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  1. Post
    #26
    Blue Vein CHEESE wrote:
    Any huge red flags with 2006-2009 petrol outlanders?
    If you mostly drive around town, get an Outlander PHEV. Put the remainder on finance if need be.

    You'll save more in fuel than the interest on 10k of finance.

    Say 40KM/day (14,600KM/year). 16c/KWh and $2.20 petrol. 7KM/KWh and 10KM/L.

    Electric 16c/KWh = (40/7)*.16 = $0.91 per day, *7 = $6.37 per week, *365 = $332.15 per year
    Petrol $2.20/L = (40/10)*2.2 = $8.80 per day, *7 = $61.60 per week, *365 = $3,212 per year

    This says a $113 per fortnight (56.50 a week) at 13% interest for 10k over 4.5 years. The fuel savings would literally pay for the finance and you'd get a much newer car out of it that can still do long distance at regular fuel prices.

    Used electric vehicles (over a petrol alternative) are one of the rare circumstances where I'd actually recommend finance over buying within your means because you'll actually be better off financially.

    https://www.trademe.co.nz/Browse/Cat...f551318736-002

  2. Post
    #27
    An Outlander PHV would struggle to do 40km on battery when new, five years later it definitely won’t do that sort of distance.

  3. Post
    #28
    Disinfo wrote:
    An Outlander PHV would struggle to do 40km on battery when new, five years later it definitely won’t do that sort of distance.
    Really? I've never driven one but they say it'll do 50. I don't see why it wouldn't, it has an 8KWh battery.

    My 16KWh Minicab could do 150 when it was new (rated at 160). And does around 90 these days. 110 if I stay in 50KM zones.

  4. Post
    #29
    An Outlander weighs like 800kg more, has the aerodynamics of a brick and was rated like 52km in the notoriously optimistic NEDC. That’s in the summer too, in winter things only get worse.

  5. Post
    #30
    Disinfo wrote:
    An Outlander weighs like 800kg more, has the aerodynamics of a brick and was rated like 52km in the notoriously optimistic NEDC. That’s in the summer too, in winter things only get worse.
    I've just looked it up and it actually has a 12KWh battery. So 75% of my electric only battery new. I believe the 50KM range.

    Have you any experience with one? Or any experience with an electric vehicle?

  6. Post
    #31
    suntoucher wrote:
    Have you any experience with one? Or any experience with an electric vehicle?
    Yes I have an early Leaf and was considering an Outlander PHEV at one point so have spoken to a few owners.

    My Leaf is really struggling coming into winter actually - even without the heater it's like 65km to the LBW with a moderate amount of high speed and hill usage.

  7. Post
    #32
    Disinfo wrote:
    Yes I have an early Leaf and was considering an Outlander PHEV at one point so have spoken to a few owners.

    My Leaf is really struggling coming into winter actually - even without the heater it's like 65km to the LBW with a moderate amount of high speed and hill usage.
    Must be unlucky, my 2012 Minicab has a much smaller battery and is still getting high 80s now after 80,000KM. I do a 72KM roundtrip on 18 for work, mostly motorway.

  8. Post
    #33
    Battery is only one factor of many in how far an EV will go on a charge.

    Anyway to be fair to the Leaf there is quite a bit of room under the first low battery warning but I don't see the point of pushing things, especially not in winter

  9. Post
    #34
    Disinfo wrote:
    Battery is only one factor of many in how far an EV will go on a charge.

    Anyway to be fair to the Leaf there is quite a bit of room under the first low battery warning but I don't see the point of pushing things, especially not in winter
    True, but it's also the major factor when talking about range in a regular EV and is a directly comparable metric.

    There's not a significant variation between KM/KWh between the various models, this article puts them within 10% of the average, with the worst being literally twice the weight of my van:
    https://pushevs.com/2016/11/23/elect...cy-comparison/

    Yours certainly wins on the aerodynamic front by a significant margin but loses in weight (30% heavier).

