you can buy these at the main skinkansen station when you arrive.

    Nothing beats train travel in Japan, the rail pass seems like a lot but if you're planning on visiting main centres out of Japan, its totally worth it. Shinkansen >>>> planes/buses and if you pay the local/full price its quite expensive and adds up.

    Flying is an option but getting to and from airports is a pain+++ when shinkansen stations usually in the middle of the city.

    If you end up getting a rail pass, you can book seats which is a absolute luxury because normally you'd have to pay a lot more for reserved seats shinkansen tickets. Otherwise you can literally walk onto the non-reserved cars and stand for the whole journey if you want.

    Definitely learn some basic phrases/numbers because no one speaks English

  5. Post
    #30
    incinerate wrote:
    Other option is you can get prepaid sim cards at Yodobashi camera or BIC camera (a chain of massive electronic stores usually found in all the major suburbs) like $35 for 7gb or thereabouts for 15 days or something, i can't remember the exact rate. Only caveat is trying to find them in the store so probably not the most convenient option.
    IIRC the network with this one is bmobile. If you need to ask someone at the shop to find them, they are the tourist sims (you need to put in your passport number to activate from memory).

  6. Post
    #31
    So entering the thread with a complete change of tact - I'm doing a trip up to China at the start of October and we're looking at where to head after. Leaning between Japan and Vietnam. I'm definitely more keen on Japan but am I right in saying that it will definitely cost at least twice as much? (food, accom, travel)

  7. Post
    #32
    Jimmie wrote:
    So entering the thread with a complete change of tact - I'm doing a trip up to China at the start of October and we're looking at where to head after. Leaning between Japan and Vietnam. I'm definitely more keen on Japan but am I right in saying that it will definitely cost at least twice as much? (food, accom, travel)
    Twice as much if you're lucky. More if you're in Tokyo.

    Regular meal in Vietnam, $3-7.
    Regular meal in Japan (no change in Tokyo), $10-20
    Regular meal in NZ, $12-25

    3 star accommodation in Vietnam, $30-40
    3 star accommodation in Japan general, $70-120
    3 star accommodation in Tokyo, $150-250

    Intracity travel in Vietnam, $1-4
    Intracity travel in Japan, $2-5
    Intracity travel in Tokyo, $2-10 (Tokyo is big)

    (assuming you're not flying)
    Intercity travel in Vietnam, $8-$20
    Intercity travel in Japan, $15-$200

    Totally worth it, though.

    Cambodia is also fun, and would take 50% off any of those Vietnam prices. Great if you want a 5 star experience for 2 star NZ prices. My partner and I have done two single month trips there, total cost including flights for two people (which were about $1300 each) were 4k the first time, and 6k the second time. Or $1400 of actual fluffing around the country for a month the first time, and $3400 the second time (we lived like kings).

  8. Post
    #33
    Appreciate the detailed response! Visually that makes it pretty clear for me that after our travels in China we'll probably be wanting to take the cheaper route and anywhere SE Asia is open hame at this point.

    Cambodia sounds epic (in terms of bang for buck)! Interested to see where my mate and I land I may come back for some more advice. TYVM!

  9. Post
    #34
    +1 to basically everything sontoucher said. I found planning train journeys on hyperdia quite fun.

    My info about sim cards is outdated now but when I was there it was difficult to get your own, not like here at all, and most of the places we stayed provided mobile wifi things.

  10. Post
    #35
    suntoucher wrote:

    Cambodia is also fun, and would take 50% off any of those Vietnam prices. Great if you want a 5 star experience for 2 star NZ prices. My partner and I have done two single month trips there, total cost including flights for two people (which were about $1300 each) were 4k the first time, and 6k the second time. Or $1400 of actual fluffing around the country for a month the first time, and $3400 the second time (we lived like kings).
    Some of those resorts look flash as!

