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  1. Post
    #1

    Orcon first to trial residential 10Gbps broadband

    The plan is to launch later in the year. Pretty exciting. Hopefully its not too expensive


    Orcon has hooked up two lucky customers to New Zealand’s fastest residential broadband connections, flicking the switch on a 10Gbps service in Auckland’s North Shore today.

    Orcon boss Taryn Hamilton says that the race to 10 gigabit is well and truly on, with two customers connected to the Chorus 10Gbps trial today, and a consumer launch planned for this year.

    “It’s been just over two years since we launched gigabit services, and we are getting ready to provide a service that’s up to ten times faster,” he says.

    Hamilton says that when gigabit services were launched, many people said they were too fast for consumer’s needs – but now the Gig plan, marketed by Orcon as Gigantic*, accounts for more than a quarter of Orcon’s new sales.

    “It’s important for us to bring innovation to Kiwis as soon as we can. We are about to connect our one hundred thousandth customer to the Ultra Fast Broadband network; we were the first to launch UFB to the home, the first to launch residential Gig internet, and now we are the first to trial 10Gbps connections for New Zealand home users.”

    Hamilton fully expects the floodgates to open once plans are launched. “Gamers, movie buffs, internet aficionados, people with teenagers – we all appreciate a superfast connection and 10Gbps propels New Zealand’s internet into the future.

    Tommy Hohaia, solutions consultant at Vocus and one of the triallists, says he’s really excited by the prospect of a 10Gbps connection.

    “To be honest, working out what to do with a 10Gbps connection is pretty daunting. I’ve had to borrow a computer that’s even capable of handling the speeds. But, that said, I’ll try my best to put it through its paces.”

    While 10Gbps might seem over the top, people said that about 1Gbps not long ago, and we are moving into an 8K TV world where lots of bandwidth is vital.

    “As more and more customers move to 10Gbps connections, we can expect New Zealand’s average speeds to go up considerably; we’re currently ranked 22nd in the world but that should quickly change,” notes Hamilton.

    He says there is one obvious question for such astounding connectivity speeds: “Does anyone really need 10Gbps? The answer is a resounding ‘yes’. With connectivity, more is more. Faster is better, the fastest is best. Especially if that speed doesn’t come with much of a price implication. We all use the internet every day in all kinds of ways and that’s only set to increase.”
    https://www.geekzone.co.nz/content.asp?contentid=22048

  2. Post
    #2
    Sweet, I was just wondering about what to do when my website in my basement grows too big for 1Gb.

    Now I'll just need a new switch and router when it comes to that, presumably my ISP will have it by then as well.

  3. Post
    #3
    Didn't even know Orcon were still around.

  4. Post
    #4
    not sure anyone will notice any real world benefit to 10G at home, the upstream servers and cdns are probably on connections equal or slower than that so can't even pull anything decent down. (plus wireless devices can't even get close to that)

    I would be interested to see what kind of backbone would be required to push through that much data from a significant number of users - presumably it will be over subscribed as per normal especially at the chorus end - can they even handle having multiple 10G throughput on the current kit or will they need to upgrade it already

  5. Post
    #5
    10Gbit, that really is some sci-fi shit. My wired network isn't even that fast so wouldn't be much point for me.

    Gotta say, and I rarely say this about NZ politicians, but they did a great job with the fibre rollout. NZ internet is seriously good now. I am moving to the US next month and I've been checking out the plans in my area and they're pretty sad really. (although Google fibre looks great, but not available where I'm going)

  6. Post
    #6
    ^from the sounds of it, people who are stuck on Comcast have shitty things to say.

  7. Post
    #7
    10Gbps? Now that's beyond the point of diminishing returns. You'd need an upgraded router, probably an upgraded ONT and after all that you're unlikely to see any real world difference 98% of the time.

    I'm all for technological advancement though, NZ internet is absolutely superb when compared with the rest of the world. Funny, because 10 years ago it was the total opposite. But before we get 10Gbps, the world needs to catch up a bit

  8. Post
    #8
    Ahh that's not true. There has been a trial going on of residential 10Gbps with an ISP up around Northland iirc. In Mid 2018 I know some homes were getting 8Gbps down connections.

  9. Post
    #9
    Xev wrote:
    10Gbps? Now that's beyond the point of diminishing returns. You'd need an upgraded router, probably an upgraded ONT and after all that you're unlikely to see any real world difference 98% of the time.

    I'm all for technological advancement though, NZ internet is absolutely superb when compared with the rest of the world. Funny, because 10 years ago it was the total opposite. But before we get 10Gbps, the world needs to catch up a bit
    Yeah too many relatively expensive upgrades to make 10Gb happen. I was going to apply but costing everything up I decided not to.

  10. Post
    #10
    Bobs wrote:
    10Gbit, that really is some sci-fi shit. My wired network isn't even that fast so wouldn't be much point for me.

