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  1. Post
    gneiss wrote:
    So, not hilarious?
    Yes, it is hilarious.

  2. Post
    gneiss wrote:
    So, not hilarious?
    more ecstasy? sounds great, finally some positive news about the future

  3. Post
    CODChimera wrote:
    more ecstasy? sounds great, finally some positive news about the future
    At least we’ll be able to trust the contents and not get ****ing ketamines from some idiot in a club

  4. Post
    My friend has a 3d printer and I suggested he print a gun but that's not really how they work apparently. You can make bits and pieces for them but a desert eagle rolling out of the tray isn't going to happen, kind of like the T1000.

    On the bright side he prints parts for his fighting robots for the NZ version of Robot Wars which is pretty cool.

  5. Post
    Quasi ELVIS wrote:
    My friend has a 3d printer and I suggested he print a gun but that's not really how they work apparently. You can make bits and pieces for them but a desert eagle rolling out of the tray isn't going to happen, kind of like the T1000.

    On the bright side he prints parts for his fighting robots for the NZ version of Robot Wars which is pretty cool.
    It is getting there trust me, there is are teams designing 3d printed firearms designed to be fully 3d printed and parts than can't be 3d printed will be made out of basic components that will be created using Jigs that are 3d printed with ECM machining.
    Here is an example of a prototype that will likely be downloadable later this year, no gun parts are required to make it.
    Name:  D7ppedkWkAIAxE6.jpg
Views: 333
Size:  104.7 KB

    You can fully 3d print a gun the .22 songbird is an example of that it has a nail and some rubber bands aside from the 3d printed components.

  6. Post
    I'll take your word for it.

    In NZ ammunition without a license is equally as illegal to possess as the gun itself, so unless you can print gunpowder you're probably just in the same place anyway.

  7. Post
    Quasi ELVIS wrote:
    I'll take your word for it.

    In NZ ammunition without a license is equally as illegal to possess as the gun itself, so unless you can print gunpowder you're probably just in the same place anyway.
    Technically you can make home made ammunition:

  8. Post
    Can you buy gunpowder for $25 a pound in NZ though? It's a fairly critical ingredient.

  9. Post
    Quasi ELVIS wrote:
    In NZ ammunition without a license is equally as illegal to possess as the gun itself, so unless you can print gunpowder you're probably just in the same place anyway.
    At present this is not correct. Ammunition can not be purchased without a licence, but possession is not illegal. Also I do not recall there being a requirement to have a licence to purchase reloading equipment or components.

    Expect this to change later this year though.

  10. Post
    Quasi ELVIS wrote:
    Can you buy gunpowder for $25 a pound in NZ though? It's a fairly critical ingredient.
    I think its closer to $40 - $60 a pound, but yes you can buy all sorts of gunpowder. reloading is common amongst many shooters as it results in cheaper and more accurate ammunition if done properly.

  11. Post
    bas wrote:
    I think its closer to $40 - $60 a pound, but yes you can buy all sorts of gunpowder. reloading is common amongst many shooters as it results in cheaper and more accurate ammunition if done properly.
    Quasi ELVIS wrote:
    Can you buy gunpowder for $25 a pound in NZ though? It's a fairly critical ingredient.
    You can also make it the recipe has been known for awhile now :P

    I guess my overall point is that gun control laws do not stop those who are motivated, home made firearms are getting more popular in places where gun ownership is strictly controlled, 3d printing just makes it easier and more professional. You are going to get reasonable accuracy if the barrel is rifled correctly not to mention the option to use a full auto mode.

  12. Post
    bas wrote:
    At present this is not correct. Ammunition can not be purchased without a licence, but possession is not illegal. Also I do not recall there being a requirement to have a licence to purchase reloading equipment or components.

    Expect this to change later this year though.
    This can't be true. He hadn't heard of this during his short time gathering the wealth of worldly knowledge as a compsi student.

  13. Post
    bas wrote:
    At present this is not correct. Ammunition can not be purchased without a licence, but possession is not illegal. Also I do not recall there being a requirement to have a licence to purchase reloading equipment or components.
    .
    Yeah, that's the gang member work around, buy a reloading kit and the pills, propellant separately, etc., and make it at home.