  11. Post
    #36
    Whats peoples thoughts on a working trip Japan? worth it?

  12. Post
    #37
    As in working holiday visa? that's what we did. Gf ended up teaching english and was swapped to a 5 yr humanities visa but being self employed made extending mine way too difficult.

  13. Post
    #38
    Yea wanted to explore country and earn money at same time. New Zealand getting a little hohum

  14. Post
    #39
    I'd go for a working holiday but my wife and I are well over 30 years old so getting visas would be an issue. We would have to apply for a job at a company that would sponsor our visas.

    LiQuid.Ace wrote:
    As in working holiday visa? that's what we did. Gf ended up teaching english and was swapped to a 5 yr humanities visa but being self employed made extending mine way too difficult.
    Could you be self-employed and still get a Dependents Visa? Or would you work too many hours or earn too much money for that type of visa?

  15. Post
    #40
    jords wrote:
    Whats peoples thoughts on a working trip Japan? worth it?
    From what I understand the Japanese aren't that big on immigrants. Brad did it though so he would know best.

  16. Post
    #41
    I've read and watched a few things on YouTube, Quora, Medium, and Reddit about what Japanese think of immigrants, and from what I gather, their feelings are:

    - Put our your rubbish properly (this was mentioned a lot)
    - Don't commit crime
    - Don't be loud or have parties at your house (South Americans, North Americans and French immigrants get pinged for this a bit)
    - Try and integrate into the local culture and community

    All pretty fair points. Could be wrong as it's just stuff I've read. One hard issue for immigrants seems to be finding an apartment to live in, as landlords can be blatantly harsh and openly state they don't want immigrants for tenants.

  17. Post
    #42
    jords wrote:
    Yea wanted to explore country and earn money at same time. New Zealand getting a little hohum
    As an alternative, China can be pretty good for a working holiday. The pay vs cost of living is much better over there, work culture is more forgiving in terms of hours (depending on where you get a job) and you can travel around Asia very easily.
    I did it for a few years, so feel free to PM if you have any questions.

  18. Post
    #43
    JoeSkie wrote:
    I've read and watched a few things on YouTube, Quora, Medium, and Reddit about what Japanese think of immigrants, and from what I gather, their feelings are:

    - Put our your rubbish properly (this was mentioned a lot)
    - Don't commit crime
    - Don't be loud or have parties at your house (South Americans, North Americans and French immigrants get pinged for this a bit)
    - Try and integrate into the local culture and community

    All pretty fair points. Could be wrong as it's just stuff I've read. One hard issue for immigrants seems to be finding an apartment to live in, as landlords can be blatantly harsh and openly state they don't want immigrants for tenants.
    All of those examples are massively missing the point.

    The government rules on working immigration and the difficulty getting hired in a good job are far bigger issues. The shit you listed is what anyone would say in any neighbourhood in any country.

    Note to self: Don't move to Japan and commit crime. They don't like it.

    Osiry wrote:
    As an alternative, China can be pretty good for a working holiday. The pay vs cost of living is much better over there, work culture is more forgiving in terms of hours (depending on where you get a job) and you can travel around Asia very easily.
    I did it for a few years, so feel free to PM if you have any questions.
    You're Chinese though right? That's got to be a big advantage.
    That said, a white NZ friend of mine moved her family to somewhere about an hour out of Shanghai to take a teaching job. She's one of those people that would never admit anything bad on social media but she seems happy enough.
    Some videos she made about it: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC8D...fY5OkLX81uqhmA
    They're pretty boring and not really worth watching.

    I also have a couple of white friends living and working in Hong Kong but that's a different kettle of fish I think.

  19. Post
    #44
    Quasi ELVIS wrote:
    All of those examples are massively missing the point.

    The government rules on working immigration and the difficulty getting hired in a good job are far bigger issues. The shit you listed is what anyone would say in any neighbourhood in any country.