    Either that, or you drive like arse as mine is mostly motorway. I'm doing around 27,000KM/year

  10. Post
    #35
    To put it into perspective the early Outlander had a NEDC range of 52km on battery only (9kwh of the pack being usable brand new). An i-Miev was supposedly 160km off 14.5kwh (100km using the more realistic EPA method).

    You reckon your car does 90km at best now which is ~56% of what an iMiEV would do when new (according to NEDC figures ). Using the same math on the Outlander and you end up with under 30km.

    As for driving style Wellington is hilly and most of the time I'm on the road it's dark which means less traffic/higher speeds which the Leaf really does not like as far as range goes.

  11. Post
    #36
    Workmate just bought an Outlander PHEV, it has done 80,000km ish, and has a battery still at 90% SOH. He's currently raving about it.

  12. Post
    #37
    I think I've actually made up my mind!

    I tried a few vehicles and I think I am going to go with an Outlander.

    I did find the newer Legacy to be a bit roomier than the old but it still felt quite cocooned. Shame, as it was otherwise a really nice car. Now I've just got to make up my mind about petrol vs electric.

    My daily commute is a flat 22km and I do maybe about 50km on weekends, with the occasional 200km return journey. My power costs 27.2c/kwh. Time to crunch some numbers

  13. Post
    #38
    I've been driving my mum's petrol Outlander the last couple of days and it's impressively economical. 6.4l/100km North Shore to Hamilton, and 8.0 in 50k city driving. It's a current model, though. 4 cylinder CVT.

  14. Post
    #39
    Blue Vein CHEESE wrote:
    I think I've actually made up my mind!

    I tried a few vehicles and I think I am going to go with an Outlander.

    I did find the newer Legacy to be a bit roomier than the old but it still felt quite cocooned. Shame, as it was otherwise a really nice car. Now I've just got to make up my mind about petrol vs electric.

    My daily commute is a flat 22km and I do maybe about 50km on weekends, with the occasional 200km return journey. My power costs 27.2c/kwh. Time to crunch some numbers
    You'll probably end up on a standard user plan with a lower per KWh and higher daily (like $1.80 vs the 35c of low user). So you'll need to factor in possibly needing to switch plans into your calculation. Threshold is somewhere around 600KWh per month where the standard plan becomes cheaper.

  15. Post
    #40
    The electrical inspector at work uses a PHEV outlander to test EV fast charging stations, gets pretty good economy on big trips regardless of being charged as it's not used to commute it's just the best tool for the job as the vehicle needs to be capable of long distance and have fast charging, and has nice torque due to the electric motors.

  16. Post
    #41
    So after "making up my mind" on a 06-09 Outlander I bought a 2010 Subaru Outback from GP's own Riftcreator!

    He's really looked after me, great deal, absolute good bloke!

  17. Post
    #42
    Blue Vein CHEESE wrote:
    So after "making up my mind" on a 06-09 Outlander I bought a 2010 Subaru Outback from GP's own Riftcreator!

    He's really looked after me, great deal, absolute good bloke!
    Heh well done. Great car

  18. Post
    #43
    Had my first ID10T/PEBSAC this morning, but great after sales support set me right

  19. Post
    #44
    ^ Was it going heaps quicker than normal and revving higher?

  20. Post
    #45
    Frederick James wrote:
    ^ Was it going heaps quicker than normal and revving higher?
    Hah so you've had that with the wife too?

  21. Post
    #46
    Blue Vein CHEESE wrote:
    Had my first ID10T/PEBSAC this morning, but great after sales support set me right
    Thems be tricky thing's those push button start ignitions ..... but thanks for the damn early wake up call

  22. Post
    #47
    Riftcreator wrote:
    Thems be tricky thing's those push button start ignitions ..... but thanks for the damn early wake up call
    Let me guess he didn't put foot on the brake?

  23. Post
    #48
    I did, just not hard enough

    Next question, how do I use these "cup holder" things?

    But seriously, god damn this is awesome!