Anyone in Melbourne need an IT job? - IT qualification a must.

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  1. Post
    #26
    CoRk wrote:
    Mainly I've been focusing on software development and test positions, but also some cyber security, dba, and data analyst roles. All entry level. I have an interview for a data analyst internship that is down in Wellington next week, though I'm not sure how much more employable such an internship would make me really. I do already have two internships on my CV, though the last was on 2012.
    Do you have any industry certs?

  2. Post
    #27
    Nope! Its just academic qualifications (bsc, pgdipsci, msc, phd), two summer internships, and a bunch of teaching. Which is why I've been targetting entry level graduate positions. I'm not sure whether my lack of success is more due to a mismatch of skills, my CV / cover letters not being up to snuff, or just luck really.

  3. Post
    #28
    I dunno if you've noticed or not, but a bunch of orgs have dropped a degree as a requirement for recruitment. They are now looking for demonstrated high level of practical skills. There are still grads cherry picked right out of uni but they have to show top grades and practical skills (e.g. pen testers). In roles like security you really need to have some certs under your belt or demonstrated some damn l33t h4xx0r skillz.

    Are the internships just a bulletpoint on your CV or do they tell a story of achievements?

    and passion, recruiters look for passion. A passing interest in a field isn't enough.

  4. Post
    #29
    Have you checked out the Summer of Tech program? They do CV review sessions with industry professionals. And mock interview processes to help grads out. I did a bunch of these and the students came out feeling a lot more positive.

    Showing practical outcomes of things you've done can help in a big way. It's also alot about showing initiative and curiosity.

    There are a lot of firms struggling to find candidates in various areas of the tech industry.

  5. Post
    #30
    what's the archi firm OP?

  6. Post
    #31
    Lots of my friends who work at Google were recruited from stackoverflow or github, with no formal qualifications - practical experience is definitely a bonus

  7. Post
    #32
    Cork — apply for Junior or Intermediate positions. You are massively overqualified for graduate positions. If I saw your CV in a grad position pile I’d bin it. You would command a salary that’s too high for that position and therefore wouldn’t be affordable and therefore it’s in the bin.

  8. Post
    #33
    No IT qualification IT master race reporting in.

  9. Post
    #34
    OK folks thanks for chiming in - we have enough local candidates.

    Cork - good luck and aim high!

  10. Post
    #35
    Yeah, I didn't bother with a degree, did Tafe/poly and it worked out pretty well for me.
    When I'm interviewing/hiring degrees generally don't mean shit in my field

  11. Post
    #36
    I'm looking to get my first IT job soon too and I'm pretty nooby about the whole workforce thing since I've always owned my own companies.. I've got a fresh BSc(CompSci) and a really old MCSE/MCDBA. Any tips?
    I figure I should code a few projects together as something to show off. I wanna do something a bit more free range than just 100% coding, but whatever as long as it's interesting. Lots of you guys know the industry much better than I do. I assume I'll have to work a nub job for a while wherever I start.

  12. Post
    #37
    With a BSc rather than an MSc/PhD, you're probably looking at more of a Grad position than Corky. Your first year or two will probably lean strongly towards coding, and will then let you move laterally to a field you enjoy more -- whether that's more BA work, or Team Leading, or getting a start in Architecture, Devops, Security, whatever. A BSc teaches you a vocabulary that provides the baseline for more learning, and the first two years will involve heaps more learning -- and no matter where you go, you'll always be able to leverage the skills you develop.

    It'll be a slightly wonky experience for you though. Grad programmes and Junior positions are still primarily setup around young people entering their first job (at least, in the straight Software industry, I can't speak to Syseng and whatever). Entering in that role as a mature person who's developed soft skills in other careers gives you a big advantage in some ways, and a disadvantage in others. Fair warning is all, you'll be fine.

  13. Post
    #38
    To start press any key

  14. Post
    #39
    I can't find the 'any' key?

  15. Post
    #40
    it's * dumbarse

  16. Post
    #41
    Privoxy wrote:
    I can't find the 'any' key?
    I cant find the NE key either

  17. Post
    #42
    Vulcan wrote:
    it's * dumbarse
    Privoxy doesn't have a numpad on his keyboard so he doesn't have the any key.

    And he calls himself a developer...

  18. Post
    #43
    why do you need a multiplication sign when you can just store two numbers in a register and multiply directly in assembly?

  19. Post
    #44
    frio wrote:
    With a BSc rather than an MSc/PhD, you're probably looking at more of a Grad position than Corky. Your first year or two will probably lean strongly towards HELPDESK
    fixed

  20. Post
    #45
    Quasi ELVIS wrote:
    I'm looking to get my first IT job soon too and I'm pretty nooby about the whole workforce thing since I've always owned my own companies.. I've got a fresh BSc(CompSci) and a really old MCSE/MCDBA. Any tips?
    I figure I should code a few projects together as something to show off. I wanna do something a bit more free range than just 100% coding, but whatever as long as it's interesting. Lots of you guys know the industry much better than I do. I assume I'll have to work a nub job for a while wherever I start.
    To reiterate what frio said, BSc is a junior level position, but that's just a foot in the door tbh. Given your transition to it later in your career (like me lol), and the fact that you bring real world experience, I'd suggest you aim for smaller employers running a meritocracy type arrangement, flat hierarchy, probably doing Scrum or Agile etc. etc. places like that have more potential for driven employees to branch out from straight coding.

    And yeah, a Github repo with your projects is never a bad idea, bonus points if I can clone them, build them and run the unit tests without any ****ery. I definitely check out any github url in a CV - I've met plenty of shit candidates with a bachelor's, so something like that gives me a better idea of their coding chops.

    And as for the old certifications - they're probably good for playing buzzword bingo with recruiters, but I'd have them on the CV as a foot-note.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Kog wrote:
    fixed
    Only if you work for Behemoth Corp, Incorporated.

  21. Post
    #46
    Edward Diego wrote:
    No IT qualification IT master race reporting in.
    You rang??? Do i still count if i'd prefer daily unanesthetised dental surgery, recreational waterboarding, and rats eating my scrotum to working in corporate nowadays?
    Last edited by Kid6o6; 8th September 2019 at 9:33 pm.

  22. Post
    #47
    LiQuid.Ace wrote:
    why do you need a multiplication sign when you can just store two numbers in a register and multiply directly in assembly?
    How do you propose to depress the any key then?

  23. Post
    #48
    hook getasynckeystate and return true regardless

  24. Post
    #49
    How do I get into I.T without a qual? Shit is tough these days!

    I know my computers thou, hook me up!

  25. Post
    #50
    For support/systems, do some certs. Or start on a help desk. Then so some certs. Then stab yourself in the face, it'll save you wanting to do it later.