  14. Post
    bas wrote:
    At present this is not correct. Ammunition can not be purchased without a licence, but possession is not illegal. Also I do not recall there being a requirement to have a licence to purchase reloading equipment or components.

    Expect this to change later this year though.
    Edward Diego wrote:
    Yeah, that's the gang member work around, buy a reloading kit and the pills, propellant separately, etc., and make it at home.
    Says possession is illegal here:
    Every person commits an offence and is liable on conviction to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 2 years who, without reasonable excuse,—
    (a)
    possesses prohibited ammunition; or
    (b)
    sells or supplies prohibited ammunition.

    http://www.legislation.govt.nz/act/p...LMS187300.html

    Are you guys saying homemade ammunition is not "prohibited ammunition"?

    bas wrote:
    I think its closer to $40 - $60 a pound, but yes you can buy all sorts of gunpowder. reloading is common amongst many shooters as it results in cheaper and more accurate ammunition if done properly.
    I wasn't aware of that, I assumed it would be too difficult and economically infeasible to make good quality homemade bullets without heavy machinery.

    SL1CKSTA wrote:
    I guess my overall point is that gun control laws do not stop those who are motivated
    Generally people that shoot up mosques or schools don't make their own bullets. Having the patience for that kind of careful craftsmanship is almost a license in itself.

    WalterKaant wrote:
    This can't be true. He hadn't heard of this during his short time gathering the wealth of worldly knowledge as a compsi student.
    You signed up a new account to say that? How old do you think I am?
    I graduated a couple of months ago so now I'm out in the harsh real world like you.

  15. Post
    @QE - I was talking about the reloading gear not requiring a licence.

  16. Post
    @QE ... define prohibited ammunition... because the government sure as f*** haven't.

    Also, "homemade" ammo is generally considered better quality than off the shelf ammo. People reload ammo for two reasons: costs and accuracy. With reloading you can achieve better consistency then factory ammo.

  17. Post
    Quasi ELVIS wrote:
    Says possession is illegal here:

    Are you guys saying homemade ammunition is not "prohibited ammunition"?
    That’s one of the new additions that came with the law change in April. As yet the government has yet to specify what prohibited ammunition is but it is unlikely to be reloaded ammo. Think more along the lines of prohibited calibers like .50 BMG and so forth or tracer and armour piercing ammo.

    And before you jump on the “why would you need armour piercing ammo” band wagon, you’re right, nobody wants or has the real AP stuff. Where it gets tricky is that a lot of the cheap plinking ammo out of Russia and China is steel core that depending on who’s doing the talking gets defined as AP.

  18. Post
    Quasi ELVIS wrote:
    Generally people that shoot up mosques or schools don't make their own bullets. Having the patience for that kind of careful craftsmanship is almost a license in itself.
    Perhaps you are correct I don't know it would depend on the person themselves.
    Home made firearms and ammunition are not uncommon in places like Brazil, I guess with the way things are going it will probably be easier to make a home made firearm if you do not have any machining experience. But it will still need hours of study not to mention building the 3d printer itself.

    Have to say im super impressed with the work the 3d printed gun groups are doing on barrels recently, an easy to make rifled barrel with good groups who would have thought it was possible.

  19. Post
    I've heard talk of land-owners getting together with other land owners and setting up a pest-control co-operative, where they all contract pest control activities to each other, and therefore can legally justify having MSSA's in their arsenal. I guess there's going to be a fair bit of this kind of thing going on.

  20. Post
    Frederick James wrote:
    I've heard talk of land-owners getting together with other land owners and setting up a pest-control co-operative, where they all contract pest control activities to each other, and therefore can legally justify having MSSA's in their arsenal. I guess there's going to be a fair bit of this kind of thing going on.
    Its a shame that it has been reduced to that sort of carry-on. Pest control isn't cheap and DOC don't do private land. If land owners can't have the necessary tools to do the job then the pests numbers will explode. I've seen it happen in the south waikato. I tagged 90 goats in just under 3 hours.

  21. Post
    A bill banning 3d printed firearms has been put forward (US)
    https://www.markey.senate.gov/imo/me...ct%20116th.pdf

  22. Post
    Another part that has been tricky to manufacture using 3d printing has been successfully made (17 round mag for the glock)
    Trailer:
    https://gfycat.com/whiteordinaryerne

    Back up
    https://files.catbox.moe/fh060k.mp4