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  1. Post
    #1

    Power line issues

    So Iíve been using a TP Link TL-PA4010P kit to connect to my dads default ďVodafone fibre setupĒ
    Up until a few days ago ďitís just workedĒ but recently Iíve been waking up and the computer doesnít have any internet connection, itís connected to an un-identified network, but with no internet.

    My theory is, that my computer(and or power line kit) arenít being assigned an IP by the rubbish Vodafone router, I managed to fix it last night by resetting the router for 30 seconds. But had mild performance (latency variation with 90 ping on rocket league Oceania servers)

    Hereís what Ipconfig shows
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    Iíve tried
    netsh int ip reset resettcpip.txt
    netsh winhttp reset proxy
    netsh int ip reset
    ipconfig /release
    ipconfig /renew
    ipconfig /flushdns
    netsh winsock reset

    And I can access the login page for the router (192.168.1.254) but then the request times out soon after.
    ...and of course as I finish typing this, the internet kicks into life, but this seems a regular occurrence, do I have to wait 30 mins every day for the shitty router to sort itís shitty shit out?

  2. Post
    #2
    I've never had anything but issues with those powerline adapters, if that helps

  3. Post
    #3
    SirGrim wrote:
    I've never had anything but issues with those powerline adapters, if that helps
    It does help thanks. I forgot to say in the initial post that all other devices in the house (all wifi based) are functioning normally with normal speeds/pings. I just tried a ping test to trademe, max was 1274ms!

  4. Post
    #4
    I've got a TP link power line adapter kit. It sucks depending on which Hotpoint it goes into throughout the house and the age of the wiring. I also get random disconnects which require a disconnect, re-enable of the ethernet adapter or a flick on/off of the Hotpoint switch to get it going again. I also get annoying static on my speakers from it.

    if that helps..

  5. Post
    #5
    Pxndx wrote:
    I've got a TP link power line adapter kit. It sucks depending on which Hotpoint it goes into throughout the house and the age of the wiring. I also get random disconnects which require a disconnect, re-enable of the ethernet adapter or a flick on/off of the Hotpoint switch to get it going again. I also get annoying static on my speakers from it.

    if that helps..
    That pretty much sums up my experience - mine were d-link adapters, so it's not a tp-link issues. It's that powerline adapters are just bad

  6. Post
    #6
    Sorry for being random but I'm currently having issues with my wifi extender. Are powerline adapters a better option?

  7. Post
    #7
    nah if i ran the washer/dryer the speed would drop for mine , I went with mesh wifi the netgear orbi in ap mode use main router to supply net plug into orbi router then use the satelite routers in my room and living room for wifi, they have ethernet ports on the back aswell so you can plug in a wired connection to use over the mesh network.

  8. Post
    #8
    Ins0mn1ac wrote:
    Sorry for being random but I'm currently having issues with my wifi extender. Are powerline adapters a better option?
    I dropped an extender for these as I found it better for gaming in my place compared to wifi. The constant down/up stream of gaming would keep it connected. It's just the loading of pages or videos where it doesn't require a continuous stream that it would drop connection at times. I've got a ping script that runs in the background of windows that lessens the issue.

    The speaker static noise issue, which happens when it's taking on a stream of activity is annoying, but I have a sweet spot on my volume knob where it almost silences it.

    Though in saying all this, I'm not sure how it will cope if you're far enough that you need an extender. My power line adapters are in the same room, on opposite sides of the wall connected into a network bridge I set up. I had them on another setup where the computer was a few rooms away from the router and there was too much line static/slow connection due to the distance (though could be due to old wiring).

  9. Post
    #9
    As I understand Powerline is a layer 1 device, it doesn't have a MAC address or get an IP address from the router so no switching or routing. Its purely physical which means the quality of the service it delivers is based on the quality and age of the wiring in your house, unless there has been significant jumps in powerline tech since I last checked. Do make sure you're plugging it directly into a power socket (not into a power board) at both ends to get the best performance. Like plugging an adsl connection into a phone extension cable, the quality is very temperamental depending on how many additional 'jumps' are in line between router and host.

    Anecdotally I've used them for around 5 years and had zero issues whatsoever.

  10. Post
    #10
    Zero issues here aswell, using them since 2011.
    House was built 2005, also had zero issues at my grandparents house which was built in the 70's

  11. Post
    #11
    What model adapters are you using?

  12. Post
    #12
    Tp link av2000 x 4 currently.
    Was using the tp-link with the built in WiFi before this.
    And some netgear av200 ones before that

  13. Post
    #13
    Install the TP Link Powerline utility. When your connection drops, run it and see if both your powerline adapters have connectivity to each other like below. If you only see one adapter then it's not an issue with your router.

    https://static.tp-link.com/2018/2018...Win_180816.zip

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  14. Post
    #14
    So with powerline adaptors do you need one for each device you want to connect eg. one for the router, one for the PC & one for the PS4? What if you are using a power brick on that outlet will the adaptor still work on all devices plugged into that same brick?

  15. Post
    #15
    Ins0mn1ac wrote:
    So with powerline adaptors do you need one for each device you want to connect eg. one for the router, one for the PC & one for the PS4?
    Depends how many ports are on the adaptor. There are adapters out there with 3x ethernet ports and ones with only a single port.

    Ins0mn1ac wrote:
    What if you are using a power brick on that outlet will the adaptor still work on all devices plugged into that same brick?
    Ideally buy an adaptor with an AC power pass through. You plug the adaptor into the wall and your power brick plugs into the adaptor. Adaptors should always be plugged into a wall socket and not into an adaptor for optimal performance.

  16. Post
    #16
    sweet thx would you say this is a good one https://www.pbtech.co.nz/product/NET...ne-Kit-with-AC

    Also how does it work with surge protectors? I read one review saying the adaptors don't work well with power bricks with built in surge protectors

  17. Post
    #17
    You must plug the powerline adapter directly in to the wall socket, end of. Do not use power brick first, do not use power board first, do not use surge protector first. Get a powerline adapter with AC passthrough like Linkzor recommended and plug your powerboard into that.

    The one you linked is a very high end one doing 1.3Gbps and has passthrough for your powerboard to be plugged into. Most adapters on the market are 200-400Mbps speed.

  18. Post
    #18
    Also those speeds that are advertised are theoretical maximum speeds but in the real world you would probably see 1/3 to 1/5 of that.

    I have the TP-Link TL-PA9020P (rated at 2gbps apparently which sounds like BS lol) and these are the speeds I'm getting on my Gigabit UFB connection.

    HTPC connected directly to router:
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    Gaming PC connected via Powerline (approx 8m away from router):
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    I can get better speeds on 802.11ac wifi but nowhere near the stability that Powerline gives.

  19. Post
    #19
    hmmm that powerline speed seems a bit low to me. I thought it would be much closer to the router speed. Speed is the main priority for me so I'd be very disappointed if it ended up slower than my extender speeds. Stability hasn't really been an issue. Oh well obviously everyone's results vary so I guess the only way to know for sure is to try it for myself.

  20. Post
    #20
    Think that's just an abnormal test, he's gets within 120mbps on the upload side. I get within 100-150mbps of my max speeds and my powerline goes right to the other end of the house

  21. Post
    #21
    My little brother has been running his gaming desktop off powerline for years, no drama. And he plays teenager, latency sensitive games like LoL and Fortnite.

    Have you set up any static IPs? Could DHCP have assigned a lease to the same IP that your father's machine is forcing? That would explain the on-off behaviour, and the IP config where you've got a 192 address (correctly configured) rather than a 169.