    Gotta say, and I rarely say this about NZ politicians, but they did a great job with the fibre rollout. NZ internet is seriously good now. I am moving to the US next month and I've been checking out the plans in my area and they're pretty sad really. (although Google fibre looks great, but not available where I'm going)
    You got that right I remember the bad days of the 2000's with Telecom and that utter C#@T Gattung doing everything in her fat power to stagnate NZ internet. And for any of you young whippersnappers not having the pure joy of hearing a 56k modem in action here's what she looked like

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    And now.

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  11. Post
    #11
    GeneralZod wrote:
    And for any of you young whippersnappers not having the pure joy of hearing a 56k modem in action here's what she looked like
    56k? LOL... try 300 baud sonny.

  12. Post
    #12
    Setting up 10gig won't be cheap.

    They'll need new line cards to support it, new ONTs, the quality of fibre joins will have to be tip top (minimal signal loss)..and end users will need LAN gear that can leverage it.

    I guess if you had multiple users wanting to pull 1 gig simultaneously then that could work. It may end up being used by blocks of apartments etc. Say a 10gig line going into the apartment block then shared from there.

    They may also offer 2gig, 5gig etc plans.

    I wonder what pricing will be like.

    Vulcan wrote:
    56k? LOL... try 300 baud sonny.
    Did people ever both with ANSI on 300baud modems? It was bad enough on 2400bps.

    Bobs wrote:
    Gotta say, and I rarely say this about NZ politicians, but they did a great job with the fibre rollout. NZ internet is seriously good now. I am moving to the US next month and I've been checking out the plans in my area and they're pretty sad really. (although Google fibre looks great, but not available where I'm going)
    Yep. I'm not a National voter but credit where credit is due, they did it right.

  13. Post
    #13
    Can't you have multiple connects over the one fiber?

  14. Post
    #14
    Yep, that's why he didn't mention running new fibre

  15. Post
    #15
    I like how they only have a couple of people testing it, yet one of them (the consultant) was such a pleb he had to borrow a PC capable of handling the speed... and probably has no clue how to try and saturate the connection to test it properly.

    I just put in to downgrade from Gigabit to 200Mbps because I couldn't get much over 500Mpbs most of the time in my real world testing over the last year (just me using the connection).

  16. Post
    #16
    HELL KNIGHT wrote:
    I like how they only have a couple of people testing it, yet one of them (the consultant) was such a pleb he had to borrow a PC capable of handling the speed... and probably has no clue how to try and saturate the connection to test it properly.

    I just put in to downgrade from Gigabit to 200Mbps because I couldn't get much over 500Mpbs most of the time in my real world testing over the last year (just me using the connection).
    Our household gobbles up over 2Tb a month now. Most of that is streaming freeview, youtube, sports, netflix.

  17. Post
    #17
    I go through about 500GB doing the same, and that won't change dropping my speed down to 200Mbps of course (will slightly slower my Steam downloads and that is about it). You'd need a household like yours to even halfway consume that much bandwidth most of the time. 10Gbps is really not needed currently for that use case.

  18. Post
    #18



  19. Post
    #19
    LiQuid.Ace wrote:


    Guessing you're a Mirror for a Linux distro.

    Why is it my power company can give me hour by hour consumption but my ISP (Bigpipe) can't.

  20. Post
    #20
    LiQuid.Ace wrote:
    5.6TB

    Yes, well you're using it for work aren't you

    That is the only thing I am not looking forward to when I drop down to the 200Mbps plan, the 20Mbps upload is going to be a kick in the pants coming from 500Mbps - the only other option is 100/100, even 200/200 would suffice.

  21. Post
    #21
    na no torrents/seeding etc. I run a bunch of servers/services from home for various work projects with constant uploading/downloading, checking apis, website functionality etc. I do have a plex server but that usage is fairly minimal

    suntoucher wrote:
    Why is it my power company can give me hour by hour consumption but my ISP (Bigpipe) can't.
    spark can do hourly:


  22. Post
    #22
    LiQuid.Ace wrote:
    na no torrents/seeding etc. I run a bunch of servers/services from home for various work projects with constant uploading/downloading, checking apis, website functionality etc. I do have a plex server but that usage is fairly minimal



    spark can do hourly:

    I know there is capability, it seems to be a strictly Bigpipe thing.

    Slingshot supplied that data in days of yore when I travelled in a horse and buggy and data was transmitted as binary over telegraph.

    I would guess it's because Bigpipe has only ever been uncapped, so people don't NEED to know, but it would still be a nice to have and isn't too difficult to code.

  23. Post
    #23
    suntoucher wrote:
    I know there is capability, it seems to be a strictly Bigpipe thing.

    Slingshot supplied that data in days of yore when I travelled in a horse and buggy and data was transmitted as binary over telegraph.

    I would guess it's because Bigpipe has only ever been uncapped, so people don't NEED to know, but it would still be a nice to have and isn't too difficult to code.
    Why spend money on something they don't need?

  24. Post
    #24
    Linx wrote:
    Why spend money on something they don't need?
    feature parity with competitors ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

  25. Post
    #25
    Linx wrote:
    Why spend money on something they don't need?
    Welcome to capitalism, try the luxuries, I hear they're great this time of the year.