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  1. Post
    #1

    So I was told I needed an electrician...

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    Long story short, I'm not a pro at patching cables and couldn't find any diagrams with this Cat6 cable.

    Went in to PB to see if anyone could give me any advise and was told that an electrician would have to patch it back for me or just buy a new one...

    Anyway, anyone have any diagrams with these type of wiring?

  2. Post
    #2
    It isn't cat6. Looks like 8 core alarm cable or something. Where is it being used?

  3. Post
    #3
    Just using it like a LAN cable bro.

    This is where I got it from - https://www.emax.co.nz/index.php?mai...oducts_id=3685

    I felt weird as well when I first saw it but it works fine when I previously plugged it up.

  4. Post
    #4
    Oh right, didn't even click it was a patch cable. Maybe because you were talking about electricians. Guy is an idiot, but kinda right in that you're better off buying a new cable rather than a crimp tool and some ends. Consider the light colours to be the stripes, the white to be the white to be the striped orange, and confirm with the twisted pairs/looking at the other end if it's still on there? Definitely bargain basement "cat6" though.

  5. Post
    #5
    Not like any Cat6 I've ever seen. What are you trying to do with it?

  6. Post
    #6
    AgrAde wrote:
    Oh right, didn't even click it was a patch cable. Maybe because you were talking about electricians. Guy is an idiot, but kinda right in that you're better off buying a new cable rather than a crimp tool and some ends. Consider the light colours to be the stripes, the white to be the white to be the striped orange, and confirm with the twisted pairs/looking at the other end if it's still on there? Definitely bargain basement "cat6" though.
    Yeah that was what I was thinking but didn't feel right and needed confirmation. The other end is still there but I can't see through the connector lol.

    WeenieBeenie wrote:
    Not like any Cat6 I've ever seen. What are you trying to do with it?

    Yeah I was like where's the stripes?! Just using it for computer use.

  7. Post
    #7
    orange white, orange, green white, blue, blue white, green


    wait **** i think im missing two

  8. Post
    #8
    You don't need to strip them, snip them clean and straight. The RJ45 will break the insulator when you crimp it.

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    A regular cable is A to A (side 1 to side 1), or B to B (side 2 to side 2), this is a crossover example but I chose it because it clearly shows what you should be looking at when wiring it (the bottom), and shows both A and B. Look through the connector on the other side and match it up to see whether it's A or B, and make it look the same on the other side if you hold the two connects side by side.

    If you can't see through the connector on the other side, snip it too and do both.

    Depending on your RJ45s, either push the cables all the way through like this:
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    Crimp, then snip.

    Or if you can't push them through, flatten them out side by side. Cut them using your crimping tool so that they're flat. Then shove them into the RJ45 and crimp.

    Unless you're running POE, you won't break anything by doing it wrong (and most modern routers and switches are actually pretty forgiving if you accidentally do them as crossover, they'll usually detect and just deal with it). Worst case scenario is it won't work, then just snip it and do it again.

    They're all data inputs/outputs, so they're made to handle the voltage that each channel can carry. It's not like running a power line at 48V through a data line expecting 5 or 12.

  9. Post
    #9
    Are the wires twisted together in pairs inside the sleeve? Just out of interest.

    For short runs I tend to just buy complete cables from Tastech, saves farting around for a few bucks.

  10. Post
    #10
    Whatever that cable is, it's not cat 6. Amongst many other things the colour coding of the pairs is part of the spec.

  11. Post
    #11
    Just buy a new patch lead, they are around $5 for a 5m one, not worth repairing unless you already have the tools.

  12. Post
    #12
    Thanks suntoucher, much appreciated with the diagram.

    Yeah I bought the tools to do it previously and thought I'd give it a go.

    It was not twisted at all when I cut it.

    And yes, much cheaper to just buy lol. But I guess its more of those "the more you know" kinda thing, just in case in the future I wanted to cut and wire shorter ones.

  13. Post
    #13
    yuRiko wrote:
    It was not twisted at all when I cut it.
    Ouch. What sort of throughput do you get with that cable?

  14. Post
    #14
    What. wrote:
    orange white, orange, green white, blue, blue white, green


    wait **** i think im missing two
    Green/White - Green - Orange/White - Blue - Blue/White - Orange - Brown/White - Brown

    I remember the first time someone told me that pattern and I never forgot it for some reason. Just one of those random things you can always remember.

  15. Post
    #15
    WeenieBeenie wrote:
    Green/White - Green - Orange/White - Blue - Blue/White - Orange - Brown/White - Brown

    I remember the first time someone told me that pattern and I never forgot it for some reason. Just one of those random things you can always remember.
    I have it committed to memory too, but i do crimp those on fairly often.

  16. Post
    #16
    AgrAde wrote:
    Ouch. What sort of throughput do you get with that cable?
    Surprisingly good. I'm on Gigabit and get 850 down and around 350-400 up.

    Not sure if this matters but I'm currently using the Tp-Link AX11000 router

  17. Post
    #17
    yuRiko wrote:
    Surprisingly good. I'm on Gigabit and get 850 down and around 350-400 up.

    Not sure if this matters but I'm currently using the Tp-Link AX11000 router
    Was there a plastic cross section inside the cable that separated all the pairs? You would have had to cut it back to take the original photo. If not, you got trolled, it's CAT5E

  18. Post
    #18
    It's not even cat5e. The colours are wrong and he already said none of the cores were twisted into pairs.

  19. Post
    #19
    Yep so there wasn't a plastic cross section and there were no twisted pairs. Lol.

    I took my Cat6 to have a look and it had everything mentioned above, plastic cross section and twisted pairs.

    Its crazy how this cable is performing like a Cat6.

  20. Post
    #20
    yuRiko wrote:
    Yep so there wasn't a plastic cross section and there were no twisted pairs. Lol.

    I took my Cat6 to have a look and it had everything mentioned above, plastic cross section and twisted pairs.

    Its crazy how this cable is performing like a Cat6.
    Nah, CAT6 can do 10Gb. CAT5 can do 1Gb which is what you're getting. But really the specifications are interference minimisation to guarantee the data at a maximum throughput at a minimum length, as opposed to different cabling.

    EG, if I run at a frequency that could achieve Gb I drop 20% of packets, so I'll run at 100Mb max where 100% of packets succeed. So the lower specs, in the right environment, could potentially run above their rating, but the rating is a guarantee at what they'll run at at the maximum length, there's less interference at shorter lengths.

    There's a good chance that your guarantee is an outright lie, but at, say 30cm, then a CAT5 could probably achieve 10Gb.

  21. Post
    #21
    suntoucher wrote:
    Nah, CAT6 can do 10Gb. CAT5 can do 1Gb which is what you're getting. But really the specifications are interference minimisation to guarantee the data at a maximum throughput at a minimum length, as opposed to different cabling.

    EG, if I run at a frequency that could achieve Gb I drop 20% of packets, so I'll run at 100Mb max where 100% of packets succeed. So the lower specs, in the right environment, could potentially run above their rating, but the rating is a guarantee at what they'll run at at the maximum length, there's less interference at shorter lengths.

    There's a good chance that your guarantee is an outright lie, but at, say 30cm, then a CAT5 could probably achieve 10Gb.
    Don't think I have the resources to test it nor will my household internet ever go above 1Gbps lol.