    Note to self: Don't move to Japan and commit crime. They don't like it.
    It might have helped if you were more specific and said "the Japanese Government" originally and not just "the Japanese" which is a very broad statement. And considering that the government does not want to properly tackle the issue of immigration properly because of the negative feelings towards immigrants (like the ones I have mentioned), my comments were not so far off the mark.

    Japan obviously needs immigrants to boost its economy because of an aging population and labour shortage. There are opportunities out there for seeking employment in Japan, especially for those who are highly skilled. I've been looking at job advertisements consistently for a few months now, and a good number of them offer visa sponsorship and help with moving costs. A lot of the jobs require some proficiency with the Japanese language, but in my field (web design), some companies do not, especially innovative and modern startups. But in blue-collar jobs, there are huge concerns in hiring foreign workers. It just depends on the job industry I guess.

    Also, they've refined a highly skilled professional points system which allows the person to apply for permanent residency after 3 years of living and working there. It checks your academic and professional history, language proficiency, age, salary, and more.

  20. Post
    #45
    JoeSkie wrote:
    It might have helped if you were more specific and said "the Japanese Government" originally and not just "the Japanese" which is a very broad statement. And considering that the government does not want to properly tackle the issue of immigration properly because of the negative feelings towards immigrants (like the ones I have mentioned), my comments were not so far off the mark.
    Fair enough but in terms of Westerners immigrating to and working in Japan, visas and jobs are more pressing issues than putting their rubbish out. Negative feelings in Japan are pretty easy to ignore if you have a good job and nice place to live.

    JoeSkie wrote:
    Japan obviously needs immigrants to boost its economy because of an aging population and labour shortage. There are opportunities out there for seeking employment in Japan, especially for those who are highly skilled. I've been looking at job advertisements consistently for a few months now, and a good number of them offer visa sponsorship and help with moving costs. A lot of the jobs require some proficiency with the Japanese language, but in my field (web design), some companies do not, especially innovative and modern startups. But in blue-collar jobs, there are huge concerns in hiring foreign workers. It just depends on the job industry I guess.
    My understanding was they recently passed a law to encourage more blue collar workers rather than highly skilled. I read an opinion piece in The Guardian suggesting that they're looking more to exploit cheap labour from places like China to bolster their aging population more than anything else - I think they already have enough of their own tech/engineering guys. I don't know that much about it but it sounded likely.

  21. Post
    #46
    Quasi ELVIS wrote:

    You're Chinese though right? That's got to be a big advantage.
    That said, a white NZ friend of mine moved her family to somewhere about an hour out of Shanghai to take a teaching job. She's one of those people that would never admit anything bad on social media but she seems happy enough.
    Some videos she made about it: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC8D...fY5OkLX81uqhmA
    They're pretty boring and not really worth watching.

    I also have a couple of white friends living and working in Hong Kong but that's a different kettle of fish I think.
    Nah, NZ european (whatever that means). Was the city called Suzhou where she was working? Or perhaps Nanjing?

    But to address your point, you're right, it can be very hard living in China as a non-Chinese person. But it can also be bloody awesome, depends on what you're expecting, what your psychological resilience is like (whether you can accept that it will be bad at times and be OK with that), and how much you engage in the culture.
    Being in a larger city I had a pretty great group of expat friends who I still talk to a lot, so that really helped. We actually got a foreigner Magic the Gathering group going at one of the local MTG stores over there, ended up being about 30 of us who regularly attended.
    I imagine if you were in a smaller city with very few English speaking people you'd have a pretty hard time.

    Yeah Hong Kong is very different culturally, as we are seeing with all the protesting/rioting happening at the moment with the China extradition law...

  22. Post
    #47
    Sorry, I was confusing you with Osiris.

    Yes, Suzhou.

    Expat communities are important for every immigrant community I think. There are lots of close knit Chinese and Korean communities in NZ and although it's less of a culture shock comparitively, all the young NZ and Australians seem to live together in London too. Shared interests.