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  1. Post
    #1

    Private Stormwater Connections in Auckland

    We bought a unit in Auckland about a year ago, and consistently in winter, the cesspit in our shared driveway is full of water, floods the driveway and is not draining. Auckland council have confirmed itís a privateís connection, and Iíve had a chat with the previous owner who said she had a vacuum truck attempt to empty it, and it would seem that itís not draining as pressure from the stormwater network is instead flooding through our cesspit.

    Iím at a loss of what to do, can we install a non return valve? A soak pit? Is it the councils responsibility to make sure the stormwater drains away?

  2. Post
    #2
    I'm guessing it's a soak pit? They can silt up over time especially if poorly designed. If so it'll need digging up and redoing. It'll be spendy.

  3. Post
    #3
    It’s a private stormwater cesspit that is connected into the council stormwater network.

    Issue is that the cesspit isn’t draining and when there’s rain it fills up with water from the stormwater network instead of draining away

  4. Post
    #4
    A cesspit is for sewerage/wastewater. A soak pit probably isn't all that necessary if you are connected to the storm water system.

    Perhaps it's just a sump you are looking at? How do you know that it's external stormwater entering your property and not just a blocked pipe preventing your own stormwater from draining, which in turn causes it to rise out of the sump?

    Might be best to get it inspected by camera.

  5. Post
    #5
    Council advised that it was a private cesspit, their words I guess, but it looks like one of the crates on the side of the road

    Previous owner paid for a vacuum truck to empty it and cctv, said there was no blockage but it’s always a possibility now

  6. Post
    #6
    Might be time for a stormwater pump then Send all that water out of someone else's sump.

    There should be some drain layers who are experts on storm water and surface flooding in Auckland. They would deal with this sort of thing all the time.

  7. Post
    #7
    Discovered that the outflow from the sump has been concreted in at the boundary, so isn't draining anywhere. Spoke with the neighbour involved who wouldnt admit anything but did say "you should know that illegal stormwater connections were common back in the day, and we didn't find any legal stormwater connections when we subdivided".

    Looking at the GIS I can tap into a public connection, but its approximately 5m through another neighbours garden, not sure we have the cash to do it.

  8. Post
    #8
    Esprit wrote:
    I'm guessing it's a soak pit? They can silt up over time especially if poorly designed. If so it'll need digging up and redoing. It'll be spendy.
    This could be the solution then. We have one for stormwater and they don't last forever before needing to be redone. I'm just hoping mine lasts years as the original one cost me like 5k. Hit up a drainlayer get their thoughts. One I spoke to said I might get 30 years if it doesn't get filled with leaves.

    Every situation will be different though. So may need site visit to determine your options.

  9. Post
    #9
    Subway wrote:
    Discovered that the outflow from the sump has been concreted in at the boundary, so isn't draining anywhere. Spoke with the neighbour involved who wouldnt admit anything but did say "you should know that illegal stormwater connections were common back in the day, and we didn't find any legal stormwater connections when we subdivided".

    Looking at the GIS I can tap into a public connection, but its approximately 5m through another neighbours garden, not sure we have the cash to do it.
    I would have thought that subdividing and building would require some sort of working stormwater drainage. I think you should go back to the council and see if something in the subdivision plans or building consents has been left incomplete.

  10. Post
    #10
    I probably didnt give enough detail, ours was developed in the 60s, the neighbour subdivided and built in 2006, he paid to have the stormwater main extended to his subdivided property, but it terminates about 5m away from where I need it

  11. Post
    #11
    Fragluton wrote:
    This could be the solution then. We have one for stormwater and they don't last forever before needing to be redone. I'm just hoping mine lasts years as the original one cost me like 5k. Hit up a drainlayer get their thoughts. One I spoke to said I might get 30 years if it doesn't get filled with leaves.

    Every situation will be different though. So may need site visit to determine your options.
    I just redid mine after 20 years and it still worked perfectly. Only had to shift mine as we extended the house out over where the old one was. No reason we won't get 30 years or more out of the new one, and it's not the end of the world to dig a new one, just a bit of expense and faffing around with an excavator.

  12. Post
    #12
    Map to hopefully show it better

    We are at 53 which was built/developed in the 1960s, the blue X is the drain in the middle of the driveway, the blue X on the boundary is where the current drain has been concreted off. 49A and 51A were subdivided and developed at the same time circa 2006, which is when the flooding problems started. In order for us to connect up to the public stormwater its approx 5 m.

    I've considered a soak pit, but we are quite low lying and im not sure there would be much soakage.


  13. Post
    #13
    You may found council also insist on a retention or detention tank as part of a new connection, so add a few thousand dollars.... Or, y'know , call em and ask, watercare have never been hard to deal with

  14. Post
    #14
    Are Watercare responsible for stormwater though? thought Auckland Council were.

    What i still can't understand is where the drain outflow previously hooked into the system, theres just nothing on the plans.

  15. Post
    #15
    What area are you in? Soak pits can work really well in some places due to volcanic (i.e. porous) rock.

  16. Post
    #16
    If a soak pit is viable you would probably already have one given thats how they disposed of stormwater back in the 60's.

    But yea, if you are near a volcano you might be able to lose the water in fractured basalt/scoria.