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  1. Post
    #1

    How do you manage/track your finances? (Budgeting, Tracking Apps etc)

    So I recently came across an app called Pocketsmith, which I thought might be cool to try. I signed up, hated it after an hour.

    The idea of it pulling in my bank feeds appealed to me, but I soon realised this doesn't actually save you much time.
    I plan on using Wave, but I'd still like to know what everyone else does for this sort of thing.

    So what do you use?

  2. Post
    #2
    Budget spreadsheet broken down monthly, then when the bigger bills come in, or we have 3 mortgage payments in a month I break it down to weekly.

    My biggest budgeting issue is the Mrs. has no ****ing idea what she is spending, or how much money we have.

  3. Post
    #3
    What are you needing to track / for what reason?

    If you just want to budget, give yourself a small amount of "sanity money" a week to spend, save the rest for bills / whatever.

  4. Post
    #4
    I use YNAB. It does have bank integration but not in Aus/NZ, so that may or may not come at some point in the future. The mobile app is very good for recording transactions on the go, so inputting everything manually is not really that big of a problem. I manage all the finances for myself and my wife and do almost all the day-to-day shopping and thus its not a big deal for me to do it all myself, but if you have a SO and a different financial arrangement, you would need buy-in from them as well. There's an automatic weekly transfer from our joint account to my wife's personal bank account for her to use on whatever she wants; that account is untracked for the purposes of YNAB.

    YNAB is a whole system and approach to money, though. Its based on envelope budgeting, not forecast budgeting. You assign purposes to the money you have, not future earnings. It does require some attention to input everything, and you have to want to use the system that its based on for it to be really functional. The upside is that you always know exactly how much you can spend on any given item and, given you've budgeted for it, always know that you have money for bills ahead of time.

  5. Post
    #5
    I use Excel. Excels my boy from way back

  6. Post
    #6
    I used to try and use apps etc.. never could stick to it / forgot / in a hurry

    prefer to just get out a certain amount at the start of the month and pull money from it to pay bills. my wallet has a note divider so I just split between expenses and extra's this way.

    sounds primitive but works for me

  7. Post
    #7
    I'm using pocketsmith, which is a subscription online service. It will pull directly from all my bank feeds. Helped me categorize and sort out where everything is going, track budgets etc. Yeah it probably could be done via excel or whatever, but this works well for me.

  8. Post
    #8
    Nothing... Money comes in and out and I have no idea what it's doing.

    I have some though, I know that much at least.

  9. Post
    #9
    azarat wrote:
    I use YNAB. It does have bank integration but not in Aus/NZ, so that may or may not come at some point in the future. The mobile app is very good for recording transactions on the go, so inputting everything manually is not really that big of a problem. I manage all the finances for myself and my wife and do almost all the day-to-day shopping and thus its not a big deal for me to do it all myself, but if you have a SO and a different financial arrangement, you would need buy-in from them as well. There's an automatic weekly transfer from our joint account to my wife's personal bank account for her to use on whatever she wants; that account is untracked for the purposes of YNAB.

    YNAB is a whole system and approach to money, though. Its based on envelope budgeting, not forecast budgeting. You assign purposes to the money you have, not future earnings. It does require some attention to input everything, and you have to want to use the system that its based on for it to be really functional. The upside is that you always know exactly how much you can spend on any given item and, given you've budgeted for it, always know that you have money for bills ahead of time.
    I like YNAB, and just to point out - it can import OFX files, which Kiwibank at least can export.

  10. Post
    #10
    I use excel. Since most (99% of my expenses) are through the cards (DD, credit card, and debit card), then it is easy to track down. I have been doing this (keeping expenses; income is known from payslip) since my first full time job. Good to know how much money I keep over the years...

  11. Post
    #11
    I have always used an excel spreadsheet.
    Income at top, bills next, leaves X.
    Deduct food, petrol and allow a bit for misc (into savings) for unexpected things, drs and clothes etc.
    Whats left is what can be spent.
    Usually bugger all, but if you don't stick to it, that's how the debt climbs.

  12. Post
    #12
    Privoxy wrote:
    Nothing... Money comes in and out and I have no idea what it's doing.

    I have some though, I know that much at least.
    This.

    Have a job and don't take on unnecessary debt/costs you don't have spare cash for (TV/phone/whatever on finance, SKY TV, high rent house, 6L V8 ) and it's difficult not to come out ahead. Need children (although I'd call that an unnecessary cost) or debilitating sickness not to.

    Literally picked a 2010 diesel i30 today for $3k. I can afford a much more expensive vehicle but don't see the financial sense in doing so.

  13. Post
    #13
    ^that sounds cheap. how many kms? not that it matters when its 3k and a hyundai you can drive it for ages and will still probably be fine

  14. Post
    #14
    focus wrote:
    ^that sounds cheap. how many kms? not that it matters when its 3k and a hyundai you can drive it for ages and will still probably be fine
    330, I've literally never owned a diesel that has done fewer than 300 and I've gone through quite a few of them now but high KMs scare people away and it's great for stingy bastards like me who aren't scared of googling problems and learning to fix them.

    From a dealer, so covered by CGA and the MVTA, fresh WoF, service, whatever. Apparently difficult to start in the cold but I can get a set of glow plugs from eBay for $40 so I'm not too worried. Nothing major on the body front, but plenty of stone chips etc when you look close up.

  15. Post
    #15
    dickytim wrote:
    Budget spreadsheet broken down monthly, then when the bigger bills come in, or we have 3 mortgage payments in a month I break it down to weekly.

    My biggest budgeting issue is the Mrs. has no ****ing idea what she is spending, or how much money we have.
    Get a new missus, even better, don't have one at all.

    Just get a hooker when you feel the need, it works out much cheaper, and you get a different vagine each time.