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  1. Post
    #1

    The crazy world of Armenian genocide denial

    Unlike Holocaust denial, Armenian genocide denial can never really seem to decide if it wants to be "it never happened" or "they deserved it". Check out this batshit website I accidentally stumbled across that stole its CSS from the late 90s for an example: http://www.tallarmeniantale.com/index.htm

    The revolting Armenians harass the U.S. Army's supply lines, and engage in hit and run tactics... sometimes engaging in full blown battles, the rare times they can stomach facing American soldiers. Meanwhile, Armenian leaders figure it would be wise to clear out Southern California of their fellow Americans, so that New Armenia can be as ethnically pure as possible. With many of the men away at war, villages are easy pickings, as American women, children and older men are mercilessly murdered.

    WHAT DO YOU THINK THE PEOPLE'S RESPONSE WOULD BE?
    But then they often veer into "THE OTTOMAN TURKS WANTED TO PROTECT THE ARMENIANS, THE MURDERS ONLY HAPPENED WHEN THE GOVERNMENT FORCES WERE UNABLE TO PROTECT THEM AGAINST LOCAL TRIBES WHO WERE RIGHTLY ANGRY AFTER YEARS OF ARMENIAN OPPRESSION".

    Reading the edits on the Wikipedia page for the Armenian Genocide is wild: https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php...action=history

    What I wonder is, are the Turkish really that insecure that they can't admit that their countrymen committed a genocide over a 100 years ago and have to actively campaign against the idea? Why are they that insecure?

  2. Post
    #2
    A bit like the USA and their Native Americans genocides.

    However, in the case above I suspect that the reason why Turkey does not want to recognise it is because it was done by its forerunner, The Ottoman Empire as opposed to the Turkish Republic. And probably why Turkey is OK about the ANZACs now as that was a different regime up to about 1920.

    What is the line between recognition and liability? USA and the Native Americans, Australia and Tasmanian Aborigines, etc.

    History changes the allegiances and character of nations over time. e.g. Germany is now an ally.
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  3. Post
    #3
    Hahaha, well, I guess Germany did take part in D-Day.